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Right Wing Round-Up - 3/25/13

Right Wing Leftovers - 3/25/13

  • Things continue not going well for Michele Bachmann.
  • Matt Barber says that if the Supreme Court doesn't make the correct rulings on DOMA and Prop 8, it "will literally shake Western civilization to the core." Literally?

  • Richard Land likewise weighs in, saying "we should not think that our nation will escape God's judgment if we redefine what God has already defined. We are certain that the omniscient and omnipotent God is aware of our nation's debate about marriage and that He is watching what we do."
  • Jeb Bush praises his brother, the former president, "not having an opinion on anything over the last four years." That is supposed to be compliment?
  • Finally, apparently Tea Partiers are now boycotting Fox News for being too liberal.

Cindy Jacobs' Prayers Can Cure Insanity

On the most recent episode of "God Knows," Cindy Jacobs recounted a time when a young woman came to her to ask her to pray for her aunt, who had been committed to a mental hospital.  Knowing that neither the young women nor her aunt had the faith necessary to stand in the gap against the demonic spirit afflicting her, Cindy took it upon herself to pray and "bind the spirit of insanity" and so she "bound the spirit of darkness off that women and, you know, she was totally set free in her mind [and] released from the institution":

Barber: Roe v Wade and Dred Scott Are 'Twin Bookends of Evil'

Last week, Mat Staver and Matt Barber hailed legislation passed in North Dakota and elsewhere aimed at dramatically curtailing the availability and legality of abortion, with Barber proclaiming that Roe v Wade was no different than the infamous Dred Scott decision, calling them "twin bookends of evil" and "shameful decisions that are a blight on America's history":

Fischer: If People Made the Connection Between Gay Rights and Sex, It Would 'Gross Them Right Out'

On Friday's radio broadcast, Bryan Fischer asserted that the success of gay rights movement is dependent upon a deliberate effort to "keep the eyes of Americans off what it is that homosexuals do when they come together" because if people actually think about it, "it's going to gross them right out" since people have a "visceral moral reaction" to that kind of "deviant behavior":

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/22/13

Right Wing Leftovers - 3/22/13

  • Glenn Beck calls Rabbi Daniel Lapin "David Barton on steroids," so that pretty much tells you all you need to know about Lapin.
  • Ohio's Republican Gov. John Kasich announced his support for civil unions ... and then immediately backtracked.
  • I cannot believe that we were denied the joys of a Gingrich-Santorum unity ticket!
  • "Family Research Council has taken a bold new action," by which it means launching a daily radio program hosted by Tony Perkins, for which it needs money, of course.
  • Finally, James Dobson says that "at times it seems as though our elected and appointed leaders are trying to destabilize the country."

Memo to Reince Priebus: Mike Huckabee's Anti-Gay Views Are Not 'Reasonable'

Via Think Progress, we see that Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus thinks that a good way for the GOP to win support from voters who have turned away from the party is to start sounding "reasonable" ... like Mike Huckabee:

Priebus cited former governor Mike Huckabee of Arkansas as an example of someone who could be “a model for a lot of people in our party” in terms of discussing issues like marriage and abortion. “I always tell people: Listen to Governor Mike Huckabee,” he said. “I don’t know anyone that talks about them any better.”

Ummm ... does Prebius really think that Huckabee has a good record of sounding "reasonable" on these issues? Does he actually even know anything about Huckabee's anti-gay views?

Huckabee was, after all, the candidate of choice for a cavalcade of rabidly anti-gay Religious Right activists for a reason and with whom he continues to associate. Heck, he even received an award from Vision America in 2010 which is run by a man who still declares that AIDS is God's punishment for immoral behavior. And just last year, he campaigned for a congressional candidate who openly supports the criminalization of homosexuality.

Huckabee has declared that, if he became president, he would reinstate Don't Ask, Don't Tell and proclaimed that he is looking for "spiritual warriors" who will not allow the nation to fall "to the hands of those who would enslave us" but will instead stand and fight against marriage equality. In fact, his opposition to gay marriage is well-known, as he has compared it to bestiality and alcholism:

"The problem with changing the definition of marriage is that once you cross that line, then there's no stopping," he explains. He tells me that when he spoke recently in Japan, there was an American student there who objected to his views on gay marriage. "This was right in the middle of what was going on in west Texas, and I thought, Okay, how can we say that what those polygamists in west Texas are doing is wrong if we allow same-sex marriage? Who are you to tell them that that man can't have fifteen wives? [The student said] 'Well, it's not the same!' And I said, 'Okay, well, here's another one: bestiality. Now I know you're going to have a problem,' and he just went berserk on that. But there was recently an actual news story where a man wanted to marry his animal. . . . I think it was a sheep."

Huckabee says he doesn't know if homosexuality is inborn, but he believes you can control the behavior. He compares homosexuality to obesity or alcoholism: "Some people have a predisposition to alcoholism. Does that mean they're not responsible for getting drunk? No."

And finally, who could ever forget his statement from 1992 calling for those infected with HIV to be quarantined, a position he refused to retract even when he ran for president:

"It is the first time in the history of civilization in which the carriers of a genuine plague have not been isolated from the general population," he said. "This deadly disease, for which there is no cure, is being treated as a civil rights issue instead of the true health crisis it represents.

"If the federal government is truly serious about doing something with the AIDS virus, we need to take steps that would isolate the carriers of this plague."

If this is the sort of stuff that Priebus thinks will make the GOP seem "reasonable," then the party is in even deeper trouble than we imagined.

Barton: 'Conspiracy Mentalities Are a Bad Deal'

On the weekly "Good News Friday" episode of "WallBuilders Live" today, David Barton cited a poll supposedly showing that a majority of Americans believe that the government poses a threat to their rights and freedoms, which he suggested is a good thing because it meant that there was also a majority of citizens who would be willing to stand up and push back.

But there was also a danger, Barton warned, in that it could lead people to fear the government which, in turn, leads to conspiracy theories:

I think fear causes you to do a lot of things.  Conspiracy mentalities are a bad deal. We're told in Isaiah 8:11 not to call conspiracy everything that everybody else calls conspiracy ... The problem with conspiracy is that faith is actually fear and if you have a lot of faith, that is having fear.  Job said "that which I feared has come upon me;"  it's like having faith for bad stuff to happen.

...

A lot of times when you get a conspiratorial mentality, it causes you to act in ways that the conspiracy actually becomes self-fulfilling prophecy. So I think on the one hand, as long as we have a health skepticism of government and Washington and their ability and, actually, their efforts right now to take power, I think that that's healthy so long as it doesn't turn into fear that becomes conspiratorial and phobic which then drives us to do things that causes Washington to really come after us.

Hmmm ... maybe Barton ought to share this view with his BFF Glenn Beck the next time he appears on his program.

Barber & Crampton: Christians Must 'Rise Up' and 'Resist' if SCOTUS Strikes Down DOMA

On a recent "Faith and Freedom" radio program, Matt Barber and Steve Crampton discussed the looming Supreme Court hearing over the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act during which they declared that if the Court strikes it down, "it is high time the people rise up against the tyranny of the judiciary."

"If the judges foist this upon us, we need to resist," proclaimed Crampton, which prompted Barber to respond that Christians will have seriously consider civil disobedience, saying "in the spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr, it may be the time for peaceful civil disobedience when it comes to the fundamental deconstruction of our most fundamental institutions":

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