Culture and Media Institute

MRC: 'The World's Gayest High School' on Glee Is an Insult to William McKinley

It is the job of Andrew Collins of the right-wing Media Research Center to watch shows like Glee and The New Normal, and then complain about them being too gay.

In his latest post, Collins attacks an episode of Glee for having a “particularly large dose of gay” and says that the high school is an insult to its namesake, President William McKinley, as it is “The World’s Gayest High School.”

“So many characters play for the other team it's hard to believe that there’ll be any future generations of McKinley High students to mock the Bible and cheer on transgendered [sic] performers,” Collins writes.

He goes on to lament that Kurt’s father stressed “the seriousness and permanence of marriage” when he told Blaine, Kurt’s off-and-on boyfriend, that he shouldn’t ask Kurt to marry him…because “his refusal builds the legitimacy of gay marriage even more.”

Pity William McKinley. Our 25th president was a Civil War hero who successfully prosecuted the Spanish-American War and presided over a booming economy. For his trouble, he was assassinated. Adding insult to injury, he’s the namesake of The World’s Gayest High School.

It’s no secret that “Glee” frequently and flamboyantly pushes a gay agenda. So many characters play for the other team it's hard to believe that there’ll be any future generations of McKinley High students to mock the Bible and cheer on transgendered [sic] performers. But as this season prepares to wrap up this week, things are heating up on "Glee." Last week’s episode featured a particularly large dose of gay.



And finally, in the most overt display of all, Blaine asks Kurt’s father for his son’s hand in marriage. His father is all in favor of the institution, those who support gay marriage are on the right side of history, he says. However, he says no because, like most parents these days, he believes high school is a bit too young for someone to be proposing. If anything, his refusal builds the legitimacy of gay marriage even more because he emphasizes the seriousness and permanence of marriage.

MRC Upset Dan Savage Fields Questions from LGBT Students

The Media Research Center’s Culture and Media Institute has been tracking Savage U, the MTV show where Dan Savage offers sex and relationship advice to inquiring students, and has not liked what it has seen. It seems that the biggest complaint of writer Taylor Hughes is that Savage speaks directly and candidly about sex without pushing the abstinence-only-until-marriage message, but Hughes appears to be especially upset that Savage has “used the show to push the gay agenda.” How so? By having regularly “featured people dealing with LGBT issues, reinforcing in its own little way the myth that gays make up more than a tiny percent of the population.” Disturbed that Savage “often fields questions from gay or lesbian people during the show’s Q & A session,” Hughes goes on to label Savage a “Neanderthal” who is “barbaric and uncivilized”:

Savage has also used the show to push the gay agenda, of course. The show regularly has featured people dealing with LGBT issues, reinforcing in its own little way the myth that gays make up more than a tiny percent of the population. (It’s an effective tactic. About half of all Americans believe nearly 25 percent of the population is gay.) Savage interviewed a lesbian who is now becoming attracted to men, a man who used to date women but now is looking to date men, and a transgendered person in the midst of becoming a woman. He often fields questions from gay or lesbian people during the show’s Q & A session.



Surely his most recent attack on Republicans will only further solidify his role in the liberal media. On Monday, June 25, he attacked gay Republicans in an article titled “On Booze, Meth, Suicide ... and GOProud” stating, “like gay meth addicts who aren't satisfied harming only themselves, the boys at GOProud aren't satisfied harming only themselves. They want to harm other gay people—they want to harm all gay people—by getting Mitt Romney elected.”

Dan Savage is what his name indicates, barbaric and uncivilized, yet the liberal media accepts and endorses him because he is a cultural progressive. MTV and its ilk would give a Neanderthal a show about table etiquette, provided he hated conservatives enough.

Media Research Center Intensifies Campaign Against Glee

The Media Research Center is once again attacking the show Glee for its portrayal of gay and bisexual characters. The MRC’s Paul Wilson, writing for the organization’s Culture and Media Institute, appears to consider any depiction of the show’s characters that doesn’t kowtow to the MRC’s anti-gay sensibilities to somehow be an attack on Christianity and the Bible, accusing Glee of leading a “campaign against traditional sexual morality” and “mocking the Bible.” He lamented that in the last episode of Glee the “gay lifestyle was pushed on viewers” and said the show is fully committed to “pushing homosexual propaganda on its viewers”:

The TV musical “Glee” has a long history of pushing the envelope on sexual matters and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. The Valentine’s Day episode of Glee, titled “Heart,” marked a new low in Glee’s campaign against traditional sexual morality, by mocking the Bible.

