David Barton

Glenn Beck Can Barely Contain Himself At The Idea Of 'Senator David Barton'

A few weeks ago, Glenn Beck set out on a mission to convince Rep. Louie Gohmert to launch a primary challenge to Sen. John Cornyn; an endeavor that Gohmert was clearly reluctant to undertake.

But now Beck has moved on, predicting that Gohmert will remain in the House where he will run for Speaker, which leaves open the position of primary challenger to Cornyn.  So who does Beck want to see fill that slot?  None other than his best friend David Barton.

"Senator David Barton," Beck just kept repeating on his radio program today, unable to keep the elated smile off of his face just thinking about it:

Barton: It's Not Global Warming, It's The Judgment Of God

David Barton recently sat down with televangelist Kenneth Copeland for another series of "Believer's Voice of Victory" programs that are apparently supposed to air sometime next week, as lots of the discussion is focused on mobilizing people to vote in the upcoming off-year elections in states like Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere.

Several of the programs have already been uploaded to YouTube, include one in which Copeland and Barton declare that voting for candidates who support abortion opens the door to a curse upon the nation that results in floods, tornadoes, and pedophilia.

"Abortion was a seed to it," said Copeland, "that has grown into a murderous, bloody crop of child death."

Once "you open the door to killing," Barton added, "it's got a lot of different manifestations" because the nation immediately falls under the judgment of God as He removes his protection and "whap, here comes storms like we've never seen before and here comes floods and here comes climate stuff that we can't explain; all of the hot times and all the cold times and not enough rain and too much rain and we're flooding over here and we've got droughts over here ... And today we're saying 'oh no, it's global warming." No, we opened a door that lost God's protection over our environment and that's our choice":

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/30/13

  • Miranda @ PFAW Blog: By the Numbers: Why The Republican Argument For Filibustering DC Circuit Nominees Is Bogus.
  • TFN Insider: Ted Cruz Wants to Teach about the History of Conservatism.

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/29/13

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/22/13

Right Wing Leftovers - 10/21/13

  • David Barton will receive Ohio Christian University's very first Faith & Liberty Award for being such an awesome historian.
  • When Ted Cruz spoke at a Texas Federation of Republican Women gathering over the weekend, he received an eight minute standing ovation.
  • On a related note, Mike Huckabee says that people like Cruz are hurting the Republican Party.
  • Speaking utterly without irony, Glenn Beck called Oprah Winfrey “the biggest fraud ever perpetrated on the American people."
  • James Robison has had enough: "I am declaring America is being encouraged to believe and embrace lies…to support them, to cast aside our founders’ principles—including God’s Word and eternal truths—and submit to the bondage of an out-of-control state. The federal government and deceived representatives are forcing legislation, policies, and practices on American citizens, demanding that our tax dollars—our money, which God has trusted to our watchcare—be used to support worthless, godless, freedom-damaging policies, programs, and laws."
  • Finally, some Tea Party activists are declaring that Rick Scarborough does not, in any way, represent the Tea Party.

Barton: Second Amendment Guarantees An Individual Right To Own A Tank Or Fighter Jet

Today on "WallBuilders Live," David Barton doubled down on his assertion that there are literally no limits on the Second Amendment, declaring that individuals not only have an inalienable right to possess guns, but also tanks, rocket launchers, fighter jets, and anything else they can get their hands on; including, presumably, even nuclear bombs:

The belief of the Second Amendment was you as a citizen have a right to defend yourself whether it be against a thug, an aggressor, a crook, or against your government.

Now this is where a lot of liberals go through the roof; are you saying that you think individual citizens have a right to own a machine gun?

Yeah.  And an Abrams Tank, and a bazooka, and a F-16 because you've got a right to defend yourself with the same size of weapons that might be brought against you ... You have a right to fight back with whatever you can get your hands on to defend your life, your property, your possession, your family, your whatever.

Glenn Beck Supports Right-Wing Vote-Rigging Scheme

As a general rule, the candidate who receives the most votes in an election is declared the winner.  But that would all change if the Family Research Council's Ken Blackwell gets his way and states start adopting a vote-rigging scheme that he is recommending whereby, in a presidential election, electoral votes would switch from winner-take-all allocations to a system where they were awarded according to congressional districts.

