National Organization of Marriage

NOM Pads Its Résumé

The National Organization for Marriage has been facing some fundraising difficulties since its goal of stopping marriage equality in the U.S. has become increasingly futile. So perhaps that’s why NOM’s president, Brian Brown, had to struggle a bit to find accomplishments to boast of in a year-end fundraising message he sent to supporters today.

In the video message, Brown boasts that his group turned out “tens of thousands of people” to attend this year’s March for Marriage in Washington. At the time, the group estimated that it had attracted a crowd of 10,000; authorities declined to confirm the number and other observers placed it at closer to 6,000.

Brown also inexplicably asserts that one of NOM’s greatest triumphs in 2015 was “helping to free Kim Davis,” the Kentucky clerk who was briefly jailed after defying court orders to allow her office to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. NOM did circulate a petition on Davis’ behalf and raise money for her, but her legal representation came from the right-wing legal group Liberty Counsel and she was only released from detention after her deputies agreed to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

In any case, Brown said that NOM has big plans for the future, repeating his goals to elect a president (preferably Ted Cruz) who will nominate Supreme Court justices to “reverse the same-sex marriage ruling,” pressure the GOP to continue standing against marriage equality, “stop the persecution of people who refuse to be involved in the lie of same-sex marriage” and work toward a constitutional amendment reversing Obergefell.

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