Wallbuilders

David Barton Will Be Training Christians To Conquer The 'Mountain' Of Government

A few weeks ago, we noted that a Christian college in Arkansas had launched the "David Barton School of Political Science" ... and that, yes, that is its actual name.

On his radio program today, Barton revealed that this program is just one of many that he is helping to found and coordinate at Christian colleges around the country, including one at Andrew Wommack's Charis Bible College in Colorado where Barton is setting the curriculum and will serve as a part-time instructor at the "School of Practical Government."

When Barton and Wommack discussed the new program recently, Barton explicitly linked it to Seven Mountains Dominionism, which he has preached before

Seven Mountains theology teaches that Christians are to take control of the seven primary institutions, or "mountains," that shape and control our culture — (1) Business; (2) Government; (3) Media; (4) Arts and Entertainment; (5) Education; (6) Family; and (7) Religion — and use them to implement biblical standards and spread the Gospel. 

Christians, Barton said, have not had much success in taking over the government "mountain" and that is why he and Wommack have started a school to provide activists with the practical skills they'll need to go out and put government "back in the position God wants it."

"The need for it is pretty simple," Barton explained. "A lot, in the Christian community, we hear about the Seven Mountains or the Seven Mountains of Influence and it really is the deal that when they went into the Promised Land, there were these seven mountains that had to be conquered and you look at them today and you say, well, that's business, that's education, that's government, that's media, that's whatever. One of them is government and that's something that we've stayed away from for a long time. Proverbs 29:2 says that when the wicked rule, the people groan; it doesn't take a hearing aid to hear all the groaning going on. It's because the righteous have not been involved."

Barton's school will train students in what the Bible teaches about the role and purpose of government so that "when they come out of here, [they] can go make a positive impact in restoring the nation, putting it back in the position God wants it, in a position that righteousness exalts a nation."

David Barton: If You Tithe, God Will Bless You With A Car That Goes 200,000 Miles

On a recent episode of his "Foundation of Freedom" series, David Barton explained to Glenn Beck how, if Christians tithe properly, they will find themselves being rewarded by God with cars that don't break down as often and clothing that will last longer before wearing out.

"Everybody is supposed to pay their 10 percent to God," Barton stated. "And we don't pay that because God needs it, Deuteronomy says you're to pay the tithe, you do that to learn to be Me first. God says the reason you pay the tithe is so that you learn to put Me at the top of what you do."

"I love the example with Cain and Abel," he continued, "he said that Abel brought the first fruits of the flocks and God was pleased with that. It said that Cain, in the course of time, brought the crops to God and God wasn't pleased with what Cain did. So when you do it first thing off of the top, God can really bless that. And I've seen that. We both tithe, we know the benefits of that, suddenly your cars go 200,000 miles rather than 80,000 miles, your clothes don't wear out as fast. It's what the Bible says, [the Israelites] went for 40 years and their sandals never wore out."

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 3/25/16

  • Ted Cruz has accused "Donald Trump and his henchmen" of planting a false story in the National Enquirer alleging that Cruz has engaged in several extramarital affairs. Trump, of course, denies any involvement.
  • Speaking of Trump, Ben Carson is actually trying to take credit for supposedly convincing him to act more presidential. 
  • Timothy Buchanan says that Trump is the only one who can "break the back of an old political warhorse like El Diablo, Hillary Clinton."
  • Glenn Beck continues to insist that "no real Christian" would ever support Trump.
  • Finally, David Barton invites you to join him for his next "Pastors' Briefing," where you can hear various members of Congress discuss the importance of waging spiritual warfare:

David Barton Says Toyota's Prius Commercial Is Feeding A 'Distaste For Authority'

David Barton invited Bishop Harry Jackson on to his "WallBuilders Live" radio program today to promote his "Operation Blue Shield" effort, which seeks to bring "citizens, governments, law enforcement and first responders ... together to reduce crime."

Prior to interviewing Jackson, Barton lamented that American culture is feeding a "distaste for authority," pointing to a commercial run by Toyota during the Super Bowl featuring a group of bank robbers trying to outrun the police in a Prius.

