David Barton

Barton: LGBT Activists Are 'Evangelizing' Public School Students To Recruit Them Into Homosexuality

On the "WallBuilders Live" radio program today, David Barton warned that LGBT rights activists are seeking to "evangelize" public school students in order to recruit them into homosexuality.

Reacting to reports that an elementary school in Maine had read "I Am Jazz," a book about a transgender child, to young students, Barton warned that this was part of an effort by LGBT activists to evangelize young kids into thinking that they are gay.

"This is evangelism," Barton said. "This is exactly how you evangelize. You raise questions. You give examples. You share stuff, you create relational stories. They're doing evangelism for transgenders."

Barton then went on to once again cite his favorite 19th century source to explain that this is exactly why homosexuality should be illegal.

"The simple answer goes back to a law book in 1814 is that folks like this, like homosexuals, they have to recruit kids," he said. "That's the only way they can keep their movement alive because adults don't go there. You have to recruit kids. And so that's why, back in 1814, they were explaining why we don't allow homosexuality, why our laws are against that, because you're evangelizing kids for that lifestyle."

Right Wing Round-Up - 5/11/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 5/8/15

Gohmert: Failure To Stop Iran Deal Will Be 'The Downfall Of Israel And The United States'

Rep. Louie Gohmert was the guest on today's "WallBuilders Live" radio broadcast, where he warned that if the Senate does not stop President Obama's deal with Iran, it will be the end for America.

If leaders in the Senate "continue to be wimps" and refuse to stop the Iran deal, he warned, then "that will be written up as the downfall of Israel and the United States."

"I think Israel is going to come through, by the grace of God," Gohmert said, "but if we are this stupid in helping our enemy come after us, then we would be, in the eyes of history, deserving of what we get":

Later, David Barton chimed in to declare that support for the nation of Israel is the most important issue of the 2016 election because nothing else will matter if God stops blessing America.

"If you believe in the Bible, if you think the Bible is true, then you have to take is seriously when God says, 'Whoever blesses Israel, I'll bless, whoever curses Israel, I'll curse,'" he said. "If God actually means what He says and, of course, He says He does, then that's got to be a number-one issue in the next election because I don't care how good you are on the economy, I don't care how good you are on education, I don't care how good you are on defense, if you're bad on Israel, we're not going to be a blessed nation":

Creationist Tax-Dodger Kent 'Dr. Dino' Hovind Is A Modern Day Job

Today's "WallBuilders Live" radio program was dedicated entirely to an interview that Rick Green and David Barton recently conducted with Kent Hovind, the right-wing folk hero known as "Dr. Dino" from his days running Dinosaur Adventure Land, a creationist theme park in Florida.

Hovind has spent most of the last decade in prison for "structuring" in an effort to avoid paying federal income tax on the grounds that all of the money generated by his theme park belonged to God. He is currently facing even more legal troubles stemming from his alleged efforts to illegally prevent the government from selling off properties seized from him in the original tax case.

Today's WallBuilders interview was entirely one-sided, as Green and Barton more or less allowed Hovind to tell his side of the story unchallenged as he repeatedly insisted that he had never broken any laws and had never done anything wrong and, at one point, even compared himself to Job.

After Green noted that Hovind has not received much support from the conservative Christian community because many believe Hovind to be nothing more than a tax protestor, Hovind insisted that he was nothing of the sort.

"People who say that about me," Hovind asserted, "are doing the same thing Job's friends did to him. Bildad, Eliphaz, and Zophar, they said 'Job, you had to do something wrong or this wouldn't have happened.' Their whole song and dance for the whole book of Job was 'Job, you had to sin.' Finally, God had to explain it to them in Chapter 42, guys, go tell Job you're sorry. And so maybe that will happen in my case":

Barton: New Book Written By Two Authors With 'Ph.Ds' Validates My Jefferson Book

Back in 2012, Religious Right pseudo-historian David Barton published his book "The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson," through which he sought to portray Jefferson as someone who would make today's Religious Right seem moderate by comparison.

