Barry Loudermilk

GOPer Says House Looked Into Arresting Eric Holder; Fears Muslim Brotherhood's White House Access

At the town hall meeting where Rep. Barry Loudermilk shared his views on vaccines and IEDs along the southern border last week, he also fielded a question from a constituent who claimed that the Muslim Brotherhood has “penetrated our government” and is “in the Department of Homeland Security.”

The Georgia Republican responded that the while the House would like to investigate such Muslim Brotherhood infiltration of the government, it has been stonewalled by the Obama administration.

Loudermilk said that part of the problem was people like Attorney General Eric Holder, who the House voted in 2012 to hold in contempt. He told his constituents that members of the House had considered arresting Attorney General Eric Holder at last month’s State of the Union address, but were counseled by attorneys that “some other things were going on” in the case of Holder.

“There was a discussion before the State of the Union of, because of holding Eric Holder in contempt, what role will the House play if he shows up on the House Floor for the State of the Union because he’s been held in legal contempt of U.S. Congress,” Loudermilk said. “And there was a discussion, ‘Will the Sergeant-at-Arms arrest him?’ But they checked with some of the attorneys and they said some other things were going on.”

Loudermilk went on to insist that he was particularly worried about the “White House access” of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, which he suggested was a Muslim Brotherhood group (and mistakenly called the Center for Islamic American Studies).

Rep. Barry Loudermilk Boasts About Refusing To Vaccinate His Kids

At a town hall meeting in his district in Georgia last week, Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk claimed that he and his wife decided against vaccinating their “very healthy” children and said that he is against requiring children to receive vaccinations.

“I believe it’s a parents decision whether they immunize or not,” he said in remarks first noted by the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “We didn’t immunize and they’re very healthy, of course, in homeschooling we didn’t have to get the mandatory immunizations.”

Loudermilk also said that as chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight in the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, he would consider holding hearings on a questioner’s allegation that the CDC “falsified data” on the safety of vaccines.

GOP Rep: No IEDs On The Border Because They Might Harm American Workers

At a recent town hall meeting, Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., laughed off a question from a participant who asked whether the U.S. should “learn something from Afghanistan and put IUDs in the ground” along the southern border as a way to stop immigrants from crossing the border and “blow them up.” (She presumably meant IEDs, or improvised explosive devices).

As the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported, the freshman Republican congressman said that he was against the use of improvised explosive devices along the border because they might harm the Americans who live and work there, ignoring the fact that the IEDs would kill immigrants.

Loudermilk told the questioner that he opposed the idea "because there’s a lot of Americans who work [there] and kids around the border as well.”

The Personhood Movement: Where It Comes From And What It Means For The Future Of Choice: Part 1

This is the first post in a RWW series on the reemergence of the anti-choice “personhood” movement and what it means for the future of abortion rights in the U.S.

Part 2: The Personhood Movement: Internal Battles Go Public
Part 3: The Personhood Movement: Undermining Roe In The Courts
Part 4: The Personhood Movement: Regrouping After Defeat

“Welcome to the future of the pro-life movement.”

As a few dozen activists walked into a conference hall in an Atlanta suburb in October 2014, they were met with an optimistic greeting from an impromptu welcoming committee.

It was the founding convention of the Personhood Alliance, an association of anti-abortion groups from 15 states who are determined to wrest back an anti-choice movement that they fear has gone dangerously astray.

The members of the Personhood Alliance felt betrayed.

The largest and best-funded groups opposing abortion rights have, over the past several years, achieved astounding success in chipping away at women’s access to legal abortion in the United States. But these successes, Personhood Alliance’s founders maintain, are too small and have come at a grave cost.

In seeking mainstream approval for anti-choice politics, personhood advocates believe, groups like the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and Americans United for Life (AUL) have adopted a secular tone and downplayed their Christian origins. In focusing on drawing attention to issues like late-term abortion, they may have won some support for the cause but have done little to end the procedures they targeted. In seeking incremental successes, personhood advocates argue, the movement has given up on making a moral argument for the humanity of fertilized eggs and fetuses and lost sight of its larger goal of eliminating legal abortion entirely.

But the greatest betrayal in the eyes of these personhood advocates is the willingness of major anti-choice groups to endorse legislation that includes exceptions for pregnancies resulting from rape and incest. The personhood movement’s leaders contend that these political concessions are not only immoral and intellectually inconsistent, but also threaten to undermine the movement’s goals in the long term. In fact, the Personhood Alliance grew out of a feud between Georgia Right to Life leader Daniel Becker and NRLC centered around a rape exception inserted into a national 20-week abortion ban. Becker and his allies believe that they have a better plan, one that does not require compromise.