"The distaste for authority that we're feeding in a very cultural way," he said. "If you look even at the Prius commercials that are running right now, they're humorous commercials, they're creative, but it all starts with some guys trying to rob a bank and while they were trying to rob the bank, their car got towed and so they have to jack a Prius and now the cops haven't been able to catch them. And so commercial after commercial, you've got the cops chasing these four guys in a Prius and the guys inside are just on a vacation, having fun. It all started with them robbing a bank! Now how is that a good deal? That's, again, breaking laws, rejecting authority, and so we're sending the wrong message all the way around."

Yet Again, David Barton Falsely Claims The Average Welfare Family Receives $61,000 A Year In Benefits

On his radio program last week, Glenn Beck dedicated a segment to ripping Donald Trump as a man who simply doesn't care about the truth of anything that he says, asserting that Trump is rarely called out for his lies and when, he is, neither he nor his supporters really even care about his rampant dishonesty.

"The truth doesn't matter to him," Beck said. "The truth is completely irrelevant to Donald Trump."

At the time, we thought that pretty much the same thing could be said about Beck's good pal, David Barton, who also seems to have no qualms about repeating demonstrable falsehoods over and over again because he knows that his supporters will reflexively accept anything he says while ignoring all the criticism that his work receives.

And nothing better demonstrates this very point than the most recent episode of Barton's "Foundations of Freedom" series, in which he was joined by none other than Glenn Beck and where he repeated, for the fourth time, his false claim that families on welfare receive $61,000 a year in government benefits.

"Right now, if you're on welfare in America," Barton stated, "there are 80 anti-poverty programs in America. Those 80 anti-poverty programs, spread out over the poor, the average amount that goes through those poverty programs to those who are designated to be poor,  $61,000 a year. The poor in America, right now, make more that the starting salary of a teacher in 11 states, more than the starting salary of a secretary in 39 states. If you're in Hawaii, unless you're making a salary of over $61,000 a year, there is no reason for you to get off poverty."

As we have pointed out every time we have heard Barton make this assertion, this entirely misleading claim was first put forth by the Republicans on the Senate Budget Committee back in 2012 and was, as the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explained, derived by relying on "a series of serious manipulations of the data that violate basic analytic standards and are used to produce a potentially inflammatory result."

But the simple fact that this claim is totally false is not going to stop Barton from endlessly repeating it ... nor will it stop Beck from gladly standing with him.

David Barton Claims That 'Biblical Teachings' Have Reduced Violent Crime In Las Vegas By 75 Percent

Last month, right-wing psuedo-historian David Barton appeared on "The Patriot and The Preacher" radio program, where he claimed that "biblical teachings" were responsible for a 75 percent reduction in violent crime in the city of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Barton said that he was "a math and science guy" before God "providentially" led him into the study of American history, prompting him to reiterate his claim that it was in this capacity that he discovered that the removal of mandatory prayer from public schools was responsible for a steep decline in academic achievement. For example, Barton believes that the end of school-sponsored prayer led to a significant drop in SAT scores.

Barton claimed that he could prove this via "double causation," which he later called "double correlation," by showing that just as removing organized prayer from public schools leads to lower test scores, adding the "God factor" to schools increases test scores.

"There appears to be a God factor in this thing," he said, "and we were able to document actually 47 categories of government-kept statistics that plummeted at that point in time when we told God to take a hike. Apparently He did and it hasn't worked out too well for us since then. But when God is reintroduced back into policy, for instance, in Las Vegas, the churches there worked with the police department to teach morals in the city, the violent crime rate has gone down 75 percent in Las Vegas by the reintroduction of biblical teachings back in the city through the police department and the churches."

As usual, it is almost impossible to determine where Barton is getting this information since he never bothers to cite any sources, but our best guess is that he is referring to a recent documentary called "Vegas Vikings" about a community outreach effort that claims to have reduced the crime rate by 75 percent in one Las Vegas neighborhood.

David Barton Falsely Claims He's Been Labeled A Hate Group By The FBI

Last month, David Barton spoke at a Christian men's conference called "Testing of the Bulls," where he falsely claimed that his WallBuilders organization has been designated as a hate group by the FBI for opposing gay marriage.