Barton's thesis and his scholarship were so roundly criticized that ultimately his book was pulled from publication by the publisher. Despite the fact that he produced one of the least credible works of historical scholarship in recent memory, Barton continues to defend his book and even featured the authors of a new book on Jefferson on his radio program yesterday, claiming that their book supports and validates the claims that he made in his own book.

And Barton was very intent on letting his audience know that these authors both held a Ph.D, making sure to mention it three times in less than a minute:

That's why, we we came out with the book "The Jefferson Lies" that tore down all this stuff, man, the left went viciously through the roof and said "oh, that's not true." Well, now it turns out that other scholars, a couple of Ph.Ds have come out with a new book called "Doubting Thomas" that indeed reaches the same conclusions that we did on the faith of Jefferson ... And so now Ph.Ds are out with this kind of stuff and we thought this is good because people need the apologetics on Thomas Jefferson because if you can take Jefferson away from left then it becomes very naked what they're trying to do. They're trying to impose their own personal agenda. It no longer has anything to do history or credibility. And so this will be a fun interview to look at Jefferson through the eyes of two PH.Ds who have done research work on Jefferson that has not been done in this generations for sure and I don't think this kind of work has been done in Jefferson in the last one hundred years, quite frankly.

Not surprisingly, the authors of "Doubting Thomas: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson" whom were featured on Barton's program are both Religious Right activists.

Jerry Newcombe is a long time Religious Right activist and radio host with the conservative group Truth in Action Ministries who received a Doctorate of Ministry from Knox Theological Seminary in 2008.

Mark Belilesis a Seven Mountains dominionist who earned his Doctor of Philosophy from Whitefield Theological Seminary in 1999, an unaccredited institution which focuses on distance-learning.

Their theological degrees are utterly irrelevant, but Barton's insistence on repeatedly noting that the authors both held "Ph.Ds" seemed pretty clearly designed to create the false impression that they were historians by trade.

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/22/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/17/15

David Barton Assures Glenn Beck That The Government Can Outlaw Homosexuality

As we have noted before, Glenn Beck is fond of bragging that he doesn't even know anyone who could be considered to be "anti-gay" despite the fact that he works closely with a great many such people on a regular basis. The only way Beck can plausibly claim not to be aware of the anti-gay views espoused by even close personal friends like David Barton is if he is intentionally choosing not to listen to what they say, which actually seems to be the case.

Last night, Beck featured Barton on his television program for the entire hour and much of the discussion involved efforts to protect the "rights" of Christian business owners to discriminate against gay people in the name of protecting religious liberty. At one point, Barton made the argument that the government is overstepping it jurisdiction by requiring Christians to violate their consciences because that is a right granted to them by God, which he sought to illustrate by comparing it to someone repainting some else's car simply because they didn't like the original color.

Beck agreed, saying that, by the same token, "the government can't say 'you can't be a homosexual' because ... that's how you practice your life."

Not so fast, Barton responded.

"To some degree. But the government has always taken stands on behavior that undermine the government itself," Barton said. "And that's where morality has always ... see, consanguinity, the government's always gotten involved; you can't marry your brother and sister, you can't marry your first cousin. So there's always been things that protect the moral climate of the society ... You've always had standards on behavior":

Barton was very clearly pushing back on Beck's notion that the government has no right to outlaw homosexuality,  which, given Barton's anti-gay rhetoric and belief that our public policy must operate according to the Bible, would only come as a surprise to someone who has intentionally been trying to ignore Barton's well-documented views.

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/15/15

David Barton Once Again Claims That The Bible Says There Will Never Be An AIDS Vaccine

Last month, we posted a clip of David Barton asserting that God will never allow scientists to find a vaccine for HIV/AIDS because such a vaccine would eliminate the divine "penalty" for homosexuality, which would contradict the teaching found in Romans 1.

