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Phil Robertson On Abortion, ISIS And His Dream Of Being Donald Trump's Spiritual Advisor

Religious Right activist and Colorado state lawmaker Gordon Klingenschmitt had a chance to interview Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson at the Western Conservative Summit held in Denver earlier this month. On a recent episode of his "Pray In Jesus Name" program, Klingenschmitt sat down with Robertson, who shared his wisdom on the tie between legal abortion and ISIS and revealed his fantasy that Donald Trump will turn to Christ with the help of his spiritual advisor, Phil Robertson.

Robertson kicked things off by warning that the world is descending into lawlessness, which can all be linked back to the legalization of abortion.

"We've killed 60 million of our own children," he said. "ISIS is saying to us, 'Well, if you didn't think your own children were worth anything, why do you think we're worried about what your life is worth? We don't think you're worth anything, that's why we're killing you. Just like you kill your children, that's why we kill you. We don't think you're worth anything.'"

"If we could have stood there and told them, 'No, to us life is precious,'" Robertson said, then things would be different, but sadly "we lost the moral high ground."

Later, Robertson said that he would be voting for Donald Trump in November only because he doesn't like Hillary Clinton and hopes that Trump will be better. 

Ideally, Robertson said, "we convert Mr. Trump" to Christianity so that all of his past scandals and indiscretions that will be brought up during the campaign will be rendered moot because he has been born again.

"If he but be born again, he could then tell them, 'That's the old me, I've been born again, this is the new Donald Trump,'" Robertson said, envisioning a cabinet meeting where he would be introduced to the world as President Trump's spiritual advisor.

"Now, that would send a shock wave through America," he said. "The left-wingers would be jumping out of buildings."

Right Wing Round-Up - 7/13/16

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/13/16

  • Do you want to "reap the eternal rewards of making a difference for God's kingdom"? Well, Liberty Counsel is hiring.
  • Pamela Geller is suing Facebook.
  • David and Jason Benham know the cause of last week's violence in Dallas: "You look in the 1960s, we removed prayer from school, Bible readings from school, the Ten Commandments were taken off of the wall. And then in response to that, 1973, abortion ... Because of the bloodshed in the womb, now we are starting to see it in the streets. I'm telling you, it is because we as a nation have left God."
  • Richard Land says that "it is well past time for some national political figure, preferably President Obama, if he has it in him, to seize a 'Sister Souljah' moment and denounce the anti-police, inflammatory, violence-inducing rhetoric of the Black Lives Matter movement."
  • Finally, the Eagle Forum is outraged by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's opposition to Donald Trump: "She fears him because he is the most formidable foe the Left has seen since Ronald Reagan."

GOP Platform Committee Member David Barton Falsely Claims His Anti-Gay Comments Were Taken Out Of Context

It seems that just about every time a Religious Right activist is asked by the press to comment on some outrageous thing that Right Wing Watch has caught them saying, they respond by simply asserting that those comments were "taken out of context" without ever explaining how our reporting supposedly misrepresented their statements or bothering to explain how understanding the real context would have in any way changed the meaning of what they said.

And this is exactly what David Barton, a member of the Republican National Convention's platform committee and a longtime Religious Right activist, did when the the Daily Beast asked him to comment on two of the many offensive statements he has made about LGBT people, both of which were first reported by Right Wing Watch:

And David Barton, a committee member from Texas, believes that God is preventing the medical profession from finding a cure for HIV/AIDS, and claimed that gay people die “decades earlier” than others and have more than 500 partners apiece in their lifetimes.

Barton told The Daily Beast that these statements did not represent his views, and this was “an example of something taken out of context and mischaracterized. I’m an advocate for faith-based conservative values, which include love, grace, and truth, focusing on traditional family values.”

Since Barton doesn't bother to clarify the "context" in which these comments were made, allow us to do so.

In the case of his claim that gay people die "decades earlier" and have hundreds of sexual partners, Barton said that on his radio program back in 2010, when he was somewhat facetiously making the case that the government should regulate gay people's sex lives.

Barton argued that since the government seeks to regulate all sorts of things that are unhealthy, it should also regulate consensual sex between members of the same gender because it is not only dangerous for those who practice it but bad for society as well:

Homosexual/bi-sexual individuals are seven times more likely to contemplate or commit suicide. Oooh, that doesn’t sound very healthy.

Homosexuals die decades earlier than heterosexuals. That doesn’t sound healthy.

Nearly one-half of practicing homosexuals admit to five hundred or more sex partners and nearly one-third admit to a thousand or more sex partners in a lifetime.

There is no mischaracterization involved in quoting his statement that "homosexuals die decades earlier" and that some gay people "admit to five hundred of more sexual partners," as that is exactly what he said.

The same goes for his comments about God preventing us from ever finding a cure for AIDS because doing so would eliminate the penalty for sin.

Barton has been saying this since 2012 and we have heard him make this claim on several occasions, asserting just last year:

I don't think they will ever find a vaccine for HIV/AIDS. And I say that based on a particular Bible verse ... Notice this, homosexuals receive in their bodies the penalty due them. The Bible says if you engage in homosexuality, your body will do things that will penalize you. So if you can have a vaccine for AIDS, then you're keeping your body from penalizing you. I don't think they'll ever find a vaccine for AIDS.

Again, there is nothing "out of context" about this remark, which he has made multiple times. 