"In this culture, in this day," Barton said, "if you speak out, you will be attacked. There is no question about it. The other side has found one of the greatest political tools that exists is being able to harass you for what you believe and what you say, so we don't want to say certain things."

Barton then once again repeated his false claim that a nondiscrimination ordinance passed in San Antonio, Texas, fines Christians who oppose marriage equality $500 a day and prohibits them from serving in public office, before claiming that he's now been tagged as a hate group by the FBI.

"Look me up," he said. "The FBI has got me on their site. I'm one of the hate groups in America. They just came out with a new list for this year, I'm on the list as a hate group because I think marriage should be between a man and a woman."

For some reason, that elicited a rousing round of applause from the audience as Barton then claimed that "they use my name at military briefings when they talk about domestic terrorists."

None of this, of course, is true. Barton was merely once listed as one of "30 new activists heading up the Religious Right" in a report from the Southern Poverty Law Center but has somehow managed to spin that out into a claim that he's been labeled a domestic terrorist by the federal government.

David Barton And Michele Bachmann Explain Why Christians Must Only Elect 'God-Conscious People'

On the latest episode of his "Foundations of Freedom" series, right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton was once again joined by former Rep. Michele Bachmann to discuss the topic of "God and government" and how "we, as a nation, have a duty not to be secular."

God and religion are to be infused through all of society and government, Barton and Bachmann said, explaining that the best way to achieve that result is by electing Christians.

"We need to elect people to office who are willing to acknowledge God," Barton said, "because if they're secular going in, they're not going to protect your liberties."

"Amen," replied Bachmann, saying that Christians should "elect people who are pre-lobbied to do the right thing." The easiest way to do that, she said, is for Christians to gather together groups of 25 or 50 voters and then ask candidates for public office to come and speak to them so that they can ask those candidates about their views.

Barton supported that idea because "that's an easy way to find out whether they're God-conscious people and if they're not, you don't want them in government because they'll take your liberties."

"And that's the point," Bachmann declared. "You are more protected in this society if you have people who respect the law and who respect the Lawgiver than if you have someone who believes they are law unto themselves. That's what we want!"

David Barton Says It's The Role Of Judges To 'Render Judgment For God'

On the latest episode in his "Foundations of Freedom" series, right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton asserted that the judiciary has lost its way because judges and juries have forgotten that they are to "render judgement for God" and rule according to the Bible.

Barton, who heads a super PAC backing Ted Cruz, and Vanderbilt professor Carol Swain, who serves on the Cruz campaign's "Religious Liberty Advisory Council," were discussing the topic of "the Bible and the judiciary" when Barton declared that people no longer trust the judiciary because "judges themselves have left God out of the picture," which Swain blamed on the fact that judges are being "educated at institutions where they come out as secular humanists, and so there's no fear of God."

"God is a god of justice," Barton said, "and when judges forget that they render judgement for God, you no longer get justice in courts."

'Blacks Were Not Able To Free Themselves, Whites Did': David Barton Credits Whites For Ending Slavery

Glenn Beck had right-wing pseudo-historian and Ted Cruz super PAC operative David Barton on his television program last night to honor Black History Month by uncovering the "real" history of race relations in America. Barton's coverage of this issue was, as always, laughably one-sided and misleading, as he spent a good deal of the opening segment relating tales of white slave owners who supposedly had such friendly relationships with their slaves that they didn't even consider them to be slaves, but rather members of the family.

The slaves, of course, were quite aware that they were slaves but "the whites just thought they were one of the family," as Barton put it, apparently believing that that somehow proves that race relations were not nearly as bad during the founding era as is commonly believed.

Nothing better exemplifies Barton's warped historical view than the fact that he credits white members of Congress and white voters for passing the 13th and 14th Amendments which ended slavery and granted citizenship to former slaves, respectively.

"I love the fact that in these early paintings you have, it's black and white together," Barton declared. "We didn't have what we have today where we have to break you into groups somehow. Yeah, there was bad and ugly down in the South, but my gosh, why not teach the good?"

Barton then picked up a diary owned by a former slave named Richard Allen who he paraphrased as having declared that "so much of the credit that blacks owed was for whites having gone to bat and doing things for them."