As "evidence" of this position, the Religious Right psuedo-historian and GOP activist claimed that the virus that causes AIDS is constantly mutating, making it impossible to inoculate against. He pointed to news stories about various failures by researchers to successfully test an experimental vaccine as "proof" of his assertion.

As Warren Throckmorton reported at the time, the stories that Barton cited were utterly unrelated and did not prove his point at all:

In the video, Barton first showed the Popular Science headline and then said:

The headlines came out and said, for the first time ever an HIV vaccine shows success in trial. Oh my gosh, I guess there is, I guess I must have misinterpreted the Bible, cause the Bible’s true, and then six weeks later, they came out with this that says, NIH halts trial of HIV vaccine after it fails to work. The newspaper said it worked but none of the medical evidence said that it worked. So they still don’t have a cure.

The problem with Barton’s presentation is that the second headline didn’t come out “six weeks later.” Rather it came out four years later in 2013 and was about an entirely different attempt to create a vaccine.

The Yahoo News article Barton referred to (the second headline) is only available via Internet Archives and is dated April 26, 2013. The Yahoo article linked to the NIH announcement that the HVTN 505 clinical trial had been halted. The HVTN 505 trial results had nothing to do with the earlier success of RV 144. The RV 144 trial was reported in 2009, the same year that the HVTN 505 started. The NIH has more on the HVTN 505 trial on the NIH website.

Barton got the time frame wrong and made it appear that the two headlines were related to each other.

Barton's claim was entirely false but he continues to repeat it nonetheless, as Throckmorton discovered when Barton spoke at Faith Baptist Church in Knightdale, North Carolina this weekend:

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/10/15

Barton: America Will Collapse Within 80 Years Without 'Premarital Purity And Postmarital Fidelity'

In an interview at a Cleveland Right to Life Event last year, self-proclaimed historian David Barton declared that “no nation” has ever survived more than 80 years past a collapse of “premarital purity and postmarital fidelity.”

“In regards to the moral standing of other democracies, including ancient Rome, how is the United States measuring up today?” an interviewer asked Barton in an edited clip posted on YouTube by the anti-choice group.

“Well, we got real trouble,” Barton responded.

“…Pre-marital purity and post-marital fidelity…no nation, any nation in 5,000 years has ever survived two generations past that, so it’s gone within 80 years,” he said. “So Rome’s the same way.”

The comments start about 20 seconds into the clip:

David Barton Recounts His Days Serving As Translator For Russian National Gymnastic Team And Smuggling Bibles Into Soviet Union

A few months ago, we posted a video of David Barton claiming that he had been part of Oral Roberts University's record-setting men's college basketball team back in the early 1970s, a claim for which we and others have been unable to find any proof.  At the same time, we have also been unable to definitively disprove it, so we really have no way of knowing whether or not any of it is true.

Today, Barton made another extraordinary claim on his "WallBuilders Live" radio program, which we once again can neither verify nor disprove, but that we find genuinely astonishing.  Barton told listeners that he was fluent in Russian when he was younger and even served as an interpreter when the Russian national gymnastics team visited the United States in 1976. On top of that, Barton also claimed that he was actively involved in smuggling Bibles into the former Soviet Union.

Following an interview with a missionary who discussed efforts to introduce the Bible to eastern European countries, Barton chimed in that he too used to be involved in smuggling Bibles into the former Soviet Union.

"That's really where I got started with the Soviet bloc back when the Iron Curtain was up," Barton said. "I was fluent in Russian and when the Russian gymnastic team came to America in 1976, I got to be translator for them and do translating, and just the accounts of what happened when we went to the store was a blast."

This revelation obviously came as an utter surprise to Barton's co-host, Rick Green, who was shocked to discover that Barton speaks Russian ... or rather did speak Russian, as Barton said that "I don't now but I was, at one time, fluent in Russian and again translated for the Russian gymnastic team when they came to America."

