People For the American Way Foundation

Richard Serra Donates Series “Fake President” to PFAW Foundation

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Richard Serra, legendary American artist renowned for his large metal sculptures and black and white works, has created an iconic series titled Fake President in honor of Norman Lear’s 95th birthday and to help PFAW Foundation. The donation reflects the longstanding relationship of art and advocacy in pushing boundaries and changing minds just as Lear’s shows, like All in the Family and The Jeffersons, have for decades. This isn’t Serra’s first experience with activism: he created a piece about torture at Abu Ghraib in 2004 and closing his gallery’s doors for the J20 Art Strike on Inauguration Day 2017. Right now, fighting for free expression, religious liberty, equal justice under the law, and the right to vote has become even more urgent and important. We are thankful for Serra’s support. Learn more about the artists celebrating Lear’s birthday in The Hollywood Reporter.

Fake President, 2017: Screenprint with red hand-stamping, signed & numbered, 24″ x 18″
Limited Edition of 250, $2,000 plus shipping

In addition, a variety of other artwork has been donated to an ongoing sale, which includes artists such as Ed Ruscha, Jasper Johns, Dustin Yellin, Robert Rauschenberg, Nancy Chunn, William Wegman, Cindy Sherman, Carrie Mae Weems, Nancy Spero, and Chuck Close. You may browse the artwork for sale here: www.pfaw.org/nl95artsale. To purchase one of the prints, click here.

100% of the proceeds will go to fund PFAW Foundation’s efforts to monitor and counter the Right Wing, fight money in politics, advocate for fair and just courts, and support our successful leadership networks as they mobilize young people, African American clergy, and progressive elected officials in their communities across the country to build a bench.

The artwork will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, please contact Louise Balsmeyer at (202) 467-2328 or lbalsmeyer@pfaw.org.

A purchase of artwork at retail value is not considered a charitable contribution and therefore is not tax deductible.

This post was written by Louise Balsmeyer.