Joining the activists at the founding conference was Ben DuPré, the chief of staff for Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who, along with his colleague Justice Tom Parker, has outlined an alternate strategy for eliminating legal protections for abortions in the United States: building a body of laws that define fertilized zygotes and fetuses as citizens with full rights under the law.

On the first night of the Personhood Alliance’s founding convention in October, Paul Broun, then a Republican congressman from Georgia, captured the activists’ anger at the leaders of the anti-choice movement, charging that they had betrayed the movement's core principles to such a degree that it had provoked the wrath of God — and implied that they were doing so for personal gain.

Broun told the activists of a meeting he had had with two leaders of NRLC when he was running for U.S. Congress in 1996. He told them that were he elected, the first bill he would introduce would be a Sanctity of Human Life Act giving personhood rights to fertilized eggs, because [that’s] "how we’re going to overturn Roe v. Wade is by giving the right of personhood to that one-celled human being.” The NRLC leaders, Broun said, told him they wouldn’t support it and he “walked away very disillusioned.”

When an audience member asked Broun why he thought NRLC and other major anti-choice groups weren’t putting their energy behind personhood bills, including one that he helped write, Broun responded that he wasn’t “making any accusations here,” but implied that “pro-life” leaders have a financial incentive to never achieve their declared goal.

Harkening back to that 1996 meeting, he drew a historical parallel:

They never told me [why they wouldn’t back the Sanctity of Human Life Act]. I asked them, and they just said, well, we won’t. And I walked away from that meeting in 1996 very, very disappointed, very disillusioned. And shortly after, actually as I was riding away in a taxi cab, it came to mind, back when I was a kid – looking around the room, I’m not sure anybody’s old enough to remember polio – but when I was a kid I had classmates who got polio who were in iron lungs, and I had patients as a doctor, people who when I was in medical school, were people who had polio.

The biggest charity in this country was an organization called March of Dimes. And they were, their executives were, I guess, I’m not sure, but they were making lots of money, March of Dimes was probably the biggest charity in the country. And a doctor by the name of Jonas Salk developed a vaccine. And suddenly, March of Dimes went broke.

And I went away from that meeting with National Right to Life and I was wondering, I still wonder, I’m not making any accusations here: If we were to stop abortion, what would happen to the jobs of all those people who are getting paid every day to be in the pro-life movement? What would happen? I don’t know if that’s what it is or not, I’m not making any accusations, I’m just telling you what my thought was when I left that meeting.

He told the Personhood Alliance that every day that legal abortion continues, America risks God’s wrath. Discussing his 2013 refusal to vote for a 20-week ban to which the House GOP had added a rape exception at the last minute, Broun said:

If we can save some, let's do it, but let's not make exceptions and that some babies are worth killing and some are not. They're all worth saving.

And then it goes back to 'my people are destroyed for lack of knowledge,' as we hear [from] Hosea 4:6, and that's the reason education is so important. Because we've got to educate the grassroots.

...

You see, God is a holy, righteous God. He cannot continue to bless America while we’re killing over a million babies every single day. Abortion must stop.

(Broun's estimate of one million abortions taking place every day is, to say the least, wildly exaggerated.)

Broun argued that groups like the NRLC are selling the movement short by accepting political compromise bills containing rape and incest exceptions and then pressuring anti-choice lawmakers to vote for those bills.

"The reason a lot of pro-life people are willing to compromise is because of that outside pressure," he said. "Whether it's an endorsement from Concerned Women [for America] or the Family Research Council or another group, or it could be an endorsement of the U.S. Chamber [of Commerce] or it could be the endorsement of any group. Politicians, the major principle that they will not budge from is their reelection. So they will do whatever it takes to get the endorsements, the money that they need to raise.”

Barry Loudermilk, a former Georgia Republican state senator who had recently been elected to the U.S. House, also spoke to the convention, comparing the fight against abortion rights to the struggle of America’s founders, who he said also witnessed “a decline in the moral sensitivity of our nation.” Loudermilk, who while serving in the state senate introduced a personhood amendment that was backed by Georgia Right to Life and Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council, said, “When you look at our movement, we have the exact same things against us that they had against them,” he said. “They had the government against them, the laws, the judges. We don’t have the people who are totally with us, it’s growing. But we have the truth with us. We have Providence with us.”

The congressmen echoed a founding tenet of the Personhood Alliance: that in a movement that was increasingly struggling to appear secular, the organization would be unabashedly “Christ-centered” and “biblically informed.”

As personhood's proponents like to remind their fellow activists, both sides of the movement share the same goal: to completely criminalize abortion. The question is just how to do it.