"At the same time, we were working our tails off to smuggle Bibles into the Soviet Union and had several trips that went there smuggling Bibles in," he continued.

Green was completely flabbergasted by the revelations, as Barton recounted "all that smuggling time and how dangerous it was, you know, the Soviet bloc and the guards at the borders and all the stuff that went on there. It was pretty amazing":

John Hagee Winds Up Debunking His Own 'Blood Moons' Theory

On Saturday evening, right-wing televangelist John Hagee hosted a special program designed to promote his "Four Blood Moons" theory which contends that the occurrence of four lunar eclipses on Jewish feast days over the last two years is a sign from God that "something dramatic [will] happen in the Middle East involving Israel that will change the course of history in the Middle East and impact the whole world."

Moderated by conservative radio host Joe Pagliarulo, the program featured Hagee, pseudo-historian David Barton, Rabbi Aryeh Scheinberg, and astronomer Hugh Ross, a creationist who runs a ministry called Reasons to Believe which seeks to "spread the Christian Gospel by demonstrating that sound reason and scientific research" support Creationist beliefs.

Ross' participation in the event was something of a mystery since, from his opening remarks, he made it very clear that he did not subscribe to Hagee's premise in the slightest, saying that there is no statistical significance to these blood moons because they are very common and that Hagee is merely retroactively attaching spiritual significance to these routine events.

Hagee, of course, did not particularly appreciate the fact that Ross was completely undermining the entire premise of the show, as well as his book and movie based upon this premise, and so he challenged him to explain how it was possible for blood moons to occur on significant Jewish holiday in two consecutive years.

Ross responded that lunar eclipses are so common that it is "mathematically inevitable" that one would be able to link them up to significant events in the Bible or in the history of Israel if that is what one set out to do. The Bible, Ross said, does say that there will be signs from God, but they will be rare things like an asteroid hitting a body of water and turning the water to poison, not common things like a lunar eclipse.

"My problem with the blood moons is that it's not rare," Ross said. "It's hindsight. You're looking at different events in Israel's history and looking at different events in America's history and you're finding fits."

"These blood moons are visible here but not in Israel," Ross stated at one point, much to Hagee's surprise. Explaining that "a total lunar eclipse basically is visible to about one-third to one-half the earth," Ross asked why, if these blood moons are so significant to Israel, they are visible in America but not in Israel.

Hagee clearly was not aware of this fact, as all he could come up with as a response was that "I don't have an answer for why Israel can't see it":

Pastors Network's Sam Rohrer: Gov't Officials' Job Is To 'Promote God’s Moral Law'

The American Pastors Network organized a Pennsylvania pastor summit last week featuring right-wing activists David Barton and Sandy Rios, along with video greetings from Mike Huckabee overlooking the valley of Armageddon. Sam Rohrer, president of both the Pennsylvania and American Pastors Networks, is a graduate of Bob Jones University and a former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, where he authored legislation to direct millions of tax dollars into Christian schools. At last year’s March for Marriage, Rohrer warned that marriage equality will doom America to tyranny and “invite God’s judgment.”

Following “God’s promptings,” Rohrer ran for governor in 2010 and for the U.S. Senate in 2012. He did not win either of those races, but says “God used the statewide travels to deepen his relationship with many pastors across the state.”

Rohrer wants to build networks of conservative pastors in all 50 states. His “Stand in the Gap” radio shows have a growing Pennsylvania-based radio presence. Rohrer’s philosophy about church-state relations and his vision for the state networks he has set out to build are summarized in a pamphlet distributed at the conference:

The Biblical Relationship: Pastors and Government Leaders

The phrase “Ministers of God” is often used to describe pastors in the pulpits. Yet God also uses the title of “Ministers of God” to describe those in positions of civil government as referred to in Romans 13. This is a title God gives to those He raises up and both of these positions of authority are equally established by God to accomplish His purposes.

