David Barton

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/17/15

  • Warren Throckmorton @Patheos: David Barton’s War on Christian Colleges: Claims Disputed by Focus on the Family Researcher and His Own Book.

David Barton Assures Glenn Beck That The Government Can Outlaw Homosexuality

As we have noted before, Glenn Beck is fond of bragging that he doesn't even know anyone who could be considered to be "anti-gay" despite the fact that he works closely with a great many such people on a regular basis. The only way Beck can plausibly claim not to be aware of the anti-gay views espoused by even close personal friends like David Barton is if he is intentionally choosing not to listen to what they say, which actually seems to be the case.

Last night, Beck featured Barton on his television program for the entire hour and much of the discussion involved efforts to protect the "rights" of Christian business owners to discriminate against gay people in the name of protecting religious liberty. At one point, Barton made the argument that the government is overstepping it jurisdiction by requiring Christians to violate their consciences because that is a right granted to them by God, which he sought to illustrate by comparing it to someone repainting some else's car simply because they didn't like the original color.

Beck agreed, saying that, by the same token, "the government can't say 'you can't be a homosexual' because ... that's how you practice your life."

Not so fast, Barton responded.

"To some degree. But the government has always taken stands on behavior that undermine the government itself," Barton said. "And that's where morality has always ... see, consanguinity, the government's always gotten involved; you can't marry your brother and sister, you can't marry your first cousin. So there's always been things that protect the moral climate of the society ... You've always had standards on behavior":

Barton was very clearly pushing back on Beck's notion that the government has no right to outlaw homosexuality,  which, given Barton's anti-gay rhetoric and belief that our public policy must operate according to the Bible, would only come as a surprise to someone who has intentionally been trying to ignore Barton's well-documented views.

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/15/15

David Barton Once Again Claims That The Bible Says There Will Never Be An AIDS Vaccine

Last month, we posted a clip of David Barton asserting that God will never allow scientists to find a vaccine for HIV/AIDS because such a vaccine would eliminate the divine "penalty" for homosexuality, which would contradict the teaching found in Romans 1.

As "evidence" of this position, the Religious Right psuedo-historian and GOP activist claimed that the virus that causes AIDS is constantly mutating, making it impossible to inoculate against. He pointed to news stories about various failures by researchers to successfully test an experimental vaccine as "proof" of his assertion.

As Warren Throckmorton reported at the time, the stories that Barton cited were utterly unrelated and did not prove his point at all:

In the video, Barton first showed the Popular Science headline and then said:

The headlines came out and said, for the first time ever an HIV vaccine shows success in trial. Oh my gosh, I guess there is, I guess I must have misinterpreted the Bible, cause the Bible’s true, and then six weeks later, they came out with this that says, NIH halts trial of HIV vaccine after it fails to work. The newspaper said it worked but none of the medical evidence said that it worked. So they still don’t have a cure.

The problem with Barton’s presentation is that the second headline didn’t come out “six weeks later.” Rather it came out four years later in 2013 and was about an entirely different attempt to create a vaccine.

The Yahoo News article Barton referred to (the second headline) is only available via Internet Archives and is dated April 26, 2013. The Yahoo article linked to the NIH announcement that the HVTN 505 clinical trial had been halted. The HVTN 505 trial results had nothing to do with the earlier success of RV 144. The RV 144 trial was reported in 2009, the same year that the HVTN 505 started. The NIH has more on the HVTN 505 trial on the NIH website.

Barton got the time frame wrong and made it appear that the two headlines were related to each other.

Barton's claim was entirely false but he continues to repeat it nonetheless, as Throckmorton discovered when Barton spoke at Faith Baptist Church in Knightdale, North Carolina this weekend:

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/10/15

Barton: America Will Collapse Within 80 Years Without 'Premarital Purity And Postmarital Fidelity'

In an interview at a Cleveland Right to Life Event last year, self-proclaimed historian David Barton declared that “no nation” has ever survived more than 80 years past a collapse of “premarital purity and postmarital fidelity.”

“In regards to the moral standing of other democracies, including ancient Rome, how is the United States measuring up today?” an interviewer asked Barton in an edited clip posted on YouTube by the anti-choice group.