"Blacks were not able to free themselves, whites did," Barton stated. "When you get the 13th Amendment, you know, it was nothing but two-thirds of the House, whites in the House were the only ones voting, two-thirds of the whites in the house, two-thirds of the whites in the Senate and three-fourths of the whites in the states that ratified the 13th Amendment to end slavery. And then you have the 14th Amendment, it was nothing but two-thirds of the whites in the House, two-thirds of the whites in the Senate, three-fourths of the whites [in the states.] And so the notion that it's black against white is not borne out by history, but we have made it that way in the way we portray history."

Of course, "blacks were not able to free themselves" because many were slaves who had no rights. Crediting whites for eventually ending that system while pretending that whites and blacks had a congenial and equitable relationship all along is utterly absurd.

The David Barton School Of Political Science Is Now An Actual Thing

Ecclesia College, a Christian college in Arkansas, is excited to announce that in the fall of 2016, it will be launching the David Barton School of Political Science!

Seriously

Ecclesia College is excited to announce the launch of the new David Barton School of Political Science. The school’s initial degree offering will be a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, beginning in the Fall of 2016, and available either on campus or online.

Our degree in Political Science prepares students for employment in politics, public administration, and public policy – careers that can allow you to influence the course of history. Build a foundation of knowledge in American politics while learning how to integrate your Christian faith into the public arena from faculty currently practicing in the profession. You will examine, analyze, and debate relevant issues in current affairs and policy-making through the lens of a biblical worldview. Complete your degree by applying your newly-developed understanding and skills with an internship in local or state government to gain hands-on exposure to policy-making and cultural development.

Come learn to make history.

Barton, the right-wing pseudo-historian whose work is so shoddy that his latest book was pulled by its publisher, sits upon the Ecclesia board of regents and is thrilled to annouce the new political science program bearing his name:

Does David Barton Have A Ph.D.? Even He Doesn't Seem To Know

Last year, we posted a clip of Glenn Beck claiming that his good friend, right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton of WallBuilders, possessed a Ph.D. in history and education. As we noted at the time, that must have come as a surprise to Barton himself, since just months earlier he had admitted that he does not have a Ph.D.

It seems that Beck is not the only one confused about this issue, as Barton appeared on TheDove TV's "Focus Today" program earlier this week and asserted that he both does and does not have a Ph.D. In fact, Barton only has bachelor's degree in Christian education from Oral Roberts University.

Barton was promoting the re-release of his book "The Jefferson Lies," which was pulled by its original publisher back in 2012 due to concerns to its factual inaccuracies, when he was asked by host Perry Atkinson how academics react to his work.

"Usually they say, 'You haven't been trained in history, you don't have a Ph.D.,'" Barton replied. "Well, that's true. All I've got is the original documents. I'm sorry, I don't have a Ph.D.; actually, I do have a Ph.D. but I've got the original documents as well. I just don't consider myself an academic; I consider myself a lover of truth."

As far as we know, the only "Ph.D." that Barton possess is an Honorary Doctorate of Letters he received several years ago from Pensacola Christian College. 

Bryan Fischer Wants Every Member Of Congress To Have To Pass A Test Administered By David Barton Before Taking Office

On his radio program yesterday, Bryan Fischer took a call from a listener who suggested that every lawyer that works for the federal government ought to be required to attend and pass a class taught by right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton before being hired.

Fischer, of course, thought that was a great idea and suggested that it ought to apply to every member of Congress as well.

"I like your idea," Fischer told the caller. "Everybody, before they take their seat in the halls of Congress, ought to pass an exam on the history of the United States and on the Constitution of the United States administered by David Barton and WallBuilders. I mean, that ought to be a minimum."

"Let's see to it," he declared, "that every congressman has to pass a test on the history of the United States and the Constitution administered by our good friends at WallBuilders."

Michele Bachmann Says Progressive Taxation Causes People To Violate The Ten Commandments

In the latest episode of his "Foundations of Freedom" series, right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton was once again joined by Michele Bachmann, who railed against the progressive income tax as an unbliblical system that causes Americans to violate the Ten Commandments.

