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Right Wing Leftovers - 2/3/14

  • Nothing make the Right rally around someone they hate faster than seeing that person "attacked" by the media, which explains why Chris Christie has suddenly been invited to speak at CPAC after being snubbed in previous years.
  • Glenn Beck seems to think that the late Ken Hutcherson was somehow responsible for the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl victory.
  • Rick Green is not happy about a lesbian couple appearing on the show "Good Luck Charlie": "We should be loving people by telling them the truth and helping them find healthy relationships and lifestyles, not deceiving another generation with images that misrepresent a lifestyle. Disney now joins the political agenda that puts a pretty face on the sexual deviancy of our culture."
  • Peter LaBarbera says gay activists are trying to "co-opt Christianity" by "fooling Christians into believing that gay rights is consistent with biblical Christianity."
  • It is nice to see Pamela Geller branch out from her Muslim-bashing into transgender-bashing.
  • Finally, Larry Klayman did not like the recent State of the Union Address: "Last Tuesday, fraudulently elected President Barack Hussein Obama treated the American people to yet another empty and frightening speech. Not even eligible to be standing on the podium addressing a joint session of Congress for the State of the Union Address – as Obama is not a natural born citizen, as required by the Constitution, sired in the United States by two citizen parents – the socialist, anti-Semitic, anti-Christian and anti-white, anti-Israeli, Muslim-sympathizer-in-chief spewed forth a masterful performance, all the while ignoring the cancer that has metastasized in his administration – a cancer that threatens the continued existence of our severely wounded nation."

Hypocrisy, Thy Name Is Bryan Fischer

One of the amazing things about monitoring the Religious Right on a daily basis is realizing the frequency with which right-wing figures engage in abject hypocrisy, seemingly unaware of their own past behavior or public statements.

Take Bryan Fischer's radio program today, for instance, when he and a caller named Bobby had a somewhat contentious exchange stemming from a recent comment made by Paul Reville, the former secretary of education for Massachusetts, was said that "the children belong to all of us."

The debate between Fischer and Bobby was not particularly interesting, but what was interesting is that when Fischer returned from the break, he admitted that he might have been a little too hard on Bobby. Fischer didn't necessarily think he had been unfair and defending his behavior during the previous segment by insisting that the caller had needed some "tough love" because he was refusing to answer Fischer's simple questions.

"He was trying to avoid answer the question," Fischer said, in his own defense. "And that's why I wasn't going to let him skate on the question ... You needed a little tough love there buddy, because you were trying to skate on what was a simple and straightforward and honest question and it was my responsibility to kind of hold you to account for facing the truth":

Now let us contrast Fischer's "tough love" approach to callers on his own show to his behavior when he appeared on Alan Colmes' radio program a few years ago where he literally refused to answer any of Colmes' question, simply repeating the same talking point over and over and over again because he did not like the line of questioning. 

To top it off, Fischer then complained that Colmes' interview was nothing but "gotcha journalism," complaining that "there was an answer that he was going to pester me until I gave it and then he could grab it and say 'gotcha,'" which is why Fischer insisted on simply parroting his talking points over and over again:

Today, Fischer literally did this very thing to a caller on his show and defended his actions on the grounds that the caller needed some tough love because he was refusing to answer the questions. But when the roles were reversed, Fischer was outraged because it was nothing more than "gotcha journalism" when it happened to him.

Beck: Coke's Super Bowl Ad Was An 'In Your Face' Effort To 'Divide People'

Glenn Beck was pleasantly surprised by last night's Super Bowl because he didn't witness anything that upset or offended him except, of course, for the Coca-Cola commercial featuring a rendition of "America The Beautiful" sung in various languages.

That ad, Beck declared on his radio program today, was "an in your face" effort "to divide people."

The entire point of the ad was, according to Beck, to send the message that "if you don't like it, if you're offended by it, then you're a racist ... That's all this is, is to divide people":

Daubenmire: 'I Believe It's Time For Us To, Once Again, Ban Pornography'

"Coach" Dave Daubenmire was on his computer recently when he received an offer to view pornography on the internet and, while it was unwanted, it was also was very, very tempting to him ... so obviously, the only solution to this sort of temptation is to completely ban and criminalize pornography.

"This may seem really radical to you, but we seem to be rational people here in America," Daubenmire declared. "I believe it's time for us to, once again, ban pornography."

Comparing it to smoking, drug use, and drunk driving, Daubenmire proclaimed that pornography is "the greatest scourge in America" and called for those who produce it and view it to be arrested:

Pat Robertson Insists That He's Not 'Some Sort Of Right-Wing Extremist'

Last week, Pat Robertson spoke with Glenn Beck's "The Blaze" to address the statement he made last year that there was nothing sinful about people who are transgender. In the interview, Robertson stood by his previous assertion, which was mildly surprising ... but what was more surprising is Robertson's belief that he is in no way an "extremist" but is, in fact, quite "balanced" and "mainstream":

Evangelist and businessman Pat Robertson is no stranger to controversy, but he recently told TheBlaze that he believes some of his critics have spread a major fallacy about his political standing.

“Well, I think the misconception is that I’m some sort of right-wing extremist,” Robertson said. That, he said, just isn’t the case. “I’m a graduate of Yale Law School and I’m a businessman.”

Running down his credentials and accomplishments (he founded Regent University, the American Center for Law and Justice and the Christian Broadcasting Network, among other organizations) Robertson said it’s easy to make a caricature of someone to score political points and to dub him or her “extreme” as his critics have done.