“Well, we got real trouble,” Barton responded.

“…Pre-marital purity and post-marital fidelity…no nation, any nation in 5,000 years has ever survived two generations past that, so it’s gone within 80 years,” he said. “So Rome’s the same way.”

The comments start about 20 seconds into the clip:

David Barton Recounts His Days Serving As Translator For Russian National Gymnastic Team And Smuggling Bibles Into Soviet Union

A few months ago, we posted a video of David Barton claiming that he had been part of Oral Roberts University's record-setting men's college basketball team back in the early 1970s, a claim for which we and others have been unable to find any proof.  At the same time, we have also been unable to definitively disprove it, so we really have no way of knowing whether or not any of it is true.

Today, Barton made another extraordinary claim on his "WallBuilders Live" radio program, which we once again can neither verify nor disprove, but that we find genuinely astonishing.  Barton told listeners that he was fluent in Russian when he was younger and even served as an interpreter when the Russian national gymnastics team visited the United States in 1976. On top of that, Barton also claimed that he was actively involved in smuggling Bibles into the former Soviet Union.

Following an interview with a missionary who discussed efforts to introduce the Bible to eastern European countries, Barton chimed in that he too used to be involved in smuggling Bibles into the former Soviet Union.

"That's really where I got started with the Soviet bloc back when the Iron Curtain was up," Barton said. "I was fluent in Russian and when the Russian gymnastic team came to America in 1976, I got to be translator for them and do translating, and just the accounts of what happened when we went to the store was a blast."

This revelation obviously came as an utter surprise to Barton's co-host, Rick Green, who was shocked to discover that Barton speaks Russian ... or rather did speak Russian, as Barton said that "I don't now but I was, at one time, fluent in Russian and again translated for the Russian gymnastic team when they came to America."

"At the same time, we were working our tails off to smuggle Bibles into the Soviet Union and had several trips that went there smuggling Bibles in," he continued.

Green was completely flabbergasted by the revelations, as Barton recounted "all that smuggling time and how dangerous it was, you know, the Soviet bloc and the guards at the borders and all the stuff that went on there. It was pretty amazing":

John Hagee Winds Up Debunking His Own 'Blood Moons' Theory

On Saturday evening, right-wing televangelist John Hagee hosted a special program designed to promote his "Four Blood Moons" theory which contends that the occurrence of four lunar eclipses on Jewish feast days over the last two years is a sign from God that "something dramatic [will] happen in the Middle East involving Israel that will change the course of history in the Middle East and impact the whole world."

Moderated by conservative radio host Joe Pagliarulo, the program featured Hagee, pseudo-historian David Barton, Rabbi Aryeh Scheinberg, and astronomer Hugh Ross, a creationist who runs a ministry called Reasons to Believe which seeks to "spread the Christian Gospel by demonstrating that sound reason and scientific research" support Creationist beliefs.

Ross' participation in the event was something of a mystery since, from his opening remarks, he made it very clear that he did not subscribe to Hagee's premise in the slightest, saying that there is no statistical significance to these blood moons because they are very common and that Hagee is merely retroactively attaching spiritual significance to these routine events.

Hagee, of course, did not particularly appreciate the fact that Ross was completely undermining the entire premise of the show, as well as his book and movie based upon this premise, and so he challenged him to explain how it was possible for blood moons to occur on significant Jewish holiday in two consecutive years.

Ross responded that lunar eclipses are so common that it is "mathematically inevitable" that one would be able to link them up to significant events in the Bible or in the history of Israel if that is what one set out to do. The Bible, Ross said, does say that there will be signs from God, but they will be rare things like an asteroid hitting a body of water and turning the water to poison, not common things like a lunar eclipse.

"My problem with the blood moons is that it's not rare," Ross said. "It's hindsight. You're looking at different events in Israel's history and looking at different events in America's history and you're finding fits."

"These blood moons are visible here but not in Israel," Ross stated at one point, much to Hagee's surprise. Explaining that "a total lunar eclipse basically is visible to about one-third to one-half the earth," Ross asked why, if these blood moons are so significant to Israel, they are visible in America but not in Israel.