The largest and best-funded anti-choice groups, deploying a strategy of chipping away at abortion access in the name of “women’s health,” have pushed state legislatures to pass over 200 new restrictions on abortion rights since 2011, many based on model legislation from AUL and NRLC. This strategy has managed to shut down abortion providers (especially in rural areas), make it harder for low-income women to pay for abortion, and erect unnecessary logistical hurdles for even those women who could access and afford abortion care.

The movement also won a pivotal court case with the Supreme Court's ruled that private corporations could deny their employees legally mandated health insurance coverage for contraceptives that the corporations’ owners believe cause abortion. And they did this all while stemming the loss in public opinion that had hindered other “culture war” issues, in part by lifting up female leaders and adopting woman-centered empowerment rhetoric.

But at the same time, another side of the anti-choice movement, those eschewing compromise and incrementalism and pursuing the goal of establishing legal “personhood” from the moment of conception, have suffered a series of embarrassing electoral blows. In 2014, Colorado voters overwhelmingly rejected a ballot measure that would have defined zygotes and fetuses as persons in the state’s criminal code. It was the third time in six years that voters in the state had rejected a “personhood” measure, although its proponents noted that their margin of defeat got smaller each time. Perhaps even more galling for the movement, voters in reliably conservative North Dakota rejected an amendment to provide constitutional protections for “every being at every stage of development” by a whopping 28-point margin. And this all came three years after a personhood initiative was soundly defeated in deep-red Mississippi.

These personhood measures, while sharing the same ultimate goal as the incremental strategy, have become widely seen as politically toxic, in large part because they could threaten access to common forms of birth control. The no-compromise strategy has also become tied to a series of ham-handed comments made by male politicians, most infamously former Missouri Rep. Todd Akin, which further hurt the personhood movement, while providing political cover to those pursuing a more incremental approach.

But despite its spectacular losses at the ballot box, personhood movement strategists maintain that not only is their strategy the morally sound and intellectually consistent one — they believe their strategy is the one that will ultimately swing public opinion and overturn Roe v. Wade.

This series, marking the anniversary of Roe, will explore the recent resurgence of the personhood movement and what it means for the future of abortion rights. Upcoming posts will examine the history of the split in the anti-choice movement and its debates over legal strategy, and the organizations that are currently leading the movement.

GOP Congressman-Elect Barry Loudermilk Will Never Surrender In The War On Christmas

Republican congressman-elect Barry Loudermilk of Georgia wants to reassure his future constituents that he will never give in to the anti-Christmas belligerents. On “Washington Watch” this week, Loudermilk told Josh Duggar that he is looking forward to Christmas despite the left’s best attempts to ruin the holiday.

“It’s always been an honored time but just recently it seems like it has gotten to the point where we have to even defend our rights that are given to us to celebrate the birth of Christ and even just the celebration of Christmas has been under fire by the far-left,” he said.

Loudermilk later said that people throughout the country “lost their sense of hope” and pride but will ultimately persevere, comparing America to George Bailey of “It’s A Wonderful Life.” He added: “There is some momentum that we haven’t seen in many years in this nation that people are just tired of political correctness, they’re tired of having their rights stepped upon and they’re ready for something different.”

Jody Hice, Barry Loudermilk Win GOP Primaries In Georgia

Two candidates with sterling Religious Right credentials won runoff primary elections yesterday to become GOP nominees to the U.S. House in Georgia.

Jody Hice won a primary to succeed Rep. Paul Broun in Georgia’s 10th District, and seems prepared to pick up Broun’s mantle as one of the most far-right members of Congress.

In 2012, Hice wrote a book in which he claimed that gay people have launched a scheme to “sodomize” children and proposed that Muslims be denied First Amendment rights.

Hice, a Baptist pastor, also hosts a syndicated radio show in which he has compared homosexuality to alcoholism and lamented that it “enslaves” people “in a lifestyle that frankly they are not”; blamed school shootings on the end of government-sponsored school prayer; and speculated about the prophetic qualities of “blood moons.”

Hice, who made his name advocating for copies of the Ten Commandments to be displayed in government buildings, once told a newspaper reporter  that a woman should be free to run for public office….as long as she stays “within the authority of her husband.”

And just last week, Hice suggested that the crisis of refugee children at the southern border might need to be dealt with through “Second Amendment” means.

Also winning his GOP primary in Georgia yesterday was state Sen. Barry Loudermilk, who beat former Rep. Bob Barr in a runoff in the 11th District. Loudermilk is an acolyte of fake historian David Barton, who endorsed his campaign. When he won Barton’s endorsement, Loudermilk said, "There is no greater expert on the U.S. Constitution and the underpinnings of American government, than David Barton."