Barton and Bachmann, a former Republican congresswoman from Minnesota, were discussing the topic of "economics and the Bible" and spent most of the program attacking progressive taxation for violating the economic laws set out in the Bible by placing Americans into different groups and tax brackets instead of treating them as individuals. 

"God loves the individual," Bachmann said, "and He wants the individual to succeed, He wants the family to succeed. And when government stops looking at us as an individual with a name and now we become a number, in other words, we become a part of a group association, then what's dangerous about that is if our group association isn't pleasing to the current government power, you get whacked!"

After Barton cited a Supreme Court case striking down the income tax prior to the passage of the 16th Amendment, Bachmann warned that a progressive income tax is unbliblical because it encourages the government to tax the rich to benefit the poor, which makes people covet their neighbor's possessions in violation of the Tenth Commandment.

"Just look at any campaign commercial on TV," Bachmann said. "It's appealing to the lower interests of man and it appeals to the American people to violate the Tenth Commandment. We are told, don't covet; in other words, don't be jealous and don't want what your neighbor has. Your neighbor had to work for what he has and don't be jealous of your neighbor, get out and work yourself. Instead, politicians say, 'Oh no, no, your neighbor is rich because he stole it from you.' That's not true, it's a lie, and so does anyone benefit from that thinking? Absolutely not. The Bible is exactly right."

David Barton Falsely Claims Justice Breyer Acknowledged That 'The Bill Of Rights Came Out Of The Bible'

Last year, we posted a clip of David Barton falsely claiming that Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer had stated in a court decision that "we all know that all of our due processes clauses in our Bill of Rights came out of the Bible." At the time, Barton failed to cite the case in which Breyer supposedly made this assertion, but we guessed that Barton was citing Breyer's 1999 concurrence in Lilly v. Virginia, in which he stated that "the right of an accused to meet his accusers face-to-face is mentioned in, among other things, the Bible, Shakespeare, and 16th and 17th century British statutes, cases, and treatises."

As we noted at the time, Breyer was not asserting that "all of our due process in our Bill of Rights came out of the Bible," but was simply acknowledging that the right to face one's accuser is mentioned in the Bible and elsewhere.

Of course, Barton is never one to let the facts get in the way of promoting his agenda and so we were not surprised to see Barton repeat this claim in his most recent episode of his "Foundations of Freedom" series, where he actually exaggerated Breyer's point even further to now claim that Breyer had asserted that "we know all of the Bill of Rights came out of the Bible":

In this instance, Barton actually cited the supposed source, which was indeed the Lilly v. Virginia decision and which anyone can look up and read for themselves to see that Breyer in no way made the assertion that Barton initially claimed last year, much less the even more outrageously false version that Barton put forth in his most recent DVD series. 

David Barton Says America Cannot Legalize Abortion Or Homosexuality Because They Violate God's 'Fixed Moral Law'

On the latest installment of his "Foundations of Freedom" series, David Barton echoed the claim put forth by former Rep. Michele Bachmann in an earlier episode when she stated that America can never enact laws that legalize things like abortion or gay marriage because they contradict the moral law established by God.

In the latest episode, Barton and his co-host Rick Green asserted that both homosexuality and abortion violate the "laws of nature," which Barton once again laughably claimed was directly incorporated into the Constitution through the Seventh Amendment. As such, Barton proclaimed, the Constitution explicitly prohibits the government or the people from ever enacting any law that violates God's "fixed moral law." 

"You can't have a majority vote on whether we're going to have liberty or whether we're going to have a right to defend yourself," Barton said. "You can't vote on inalienable rights that come from God. You also can't vote on whether abortion is right or wrong or whether homosexuality is right or wrong; that's a fixed moral law."

Michele Bachmann Says Congress Cannot Pass Laws That Contradict The Laws Of God

In the latest installment of David Barton's "Foundations of Freedom" series to air on the Trinity Broadcasting Network, Barton was once again joined by ex-Rep. Michele Bachmann, who declared that Congress can never pass laws that violate the laws of God because doing so only "degrades the greatness of a nation."