As a result of such a switch, candidates who lose the overall popular vote in a state could still end up receiving a majority of that state's electoral votes simply by virtue of winning the popular vote in more individual districts.

As Blackwell admitted several months ago, if this sort of system had been in place during the last election, Mitt Romney would have won the presidency despite the fact that he lost the overall popular vote by nearly 5 million votes.

David Barton has eagerly been supporting the scheme by laughably claiming that it would "give the people a greater voice" and last night he got Glenn Beck to endorse it as well on his television program:

Barton Cites Decade-Old Survey As Proof Abortion Will Be Illegal In Twenty Years

One of the great things about David Barton is that once he has adopted a talking point, he continues to repeat it regardless of how absurd or out of date it has become.

For example, earlier this week Barton appeared on "Praise the Lord" where he told hosts Matt and Laurie Crouch that legal abortion will not be an issue in twenty years because God has sent a new generation of teenagers who are overwhelmingly pro-life.

Claiming that polls show that 72% of teens oppose abortion, Barton said they were "an answer that God has sent with a new generation; we just gotta train these guys right and turn them loose to get this thing fixed":

If you actually bother to find the poll Barton cites, you discover that it is from 2003 and it found that 72% of teens thought that abortion was morally wrong.

If you trust Barton, then abortion should be illegal within the next decade, since the poll he is using it over ten years old.  The only problem is that the teens in that survey are now adults and according to a Gallup poll conducted in May of this year, 50% of adults ages 18-29 consider themselves to be pro-choice while 41% consider themselves to be pro-life.

Of course, as with so many of Barton's other talking points, he doesn't bother to mention any of that because doing so would completely undermine the very claim that he is making.

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/9/13

David Barton Explains Why Academics And Historians Attack His Work

Despite the fact that the Religious Right still loves him, there can be no doubt that David Barton's reputation has suffered in recent years due, in large part, to the efforts of many Christian historians and professors who have worked diligently to debunk his pseudo-history.

Barton, of course, doesn't see it that way, as he explained to a conference last year when he declared that the real reason all these professors were attacking him is because they are hostile to any teaching about God.

Asserting that the true purpose of history is to chronicle the way in which God has carried out his plans through humanity, Barton said that professors at Christian universities had been trained in secularism by their professors and were now intent on indoctrinating their own Christian students with that same agenda. 

As such, when he wrote a book challenging that agenda, academic historians attacked him because "by and large, that profession as a whole is now the most hostile to God things of any profession in the nation":

What's been interesting is that in the last twenty to thirty years, you've also had lots of Christians join in and say 'hey, you can't teach this kind of stuff.' Now why in the world would Christians join with all these other groups to say you shouldn't be teaching providential history? Why would Christians join in to say you gotta keep history secular?

And the answer is probably found a great passage that Jesus gave us in Luke 6:40 where he says 'every student, when he is fully trained, will be like his teacher.' What happens is you've got a whole lot of [professors] at Christian schools that were trained by really secular guys and every student when he's fully trained will be like his teacher.

And so what happens is all these guys go through and get their PhDs but they've been trained by really secular-minded, higher criticism type guys and when they get there, they just communicate on to these Christian kids, or whatever kind of kids they've got, whatever they've been taught.

...

That's why today if you do something like try to put God in history, you're going to get nailed.  A book that we did, "The Jefferson Lies," made all sorts of national news because all these professors came out [and said] Jefferson didn't believe in God, he wasn't religious, he was a great atheist. I mean, they just went bonkers when we went back through and showed all the things Jefferson did ... but man if you try to get God back into the position that we ha him in history for three hundred years, it just drives these PhDs nuts.

Now there are some good PhDs, there are some good professors out there, great guys, but by and large that profession as a whole is now the most hostile to God things as any profession in the nation.

Does David Barton's 'Sober-Minded Scholarship' Include Attacks On Gays, Native Americans And Science?

While David Barton’s egregiously bad and outright dishonest scholarship makes him a laughable figure among historians, as Politico’s Stephanie Simon points out, his work continues to be popular among conservative activists and GOP politicians. Barton, himself a leader of the Texas Republican Party, pushes an avowedly partisan take on history while at the same time claiming that any criticism of his work is politically-motivated.