Hagee clearly was not aware of this fact, as all he could come up with as a response was that "I don't have an answer for why Israel can't see it":

Pastors Network's Sam Rohrer: Gov't Officials' Job Is To 'Promote God’s Moral Law'

The American Pastors Network organized a Pennsylvania pastor summit last week featuring right-wing activists David Barton and Sandy Rios, along with video greetings from Mike Huckabee overlooking the valley of Armageddon. Sam Rohrer, president of both the Pennsylvania and American Pastors Networks, is a graduate of Bob Jones University and a former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, where he authored legislation to direct millions of tax dollars into Christian schools. At last year’s March for Marriage, Rohrer warned that marriage equality will doom America to tyranny and “invite God’s judgment.”

Following “God’s promptings,” Rohrer ran for governor in 2010 and for the U.S. Senate in 2012. He did not win either of those races, but says “God used the statewide travels to deepen his relationship with many pastors across the state.”

Rohrer wants to build networks of conservative pastors in all 50 states. His “Stand in the Gap” radio shows have a growing Pennsylvania-based radio presence. Rohrer’s philosophy about church-state relations and his vision for the state networks he has set out to build are summarized in a pamphlet distributed at the conference:

The Biblical Relationship: Pastors and Government Leaders

The phrase “Ministers of God” is often used to describe pastors in the pulpits. Yet God also uses the title of “Ministers of God” to describe those in positions of civil government as referred to in Romans 13. This is a title God gives to those He raises up and both of these positions of authority are equally established by God to accomplish His purposes.

Pastors are charged with wielding the Word of God as an instrument of Truth, preaching the whole counsel of God into all of His institutions – the Home, Civil Government, and the Church to equip people to advance God’s design for society (II Tim. 4:2)

Government leaders are charged with wielding the Word of God as an instrument of Justice, promoting God’s moral law as the foundation of right and wrong, encouraging those who do well biblically, and executing judgment on those who break the law (Romans 13:3,4)

Rohrer writes that the relationship between pastors and government leaders is “biblical, not political.”  The APN’s Ministers Together Initiative “seeks to restore the biblical relationship and commitment between the Pastor and the Government Leader to help each other, pray for each other, encourage each other and together commit to acting in obedience to the commands of scripture.”

 

Pastors Network: America Going Down the Tubes, Needs Pastors To Call Down Fire

The American Pastors Network, a Religious Right group hoping to organize networks of politically active evangelical pastors in all 50 states, met with Pennsylvania pastors at Lancaster Bible College on Thursday. The day-long event featured several national speakers like “historian” David Barton, activist Paul Blair of Reclaiming America for Christ, and right-wing broadcaster Sandy Rios, who as Kyle reported yesterday, urged participants to prepare for martyrdom

The threat of anti-Christian persecution was a frequent theme at the U-Turn conference, which took its name and themes from a recent book co-authored by Barton and evangelical pollster George Barna. For example, Steve Scheibner, an American Airlines pilot who narrowly avoided being on a flight that was hijacked and flown into the World Trade Center, declared, “Persecution is coming.” But, he added, “It may be the best thing that’s ever happened to the church.” Another speaker, Dale Anderson, thanked “that rascal” Barack Obama for having woken up the church.

Paul Blair gave David Barton-esque remarks about the nation’s history and cited English jurist William Blackstone in arguing that there can be no valid law that is contrary to scripture. He declared that “Judge Roy Moore,” Alabama’s Supreme Court Chief Justice, is “a hero” for defying a federal judge’s decision on marriage equality. Blair said America is in its current state because too many pastors and people have been “sheep.” He insisted that marriage equality is a line that Christians must not allow to be crossed.

Barna was the Debbie Downer of the conference, reeling off pages of statistics designed to show the moral decline of America and the diminishing influence of the church in American culture.  Among the statistics that seemed to land like a punch to the gut: only nine percent of born-again Americans have what Barna calls a “biblical worldview” – just over 51 percent of Protestant senior pastors make the grade. Barna decried the fact that so many pastors do not preach about current political topics.