In contrast to his media portrait, Robertson believes that he’s actually “extremely balanced.”

“I’m what you’d call a Jeffersonian Democrat [who believes in] fundamental … biblical values,” Robertson said. “That isn’t extreme, that’s mainstream.”

We'd just like to say that if Pat Robertson does not qualify as "some sort of right-wing extremist," then that phrase has no meaning.

Right Wing Round-Up - 1/31/14

Right Wing Leftovers - 1/31/14

  • When he spoke at a March for Life rally in South Carolina recently, David Barton was apparently honored by the state Senate.
  • Speaking of South Carolina, we are not at all surprised to learn that Lee Bright has picked up an endorsement from Rep. Steve Stockman.
  • Gordon Klingenschmitt says that "conservative chaplains are going underground" because they are worried about being persecuted by the military.
  • Apparently the Bible is predicting that both the Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks are going to win the Super Bowl.
  • Speaking of football, "Coach" Dave Daubenmire is not happy with all the people who are sissifying his beloved sport.
  • Finally, Bryan Fischer says that Dinesh D'Souza is being persecuted because he is a Christian, just like Jesus, Peter, and Paul.

Another Math And Reading Comprehension Lesson For David Barton

One of the most annoying things about David Barton, aside from his incessant tendency to blindside his co-host Rick Green by asking him questions to which he could not possibly be expected to know the answer, is the fact that Barton rarely bothers to cite any source for the answers that he provides (nor for the "facts" that make up his historical presentations, for that matter).

We have become convinced that one of the reasons Barton generally does not provide the source of his "facts" is because, if he did, people might actually go and look them up on their own and realize that Barton cannot be trusted to accurately relay information because of his tendency to utterly misrepresent even the simplest of facts.

On today's "Wallbuilders Live," Barton once again provided a perfect example of this when he claimed that three-quarters of all abortions performed in America are done on young women ages sixteen and under:

Barton: What demographic group accounts for the largest percentage of abortions? Let me give you [a hint]: this demographic group accounts for seventy-five percent of all abortions ...

Green: I'm going to guess over [the age of] thirty?

Barton: Nope. Gotta go the other way. Seventy-five percent of all abortions are performed on teenagers below the age of sixteen ... Remember, one of the problems we have with abortion clinics is they do not report statutory rape, they do abortions instead. So a young girl comes in pregnant at eleven or twelve or thirteen, that's supposed to be reported as statutory rape because it's well below the age of consent but rather than reporting it, they simply do an abortion ... You have seventy-five percent of all abortions being performed on teens who are sixteen and under.

The figure that Barton cites (or rather, misrepresents) comes from a recent report and presentation from the Family Research Council's Marriage and Religion Research Institute which found that "almost 3/4 of abortions are to women who initiated sex at age 16 or younger - 40% of women who begin sexual intercourse very early (12-13-14) will have abortions."

The report did not find, as Barton asserted, that three-quarters of all abortions are done on women under the age of sixteen, but rather that almost three-quarters of women who have had abortions became sexually active at the age of sixteen or before.

That is obviously a pretty significant difference and one that "a former math teacher" like Barton ought to understand ... provided, of course, that Barton actually cares about providing accurate information, which certainly does not seem to be a priority for him.

When In Public, Tim Wildmon Can Tell Who Is Gay Because 'They Walk Like A Girl'

One thing we constantly hear from anti-gay activists is that they do not hate gay people and, in fact, personally have a lot of gay people either as friends or family whom they know and love. But that must not be the case with Tim Wildmon and Linda Harvey because, after listening to them talk about gay people for a few minutes, one has to wonder if they've ever actually even met a gay person. 

Harvey was a guest on "AFA Today" recently to discuss her new book "Maybe He's Not Gay: Another View on Homosexuality" and during the interview, Wildmon began to wonder just why gay men are so effeminate, declaring that when he is out in public, "I can tell you who's gay" just by looking at them.

"They have these effeminate, a lot of them, actions," Wildmon declared. "They walk like a girl, a lot of them. I mean, I'm just being honest. This is what everybody says but maybe nobody talks about publicly, and it just makes you wonder, how did that develop, where does that come from?"

An ignorant question like that deserves an equally ignorant answer, which is just want Harvey provided, blaming it on Hollywood's effort to "feminize" men by providing male role models that "just aren't masculine."

"It's very wrong," she said. "It is definitely pulling people away from a biblical model of manhood and womanhood":

Wildmon: Republicans Would Have Impeached A Republican President Obama

On yesterday's broadcast of "Today's Issues," the AFA's Tim Wildmon interviewed Robert Knight about President Obama's recent State of the Union Address and various other issues. During the conversation, Wildmon shared his truly amazing belief that if a Republican president had done the things Obama has done, Republicans would have impeached him and removed him from office.

Wildmon declared that there is no Christian influence within the Democratic Party "so they don't have any moral standards to abide by," which is why Obama can get away with his "lawlessness and lying." Republicans, on the other hand, have a pretty strong "Christian element" within the party that does not tolerate such things, and that is why "if a [Republican] president had done what Obama has done, they would be told 'you gotta go,' by your own party; 'you can 't do this.'"

"I really believe that," Wildmon said ... apparently having forgotten the entire eight years "lawlessness and lying" of the George W. Bush administration:

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