Bob Barr Challenges Barry Loudermilk To Disavow David Barton's Endorsement

Georgia State Senator Barry Loudermilk is currently seeking the Republican Party's nomination for a seat in Congress and has been touting the endorsement he received from "nationally recognized author, historian and constitutional expert David Barton."

Loudermilk's admiration of Barton is no secret, given that he mindlessly repeats Barton's lies in his own presentations, but now it seems that it is becoming an issue in his campaign as he was asked to repudiate Barton's endorsement earlier this week during a debate with his GOP primary opponent, former Congressman Bob Barr.

A clip from the debate was posted on YouTube by Bartowpolitics showing Barr noting that Loudermilk has very proudly accepted Barton's endorsement despite the fact, Barr said, that Barton "has been roundly and uniformly criticized with facts for taking positions that are anti-Semitic [and] that are against women voting."

Barr asked Loudermilk to disavow Barton's endorsement, but Loudermilk refused to do so, saying that he had no idea where Barr was getting his information and saying that Barton "had done a tremendous job of reintroducing Americans to their true heritage ... so, no, I'm not going to stand out here and disavow an endorsement of somebody that I believe has done a tremendous job in reintroducing Americans to their true heritage":

The allegation that Barton spoke to anti-Semitic groups stems back over twenty years and Barton has consistently insisted that he was not aware of the views of some of the groups that he addressed. 

As for the claim that Barton is "against women voting," that comes from an ironically Bartonesque misrepresentation of a radio program he did earlier this year when he asserted that the Founding Fathers did not grant women the right to vote in order "to keep the family together."

We have listened to literally thousands of hours of Barton's programs and presentations and he can be justifiably criticized for a lot of things (most notably, being a serial liar), but being anti-Semitic and against women voting should not be among them.

Right Wing Leftovers - 4/15/14

  • After finally being allowed to enter Canada, Peter LaBarbera got himself arrested for displaying anti-gay and anti-abortion posters and handing out literature on a college campus and then refusing to leave.
  • Glenn Beck says that Congressional candidate Barry Loudermilk reminds him a lot of David Barton (and he thinks that is a good thing.)
  • Rep. Michele Bachmann will speak at Liberty University tomorrow.
  • In the wake of the Brendan Eich controversy, anti-gay activists are calling on Mozilla "to make a clear statement to its employees as to whether this incident is a dog whistle to all pro-marriage, pro-family, pro-life and religious employees and talent to vacate the company or will Mozilla ensure a truly diverse and safe workplace environment for them."
  • We hate to break it to you, Lee Duigon, but nobody is afraid of you; they are mocking you.
  • Finally, Matt Barber tells a Christian publishing company that is reportedly going to publish a book by a gay Christian that it can "no longer call yourself a Christian publishing company. Call yourself a secular publishing company or an anti-Christian publishing company, because what they are doing here is counter biblical, it's anti- Christian and it flies in the face of God's teaching on sexual morality."

Right Wing Leftovers - 9/5/13

  • The American Family Association is ending its three-year long boycott against Home Depot, claiming that the company has stopped making contributions to pro-gay causes.  We look forward to Home Depot responding by pointing out that the AFA is lying.
  • Focus on the Family's Kim Trobee says gay activists are eager to "force an entire nation into submission."
  • David Barton has endorsed Georgia State Senator Barry Loudermilk, which makes sense given that Loudermilk mindlessly repeats Barton's nonsense.
  • Rush Limbaugh literally has a new book coming out entitled "Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims."
  • James Dobson and Liberty University are "working together to build a curriculum based on Dr. Dobson’s writings and body of work."
  • FRC prays that "may the weakening of our armies by homosexual abuse and the decision to put women in bloody combat be reversed by courageous leaders in Congress and the Pentagon's weakening our Armies be reversed."
  • Finally, Bryan Fischer declares that "we are never, ever going to say same-sex marriage is okay":

The Dangers of Getting a PhD in History From David Barton University

Recently, Georgia state Senator Barry Loudermilk appeared on TBN's "Praise the Lord" where he made the rather familiar argument that the Founding Fathers took the concepts of the separation of powers and the three branches of government directly out of the Bible.

Claiming that John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and George Washington all directly cited the Bible as justification for these concepts, Loudermilk asserted that Jeremiah 17:9's claim that "the heart is devious above all else" made the Founder realize the need to divide power among various branches of government, which they took directly from Isaiah 33:22's declaration that "the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our ruler, the Lord is our king":

If that argument seems familiar, it is because it came directly from David Barton, who has made the baseless assertion time and time and time again:

It is untrue every time Barton says it and is equally untrue when Loudermilk mindlessly repeats it.

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