Pastors are charged with wielding the Word of God as an instrument of Truth, preaching the whole counsel of God into all of His institutions – the Home, Civil Government, and the Church to equip people to advance God’s design for society (II Tim. 4:2)

Government leaders are charged with wielding the Word of God as an instrument of Justice, promoting God’s moral law as the foundation of right and wrong, encouraging those who do well biblically, and executing judgment on those who break the law (Romans 13:3,4)

Rohrer writes that the relationship between pastors and government leaders is “biblical, not political.”  The APN’s Ministers Together Initiative “seeks to restore the biblical relationship and commitment between the Pastor and the Government Leader to help each other, pray for each other, encourage each other and together commit to acting in obedience to the commands of scripture.”

 

Pastors Network: America Going Down the Tubes, Needs Pastors To Call Down Fire

The American Pastors Network, a Religious Right group hoping to organize networks of politically active evangelical pastors in all 50 states, met with Pennsylvania pastors at Lancaster Bible College on Thursday. The day-long event featured several national speakers like “historian” David Barton, activist Paul Blair of Reclaiming America for Christ, and right-wing broadcaster Sandy Rios, who as Kyle reported yesterday, urged participants to prepare for martyrdom

The threat of anti-Christian persecution was a frequent theme at the U-Turn conference, which took its name and themes from a recent book co-authored by Barton and evangelical pollster George Barna. For example, Steve Scheibner, an American Airlines pilot who narrowly avoided being on a flight that was hijacked and flown into the World Trade Center, declared, “Persecution is coming.” But, he added, “It may be the best thing that’s ever happened to the church.” Another speaker, Dale Anderson, thanked “that rascal” Barack Obama for having woken up the church.

Paul Blair gave David Barton-esque remarks about the nation’s history and cited English jurist William Blackstone in arguing that there can be no valid law that is contrary to scripture. He declared that “Judge Roy Moore,” Alabama’s Supreme Court Chief Justice, is “a hero” for defying a federal judge’s decision on marriage equality. Blair said America is in its current state because too many pastors and people have been “sheep.” He insisted that marriage equality is a line that Christians must not allow to be crossed.

Barna was the Debbie Downer of the conference, reeling off pages of statistics designed to show the moral decline of America and the diminishing influence of the church in American culture.  Among the statistics that seemed to land like a punch to the gut: only nine percent of born-again Americans have what Barna calls a “biblical worldview” – just over 51 percent of Protestant senior pastors make the grade. Barna decried the fact that so many pastors do not preach about current political topics.

Barton’s speech contained no surprises for anyone familiar with his shtick about the influence of colonial-era pastors on the country’s founding, the number of Bible verses supposedly contained in the U.S. Constitution, and his insistence that the Bible is filled with specific policy prescriptions, such as opposition to minimum wages and capital gains taxes. In fact, he said, the Bible includes 613 civil laws for running the country.

Barton cited principles of warfare taught at the Army War College to argue that the church is supposed to be on offense, not defense, in current culture war battles. Making that happen is the goal of those who are working to build the American Pastors Network, including Sam Rohrer, a former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and a 2010 gubernatorial candidate, who serves as president of both the national and Pennsylvania networks.

Among the video presentations at the conference was a message recorded by Mike Huckabee in Israel, standing on a ridge overlooking the valley that he said would be the site of the battle of Armageddon. He stood on Mt. Carmel, the site of an Old Testament showdown in which Elijah showed up the prophets of Baal by having God rain down fire on an altar he had drenched with water. America, said Huckabee, needs pulpits willing to call down God’s fire.

Among the vendors doing a brisk business at the conference was the Institute of the Constitution, which promotes a Christian Reconstructionist ideology, and which has used its materials to train Tea Party activists in their vision of a radically, and biblically, limited role for the government.

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/17/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/16/15

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/6/15

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