Bachmann declared that a marble portrait of Moses in the House chamber is there as a reminder to all lawmakers that "a holy God gave to Moses the moral law, the Ten Commandments, the law upon which every other law has descended and upon which no other law, if it violates that moral law, could stand because that is the ultimate law."

To pass laws that do not uphold God's moral law, Bachmann said, "degrades us as a nation, it degrades our liberties and it degrades the greatness of a nation and that's what God understood from Old Testament times: The greatness of a nation is built up by His law."

Michele Bachmann: Protecting Gay People With Hate Crimes Laws Is 'Tyranny'

Right-wing psuedo-historian and Republican political operative David Barton recently released an 18-part DVD series called "Foundations of Freedom" that features Barton and various guests explaining everything from "the formation of American law and the judicial system to biblically-based economics, science, government [and how] our Founding Fathers used the Bible as a blueprint for America’s freedoms."

Among the guests featured in the series is Michele Bachmann, who was still a member of Congress at the time of filming, and who, in an episode that recently aired on TBN, declared that LGBT-inclusive hate crimes laws are a form of "tyranny."

"That's what's so brilliant about our form of government and God's form of government," Bachmann said, "that we are equal before the law. God's says He's not a respecter of persons, He's not partial, so why should we, why should government be partial? ... A creator God created us equal."

That discussion eventually led to Barton and Bachmann to lament the passage of hate crimes legislation back in 2009 that included protections against crimes based on sexual orientation, which Bachmann declared was tyranny.

"It's political correctness that rules the day," she said. "So when you're part of a favored group, then you get special benefits that nobody else gets. That's the very form of tyranny because when government supposedly gives something — government has nothing to give, they have to take it away from other people. So when they give it to that certain group, that means, by definition, they're taking it away from you."

The hate crimes law, which Barton and other anti-gay activists falsely claimed would lead to the imprisonment of pastors who preach from the Bible, did not "give" anything to specific groups nor take anything away from anyone else, but merely added sexual orientation and gender identity to other characteristics covered by existing hate crimes statutes, such as gender, race, religion, disability and national origin.

Cruz Virginia Campaign Leader Rails Against 'Socialized Education System' And Homosexuality's 'Prevention Of The Seed'

Every year, Republican activist and Religious Right pseudo-historian David Barton gathers conservative state legislators at a “ProFamily Legislator’s Conference” to learn about model legislation along with “current public policy issues in a manner that honors our Judeo-Christian heritage and the vision of our Founding Fathers.”

At last year's conference in November, one of the speakers at Barton’s conference was Cynthia Dunbar, a former member of the Texas State Board of Education who has admitted that her goal on the board was to correct a “biblically illiterate society.” Dunbar, who now works at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, was named a Virginia state co-chair of Ted Cruz’s presidential campaign last month, aligning her further with Barton, who chairs a pro-Cruz super PAC.

In her speech at Barton’s conference, which Barton broadcast on his “Wallbuilders Live” program last week, Dunbar urged legislators to get involved in education in order to stop the “deception of the seed” by “our socialized education system.”

“I believe it’s a crucial issue for several reasons,” she said. “One, it’s what I call the seed policy, if you think about it, every major social issue you’re encountering as legislators actually directs back to what it talks about it in Genesis, ‘if I would put enmity between you and the seed of the woman.’ Because what happens, what is abortion? Abortion is the destruction of the seed. What is homosexuality? It is the prevention of the seed. And what is education? It is potential deception of the seed.”

“And so when we have 88 to 90 percent, which is approximately the number of the students that are being educated within our socialized education system, effectively indoctrinating our children with our own tax dollars, guess what?” she asked. “We lose every other issue. We lose life, we lose marriage, we lose all of it. So I think this is the linchpin issue.”

Dunbar also put in a plug for teaching public school kids Barton’s signature spin on American history, saying that the “brilliant” Barton had discovered that “94 percent of the quotes of the founding fathers” were “either directly or indirectly” related to the Bible.

“One of my favorite historians, brilliant, brilliant man, says that 94 percent of the quotes of the founding fathers contemporaneous to our nation’s founding were either directly or indirectly from holy scripture,” she declared. “We know what that means when we say ‘directly,’ they’re quoting scripture. What does it mean when we say ‘indirectly’? They were quoting men who were quoting scripture.”