Barton’s speech contained no surprises for anyone familiar with his shtick about the influence of colonial-era pastors on the country’s founding, the number of Bible verses supposedly contained in the U.S. Constitution, and his insistence that the Bible is filled with specific policy prescriptions, such as opposition to minimum wages and capital gains taxes. In fact, he said, the Bible includes 613 civil laws for running the country.

Barton cited principles of warfare taught at the Army War College to argue that the church is supposed to be on offense, not defense, in current culture war battles. Making that happen is the goal of those who are working to build the American Pastors Network, including Sam Rohrer, a former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and a 2010 gubernatorial candidate, who serves as president of both the national and Pennsylvania networks.

Among the video presentations at the conference was a message recorded by Mike Huckabee in Israel, standing on a ridge overlooking the valley that he said would be the site of the battle of Armageddon. He stood on Mt. Carmel, the site of an Old Testament showdown in which Elijah showed up the prophets of Baal by having God rain down fire on an altar he had drenched with water. America, said Huckabee, needs pulpits willing to call down God’s fire.

Among the vendors doing a brisk business at the conference was the Institute of the Constitution, which promotes a Christian Reconstructionist ideology, and which has used its materials to train Tea Party activists in their vision of a radically, and biblically, limited role for the government.

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/17/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/16/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/6/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/3/15

  • PFAW: Cruz, Jindal Headline Event with Extremist David Lane.
  • Tina Nguyen @ Mediaite: Reporters Not Allowed to Cover Jindal Speech Unless They Only Report Approved Quotes.
  • Paul Gordon @ Huffington Post: Americans Will Know Who to Blame If the Roberts Court Wrecks Our Healthcare System.
  • Andy Towle @ Towleroad: Charlotte, NC City Council Rejects LGBT Non-Discrimination Ordinance in 6-5 Vote.
  • David Edwards @ Raw Story: Benham brothers’ dad shouts at transgender women using bathrooms: ‘I’d drag that queen right out’.
  • Charles Johnson @ LGF: EXCLUSIVE: #CPAC2015 Gave Press Credentials to White Supremacist Radio Show "Political Cesspool".
  • Warren Throckmorton: David Barton Mixes Up Studies in Effort to Prove His Views on HIV.

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/2/15

David Barton: The Bible Says There Will Never Be A Vaccine For HIV Because AIDS Is The Penalty For Homosexuality

In the second in a series of presentations that he recently made at Charis Bible College in Colorado, right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton reiterated his belief that God will never allow a cure or vaccine for AIDS to be discovered because the disease is divine punishment for homosexuality.

Citing Romans 1, which declares that "men did shameful things with other men, and as a result of this sin, they suffered within themselves the penalty they deserved," Barton said that God will never allow a cure to be found for AIDS because that would eliminate the "penalty" that is due for engaging in such behavior.

"Anything the Bible says is right, there is scientific basis for it now," Barton said. "The federal government, in the last several years, has spent tens of billions of dollars looking for a vaccine for AIDS and I don't think they will ever find a vaccine for HIV/AIDS. And I say that based on a particular Bible verse ... Notice this, homosexuals receive in their bodies the penalty due them. The Bible says if you engage in homosexuality, your body will do things that will penalize you. So if you can have a vaccine for AIDS, then you're keeping your body from penalizing you. I don't think they'll ever find a vaccine for AIDS":

UPDATE: Warren Throckmorton took a look at the scientific evidence that Barton subsequently cited as "proof" of this point and discovered that Barton completely misrepresented the facts.

Right Wing Round-Up - 2/25/15

David Barton Claims To Have Played On Record-Setting Basketball Team In College

Earlier this month, David Barton delivered a series of presentations at Charis Bible College in Colorado on "The Principles of Success." In the very first presentation, Barton made a claim that we had never heard from him before, despite having listened to literally hundreds of his radio programs and presentations, when he told the audience that he played college basketball for a team that "set the NCAA record for two years in a row of most points scored" per game.

Barton was teaching on a passage from 1 Corinthians about the need to "strike a blow to my body and make it my slave" and whip one's self into shape in order to be a success and cited his college basketball days as an example.