Barton continuously makes unfounded and offensive remarks about LGBT people and has repeatedly suggested that God is punishing gay people with a deadly disease, yet the Republican Party continues to invite him to help shape their national platform — which just so happens to be extraordinarily hostile to LGBT people. Barton’s unconvincing attempts at denying his past comments shouldn't let them get away with it.

Right Wing Round-Up - 7/12/16

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/12/16

  • Chris Simcox, co-founder of the Minuteman border patrol vigilante group, has been sentenced to 19.5 years in prison after being convicted of sexually abusing young girls. 
  • Phyllis Schlafly is angry that the "disloyal" Ted Cruz has not yet endorsed Donald Trump.
  • Ohio-based Religious Right activist Phil Burress has announced that he is retiring.
  • David Barton says that if conservative Christians would just vote, they could take control of government: "With an additional five million voters, we would have all of the House all of the Senate and the presidency in conservative hands."
  • Finally, Richard Land is not comfortable with the prospect of Donald Trump selecting Newt Gingrich as his running mate: "I think a total of six wives for the president and vice president together is probably a few too many to make most evangelicals comfortable."

Glenn Beck: 'Pack Your Crap And Move To Texas ... Before We Close The Northern Border'

On his radio program today, Glenn Beck declared that America is now out of options and speeding toward inevitable destruction and advised his audience to "pack your crap and move to Texas ... before we close the northern border."

Beck raised alarms about the fact that retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has been mentioned as possible vice presidential running mate for Donald Trump, saying that it's a sign that Trump thinks that "real civil unrest is coming and he needs to have somebody who has the experience of law and order" advising him.

"I told you these things were coming," Beck said, adding that turning to God is the nation's only option at this point but that nobody wants to hear that. 

Citing an incident in which Black Lives Matters protesters and counter-protesters in Dallas embraced one another over the weekend, Beck said it was proof that "there's still a God culture here" and so people should hurry up and move to Texas.

"I told you to move to Texas for a reason," he said, "you're seeing that. I told you when things go to hell in a hand basket, you want to be around like-minded people. You're seeing that. Look at the difference between the shooting of six cops in Dallas and what happened in Dallas and what's happening today in Dallas compared to what happened in Ferguson and Baltimore. You're losing time. Pack your crap and move to Texas ... before we close the northern border."

The Absurd Hypocrisy At The Heart Of David Barton's 'School Of Practical Government'

Right-wing pseudo-historian and GOP platform committee member David Barton closed out a presentation last week at Charis Bible College in Colorado, where he is in the process of launching a "School of Practical Government," by sharing a couple of historical quotes that perfectly expose the utterly absurd hypocrisy that lies at the heart of his latest endeavor.

After spending nearly an hour explaining how his "School of Practical Government" will prepare students to seek public office for the purpose of implementing public policy based explicitly on the Bible, Barton read quotes from the likes of Samuel Adams and Benjamin Rush, who have said that those who seek office are not to be trusted and that those who refuse to serve in office when asked are selfish.

First he cited this quote from Adams:

It bodes very ill to Government when Men are exalted to places of high trust through their own Sollicitations.  He only fills a place with Dignity, who is invited to it by his Fellow Citizens, from the Experience they have had of his adequate Abilities, & who does the Duties of it with Zeal & Fidelity ... Whoever interposes in their Elections, with his own Sollicitations for himself, it is to be feard, if he is of any Consequence, will in time become a dangerous Party Man.  He ought therefore to be despised as an obtruder.

Barton then cited a similar quote from Noah Webster:

As a general rule, it may be affirmed that the man who never intrigues for office may be most safely entrusted with office...Such a man cannot desire promotion unless he received it from the respectable part of the community, for he considers no other promotion to be honorable.

It seems rather odd that Barton would cite quotes warning voters not to trust people who seek public office while promoting a school that is designed to teach people how to run for office and even includes a class entitled "How to Run For Office."

To make matters worse, Barton then cited a quote from Rush to argue that if people approach you to ask you to run for office, "you are not allowed to say 'no' because that was being selfish ... Didn't God put you here to serve others? "

Back in 2013, Barton himself was asked by his friends like Glenn Beck to run for the U.S. Senate and refused to do so, though that has somehow not stopped him from regularly lecturing other people that they have no right to be selfish by doing exactly what he did.

Bryan Fischer: 'It's Not Okay For Christians To Have Diverse Opinions'

On his radio program yesterday, Bryan Fischer recounted a debate he had last week on Twitter with Christian Today writer Andrew Walton over Walton's piece criticizing the newly opened Ark Encounter theme park in Kentucky, which was built by the Creationist group Answers in Genesis for the purpose of promoting the organization's fundamentalist view of the Bible.

During his discussion, Fischer took exception to Walton's assertion in his article that Christians "may have diverse opinions on sexual ethics, on life issues, on evolution, on hell, on what role government should play in society, on healthcare, and indeed on science," insisting that, in fact, Christians cannot have opinions on those issues if they differ from Fischer's interpretation of the Bible.

"No, it is not okay for Christians to be all over the map, to have diverse opinions," Fischer insisted. "No, it's not okay. The Bible is abundantly clear about sexual ethics, sex is reserved for marriage, marriage is a union of one man and one woman, homosexuality is a sin, sexual immorality is a sin, et cetera. These things are not ambiguous in the scripture so, no, it's not okay to have diverse opinions on those issues."

"It's not okay to have diverse opinions on life issues," Fischer continued. "It's not okay for Christians to have diverse opinions about evolution."

Right Wing Round-Up - 7/11/16

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