Unsurprisingly, this Barton “fact” — which also turns up in a book written by Dunbar — is the product of some of Barton’s trademark misinterpretation topped off by some fuzzy math .

We Read Rafael Cruz's Book So You Don't Have To

Rafael Cruz, father of senator and presidential candidate Ted Cruz, has become a folk hero in his own right among Religious Right activists as he has barnstormed the country railing against Barack Obama, gay rights activists, and other favored enemies of the far right — and promoting his son’s presidential candidacy. Rafael’s new book, “A Time for Action: Empowering the Faithful to Reclaim America,” will be officially released by WND Books in January, but we at RWW have saved you the time, money and aggravation by reading it for you. Happy New Year!

If you’ve watched Rafael Cruz or his son at all, there’s not much new or surprising in Rafael’s book. It is essentially a book-length pitch for his son’s candidacy, beginning with a gushing foreword from Glenn Beck — “Rafael Cruz is one of the greatest freedom fighters of his generation” and “Ted Cruz will do anything to protect and preserve freedom” — to an epilogue from Ted Cruz, which reads like a reprint of his presidential campaign’s stump speech. Rafael says in the book that he has known since Ted was a young boy that he had “a special calling on his life.”

Rafael is not shy in his political pronouncements. The Democratic Party “promotes an ungodly socialist agenda that is destroying America,” he declares. “And unfortunately, there are those in the Republican Party who aren’t much different.” That is why, he says, it is even more important to vote in primary elections than in the general election, because the primary “gives you the opportunity to select the candidates that best align with biblical and constitutional principles.” Rafael, and Ted in his campaign-speech epilogue, repeat their assertion that 54 million evangelical voters stayed home on Election Day 2012 and that getting more of them to vote is the key to putting the government back in the hands of a “righteous” president.

In between Glenn Beck and Ted Cruz, the book is part memoir of Rafael’s possibly embroidered past as a freedom-fighter against Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista and part evangelical religious tract. This is supplemented by plenty of recycled Christian-nation historical claims made by GOP activist David Barton, the often discredited “historian” who is currently running a pro-Ted Cruz super PAC. Barton and his Christian-nation history are repeatedly cited by Rafael, who writes:

I believe without a shadow of a doubt that the reason the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States have lasted over two centuries is that they were divinely inspired and then written by men who had spent time on their knees. These were men of God seeking revelation from God, and that’s what He gave them. Of course, these two documents aren’t equivalent to the Word of God, but God certainly directed the men who crafted them.

Also cited in “A Time for Action” is Christian-nation advocate and political strategist David Lane, who is trying to mobilize an army of conservative pastors to run for office, which he hopes will in turn bring out conservative evangelical volunteers and voters. Lane has also been, with FRC’s Tony Perkins, a major promoter of the effort to get Religious Right leaders to unite around a single candidate — a step taken earlier this month when dozens of them voted in a secret endorsement meeting to back Ted Cruz.

Rafael talks about the dangers of secular humanism and makes a glancing reference to Seven Mountains dominionism, the belief that conservative Christians must gain control over the "seven mountains" of American culture.

In no way, shape, or form was Jefferson implying that the church should be restricted from exerting an influence upon society. On the contrary, the Bible tells us that we are the salt of the earth and light of the world…Doesn’t that suggest that our influence should touch every area of society – our families, the media, sports, arts and entertainment, education, business, and government?”

Like Barton and Lane, Rafael makes his case for the Christian nature of the U.S. government by conflating the Pilgrims and Puritans with the founding fathers who gave us the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution more than 150 years later. Rafael declares that “the concept of separation of church and state is found nowhere in either the Declaration of Independence or the Constitution of the United States of America,” which leads into this:

To understand this clearly, we need to go back four centuries to the time of the first settlers in America. If you lived in England in the early 1600s and were not a member of the Church of England, you would be considered a heretic and subject to persecution. So the early settlers immigrated to the New World in order to freely worship the Lord their God. What a remarkable heritage of religious freedom this exceptional country gives us! The only country on the face of the earth founded on the World of God!