A lesbian student, Santana asked a group of Christians called the “God Squad” to sing for her girlfriend as part of a “singing telegram” performance. The idea didn’t sit well with a new homeschooled student, who conveniently fit all the stereotypes liberals have of homeschoolers (the unsocialized, barefoot son of a Bible salesman who listens to talk radio but doesn’t own a TV). His reluctance sparked a conversation among the so-called “God Squad” about the Bible’s teachings on homosexuality.

The students of the “God Squad” claimed to respect his decision – and then mocked the Bible’s relevance on homosexuality.



The episode was full of “Glee’s” usual instances where the gay lifestyle was pushed on viewers, featuring lesbian kissing in the hallways and a student coming out that he was gay. Lesbian cheerleader Santana complained: “All I want to be able to do is kiss my girlfriend, but I guess no one can see that, because there’s such an insane double standard at this school.”

In a singularly ironic way, she’s right. There is an insane double standard at that school – in favor of the homosexual lifestyle.

By mocking the Bible, “Glee” has gone further down the rabbit hole in pushing homosexual propaganda on its viewers.

Perhaps the Media is Just Covering What Republicans are Talking About

Last week, the Culture and Media Institute released a report entitled "Baptism by Fire" which complained that media outlets were covering the faith issues as they relate to the Republican primary battle in a different manner then it was covered during the Democratic primary battle in 2008:

With the 2012 elections less than a year away, the liberal media are attacking President Obama's potential opponents on a number of fronts, but especially on religion.

ABC, CBS and NBC have used religion in two ways, either painting the field of GOP primary challengers as a God Squad of religious zealots or playing up differences in their faith. Whether they're letting viewers know that "Rick Perry's gonna have to answer some questions about the people" he prays with, fretting that God "told Michele Bachmann," to enter politics, or devoting no less than 40 segments to the question of whether Mormonism is "a cult" or if "Mitt Romney is a Christian," the networks have repeatedly used faith against the GOP field.

Media preoccupation with the GOP candidates' faith is the exact opposite of how they covered (or didn't) candidate Obama's 20-year attendance at the church of a racist, anti-American pastor who subscribed to "black liberation theology," or Obama's half-Muslim heritage.

The Media Research Center's Culture and Media Institute studied network news reporting on the GOP candidates and religion from Jan. 1-Oct. 31, 2011, and compared it to coverage of the Democratic presidential primary candidates over the same period in 2007. The discrepancy, in both the amount and tone of the coverage, was striking. Network reporters, so disinterested in the beliefs of Obama and his rivals for the 2008 nomination, took every opportunity to inject religion into their coverage of the GOP field.

The obvious response to this allegation would be to point out that the media probably writes a lot more about the faith of Republican candidates because Republicans candidates regularly use their faith as part of their campaigns.

After all, Rick Perry just released two ads about his faith and organized a massive public prayer rally earlier this year, while Michele Bachmann was just on James Dobson's radio program talking about the importance of a "biblical worldview."  For his part, Newt Gingrich regularly uses his faith as part of his campaign while Mitt Romeny's Mormonism continues to be an issue to various Religious Right activists.  In fact, just last month, most of the Republican contenders gathered for a "Thanksgiving Family Forum" hosted by several Religious Right groups where they spent several hours discussing nothing but their faith.

So the reason the press writes more about the faith of Republican candidates probably has a lot to do with the fact that Republican candidates make faith a large part of their campaigns ... but admitting that would pretty much undermine the entire premise of CMI's report, which is why, when CMI's Matt Philbin was on The Janet Mefferd Program yesterday and she raised this rather obvious point, he struggled to explain that it was still a double standard because Democrats are "supposedly" just as religious as Republicans:

Mefferd: Now I wonder if that fact that you have a number of GOP hopefuls who are very, you know, open about their faith - you have Michele Bachmann, you have Rick Perry, you have Herman Cain (you have Herman Cain,) you have Mitt Romney - could it be construed that faith is more of an issue in this election because they are more candidates talking about it?

Philbin: Well, in any GOP primary battle, they do talk about it more, certainly, then Democrats do. In Iowa, they're going to evangelical conservatives and they certainly are not going to be reticent about their faith. But the problem is that the Democrats are, supposedly, just as religious, they have a need to appeal to almost the very same people, so for the networks not to cover the religion of the Democrats while they are covering the religion of the Republicans is a strange double standard.

One of CMI's recommendations in this report is that "reporters should refrain from injecting religion where it doesn't belong" ... but apparently reporters should also be writing a lot about the faith views of Democratic candidates even if those views tend not to play nearly as prominent a role in their campaigns as compared to Republicans. 

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