Although Barton’s biggest critics include scholars from conservative and evangelical institutions, Republican leaders don’t seem to mind Barton’s routinely debunked claims about the nation’s founding era. In fact, the widely discredited claim at the core of Barton’s historical analysis -- that the Founding Fathers were all evangelical Christians who would’ve even been farther to the right than the average Tea Party member -- is exactly what makes him an esteemed figure on the right.

Simon mentions that Barton will undoubtedly have a significant role in the upcoming Republican presidential primary and has earned the praise of potential candidates including Ted Cruz, commentators such as Glenn Beck and key GOP figures in Iowa.

But what Barton lacks in credentials as a real historian he makes up for with absolute confidence in his work, so much so that Simon writes that analysts believe he “brings an air of sober-minded scholarship to the culture wars.”

Examples of Barton’s “sober-minded scholarship” include his beliefs that:

And the list goes on.

While Ted Cruz said that he is “not in a position to opine on academic disputes between historians,” he would do well to remember that this is irrelevant when it comes to David Barton, who is not a historian at all.

Among The Religious Right, David Barton's Reputation Remains Untarnished

Over the weekend, Politico ran a profile of David Barton which pointed out that he remains extremely popular with the Religious Right and members of Congress, despite the fact that he is the author of the "least credible history book in print" and his "scholarship" is laughable.

The piece noted that even his supporters have been forced to secretly edit videos and programs posted on their websites in order to remove some of Barton's more egregious falsehoods, yet they continue to stand by him, as Barton brags that the mounting evidence of his fundamentally inaccurate history has not damaged his reputation one iota:

During their campaign to point out the errors in Barton’s work, his Christian critics asked two of the nation’s biggest evangelical advocacy groups, the Family Research Council and Focus on the Family, to stop promoting his faulty scholarship.

The FRC responded by quietly pulling from its website a popular video showcasing clips of Barton leading one of his Capitol tours. FRC Vice President Kenyn Cureton said the video was removed because of “a few historical inaccuracies.”

But the group continues to promote Barton elsewhere on its website as a “good friend” and “close ally.”

Focus on the Family, meanwhile, edited two videos on its website featuring a lengthy interview Barton gave to Focus radio. The editing deleted a segment in which Barton declares that Congress printed the first English-language Bible in America — and intended it to be used in schools. That’s one of Barton’s signature stories — it’s a highlight in his Capitol tour — but historians who have reviewed the documentation say it’s simply not true. Focus also cut an inaccurate anecdote about a contemporary legal case, which Barton cited to make the point that society today punishes people of faith.

Asked why the videos were edited, Carrie Gordon Earll, a senior director of public policy at Focus on the Family, at first said they had not been, though before-and-after footage can be publicly viewed on websites archiving Focus broadcasts. Earll then said she could not comment beyond a statement noting that Focus “has enjoyed a long and fruitful relationship with David Barton” and respects his “broad base of knowledge” about early American history.

In an interview with POLITICO, Barton said his remarks were sometimes taken out of context but defended his scholarship as impeccable.

And he said the controversy last summer did no damage to his standing, “not at all.”

If anyone knows anything about taking things out of context, it would be Barton, since that is a central feature of his "scholarship."

Barton: Everything The Bible Says Will Eventually Be Confirmed By Science

Today on "WallBuilders Live," David Barton returned to one of his favorite themes: that all true science and knowledge must correspond to the Bible.

As Barton has said before, all science that contradicts the Bible is false science. As such, it will eventually be realized that things like salt are good for you because that is what the Bible says; in fact, you can basically just take all of your healthcare recommendations straight from Bible.

Today, Barton added that everything the Bible says on every issue will eventually be confirmed by science: 

Barton: If God tells you to do it, I guarantee you at some point they will find scientific evidence on why that it is the right thing to do. It may be against the culture, it may not make any sense, who knows what, it doesn't matter.

And we have learned, after years of doing this and seeing literally thousands of stories like this that, you know what, if it's in the Bible, science is eventually going to show that that's the right stuff and the right thing to do.

If God says it and it's in the Scriptures, I don't care if its homosexuality or marriage, I don't care whether it's economics or debt, I don't care whether it's education and studies; if God says to do it, it's going to be the right thing to do and it will help me and benefit me.

Rick Green: And eventually it will be proven out.  Whether it's six months or six hundred years, at some point it's going to get proven out.