As this new constitutional representative republic stretched its wings following the Revolutionary War, citizens of the thirteen colonies wondered if their new government would impose a state religion upon them like the one their forefathers suffered in England…

That is followed by a discussion of Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists, ending with the Bartonesque conclusion that Jefferson’s wall of separation image “was only referring to a one-way wall.

Rafael’s writing on Cuba is similarly incomplete. He describes the explosion that sank the U.S. Maine in Havana harbor in 1898 as “an unprovoked attack” without any indication that many historians now believe the ship’s boiler exploded and that the “unprovoked attack” story was simply cover for the U.S. to declare war on Spain and bring Cuba under U.S. control. Rafael suggests without offering any evidence that President Obama’s unsuccessful efforts to close the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay suggest that Obama is “complicit” with Raúl Castro’s demands that the U.S. return the military base itself to Cuban control.

“A Time to Act” includes plenty of familiar Religious Right claims: that Supreme Court rulings on state-sponsored prayer and Bible readings in public schools have contributed to America’s downward slide, along with legal abortion and the “redefinition” of traditional marriage.

The book is also full of the hyperbolic rhetoric you’d expect from Rafael Cruz and World Net Daily, the far-right news outlet that serves as his publisher. Jimmy Carter’s policies were “reminiscent of the bearded dictator I had left behind in Cuba” and Obama taking executive action on immigration in the face of congressional inaction “doesn’t sound much different from the old, bearded dictator I left behind in Cuba almost sixty years ago — governing by decree, by fiat, just like Fidel Castro.”

There’s more: America today “is tragically following the same path that Cuba did a half century ago.” The Obama administration has “intensified our progression into an age of lawlessness.” The Obama administration’s nuclear deal with Iran will make it “quite literally, the world’s leading financier of radical Islamic terrorism.” The Supreme Court’s “lawless” and “preposterous” marriage equality decision is “one of the biggest signs of our country’s moral degradation.” The federal government “mandates that teachers affirm alternative, nonbiblical lifestyles, teach evolution as incontrovertible ‘fact,’ and mock the notion that God created the heavens and earth.” Common Core is a means for educational elites to “brainwash our students through federally mandated curriculum that extols socialism, globalism, and immorality from a secular humanist worldview.”

Like countless speeches at Religious Right political gatherings, Rafael Cruz places much of the blame for America’s sad state of affairs on pastors who aren’t being aggressive enough in preaching politics from the pulpit. “The time has come,” he writes, “for pastors to again fearlessly preach toward the political landscape, just like their predecessors centuries ago. If they don’t, Satan will rule without opposition in our halls of legislation.”

It is interesting to read the extent to which Ted Cruz is a product of careful grooming since childhood by his father and by far-right organizations. Rafael was active in the Religious Roundtable’s efforts to elect Ronald Reagan, and Ted, then nine years old, heard plenty of dinner conversations about the importance of getting rid of Jimmy Carter and replacing him with Ronald Reagan. Says Rafael, “My son received a dose of constitutionally conservative politics from a biblical worldview every day for a year when he was just nine!” As a kid, Rafael’s friends introduced Ted to the founder of the Free Enterprise Institute and began inculcating him in the teachings of people like Milton Friedman, Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek. Ted was part of a group of five high school students that the Institute sent around Texas giving speeches on free-market economics and the Constitution.

“A Time for Action” also includes a few appendices. One helpfully explains how U.S. government policies — such as progressive income taxes, net neutrality, Amtrak subsidies and the auto industry “bailout” — align with the 10 planks of the Communist Manifesto. Also included, courtesy of David Barton’s Wallbuilders, the letter of the Danbury Baptists to Thomas Jefferson and his response; a sermon preached by colonial pastor Jonas Clark before the battle of Lexington and his account of the battles of Lexington and Concord; and recommended resources, which include Ted Cruz’s “A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Promise of America” as well as books by conservative economists and a few Religious Right organizations, including the Alliance Defending Freedom, David Lane’s American Renewal Project, Wallbuilders, and, of course, WND. Earlier in the book, Cruz promotes other Religious Right groups that produce voter guides or voting records, including Vision America, Liberty Counsel, Liberty Institute, Eagle Forum and Concerned Women for America.

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