"I remember when I was playing basketball, the college stuff that we did," he said, "we started every day with a five mile run, then we lifted weights, then we had an hour of racquetball, then we had two hours of full-court basketball, then we came back for another run. It wasn't particularly enjoyable, but in those years, our college team set the NCAA record for two years in a row of most points scored. We averaged 105, 104, 103 points a game, I forget what it was":

Just about every report that we have ever seen states that Barton graduated from Oral Roberts University and did so in 1976.

According to Wikipedia, the ORU men's basketball team led the nation in scoring in the 1972 and 1973 seasons. A search of the rosters posted on ORU's own website from the years Barton presumably attended finds no mention of him having been on the men's basketball team, including during the two record-setting seasons he specifically cited:

UPDATE: Warren Throckmorton contacted ORU directly to inquire about Barton's claim and a school official declared that "after checking with the Athletic Office, there is no record of a David Barton ever playing basketball for ORU."

Right Wing Round-Up 2/23/15

Barton: Even Stephen Breyer Knows Our System Of Due Process Came Directly Out Of The Bible

Recently, David Barton sat down for a conversation with Pastor Jack Hibbs of Calvary Chapel in Chino Hills, California, during which he asserted that even Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer knows that the due process clauses in the Bill of Rights came directly out of the Bible and even mentioned this fact in one of his Supreme Court decisions.

"I was reading a Supreme Court case," Barton said, "and in it, Justice Breyer — and no one is going to accuse Justice Breyer of being a religious individual, he'll not be found guilty of that — and he makes the comment that 'of course we all know that all of our due processes clauses in our Bill of Rights came out of the Bible.'"

Barton said that Breyer even footnoted this assertion in his ruling, citing Volume 30 of "Federal Practice and Procedure," which Barton claims contains a sixty page explanation of how our system of due process came directly out of the Bible.

"There's Breyer saying 'of course we all know that the due process clauses came out of the Bible,'" Barton said. "We don't know that today":

As is typical when Barton makes these sorts of claims, he doesn't actually provide any information about the ruling in which Breyer supposedly made this assertion, making it all but impossible verify the claim that he has just made.

Our best guess is that Barton is referring to Breyer's 1999 concurrence in Lilly v. Virginia (emphasis added):

The Court’s effort to tie the Clause so directly to the hearsay rule is of fairly recent vintage, compare Roberts, supra, with California v. Green, 399 U.S. 149, 155—156 (1970), while the Confrontation Clause itself has ancient origins that predate the hearsay rule, see Salinger v. United States, 272 U.S. 542, 548 (1926) (“The right of confrontation did not originate with the provision in the Sixth Amendment, but was a common-law right having recognized exceptions”). The right of an accused to meet his accusers face-to-face is mentioned in, among other things, the Bible, Shakespeare, and 16th and 17th century British statutes, cases, and treatises. See The Bible, Acts 25:16; W. Shakespeare, Richard II, act i, sc. 1; W. Shakespeare, Henry VIII, act ii, sc. 1; 30 C. Wright & K. Graham, Federal Practice and Procedure §6342, p. 227 (1997) (quoting statutes enacted under King Edward VI in 1552 and Queen Elizabeth I in 1558); cf. Case of Thomas Tong, Kelyng J. 17, 18, 84 Eng. Rep. 1061, 1062 (1662) (out-of-court confession may be used against the confessor, but not against his co-conspirators); M. Hale, History of the Common Law of England 163—164 (C. Gray ed. 1971); 3 W. Blackstone, Commentaries *373. As traditionally understood, the right was designed to prevent, for example, the kind of abuse that permitted the Crown to convict Sir Walter Raleigh of treason on the basis of the out-of-court confession of Lord Cobham, a co-conspirator. See 30 Wright & Graham, supra, §6342, at 258—269.

You'll note that, contrary to Barton's claim, Breyer is not saying that "all of our due processes clauses in our Bill of Rights came out of the Bible," but merely that the right to face one's accuser is mentioned in the Bible, among other places. On top of that, the Bible verse that Breyer cites, Acts 25:16, consists of the Apostle Paul citing his right to confront his accuser according to Roman law:

I told them that it is not the Roman custom to hand over anyone before they have faced their accusers and have had an opportunity to defend themselves against the charges.

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