Obviously, it is now only a matter of time before modern science conclusively proves that adulterers, homosexuals, heathens, blasphemers, and rebellious children must be put to death, just like the Bible says.

Right Wing Leftovers - 9/5/13

  • The American Family Association is ending its three-year long boycott against Home Depot, claiming that the company has stopped making contributions to pro-gay causes.  We look forward to Home Depot responding by pointing out that the AFA is lying.
  • Focus on the Family's Kim Trobee says gay activists are eager to "force an entire nation into submission."
  • David Barton has endorsed Georgia State Senator Barry Loudermilk, which makes sense given that Loudermilk mindlessly repeats Barton's nonsense.
  • Rush Limbaugh literally has a new book coming out entitled "Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims."
  • James Dobson and Liberty University are "working together to build a curriculum based on Dr. Dobson’s writings and body of work."
  • FRC prays that "may the weakening of our armies by homosexual abuse and the decision to put women in bloody combat be reversed by courageous leaders in Congress and the Pentagon's weakening our Armies be reversed."
  • Finally, Bryan Fischer declares that "we are never, ever going to say same-sex marriage is okay":

Barton: Being A Good Scientist Or Mathematician Requires A Proper 'Fear Of The Lord'

Last week, we posted a clip of Bryan Fischer explaining that liberals can never be wise because they do not have the "fear of the Lord" that is required for true wisdom.

It comes as no surprise that a similar view is shared by David Barton, who claims that our entire educational system was based on the assertion from Proverbs that "the fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge." As such, Barton said, if someone wants to be a good scientist or mathematician, they must first have the proper "fear of the Lord."

But in recent decades, Barton lamented, education has become increasingly secular and the Bible is not required to be read in public schools any more, which is why people are far less educated today than they were in the past.

"When we had a God-fearing approach to education," Barton asserted, "our educational knowledge was so much higher than what it is now.  Just something as simple as having prayer in school and having a daily Bible reading.  Did you know, back when we did that in schools, America was number one in the world in literacy? We had the highest literacy rate in the world.  The last forty years we said 'ah, we don't want any religion in schools.'  We're now 68th in the world in literacy. Our knowledge of even how to read has fallen through the floor; correlates exactly to the time we said 'oh, fear of the Lord can't be part of our knowledge":

Barton: Atheism Is A Religion And Violation of Separation Of Church And State

Rep. John Fleming was the guest on "WallBuilders Live" today, discussing his effort to prevent the military from creating positions for atheist chaplains. After Fleming alleged that the proposal itself was nothing more than an effort to drive religion out of the military, David Barton blamed the entire thing on the Supreme Court, delivering a convoluted argument alleging that atheism is itself a religion and therefore should be banned from public school in the name of separation of church and state:

The Supreme Court opened the door to all of this. Back in decisions like U.S. vs Seeger and others, the court, in their dislike for traditional religion, they defined religion as whatever someone believes so sincerely and so strongly that it affects the way they act.

Now, if that's the case, by the court's definition, atheism and humanism would be religious because they affect the way people act.  But if that's the case, then why don't we have the separation of church and state with them, if they're a religion?

Darwinism and evolution is a religion. Why don't we say 'hey, we can't teach Darwinism in school. That affects the way people behave.  I demand separation of church and state. Get Darwinism out of the classroom.'

Or why don't we say 'hey, I don't see any prayers going at graduation; that's atheism!  I demand separation of church and state. Atheism has chaplains, they're a religion. Get atheism out of the schools.'

Hmmm, so not having prayer in school is now a violation of the separation of church and state? So what is the solution?  To require prayer?  Because that's somehow not a violation? 

Filling In For Glenn Beck, David Barton Lies About Common Core

As we noted several months ago, Glenn Beck has transformed his The Blaze network into a public policy organization dedicated to fighting the implementation of Common Core because he is convinced that it is going to lead to a 1984-like learning environment where students are strapped to computers and monitored at all times.

Leading this effort has been none other than David Barton, who, after hosting another gathering of anti-Common Core actvists and state legislators at Beck's headquarters, sat in for Beck on his television program on Friday for a hour-long program dedicated to Common Core and who, during his opening monologue, played this misleadingly edited video of an educator supposedly saying that, under Common Core, it doesn't matter if students think that 3 x 4 = 11 so long as they can explain how they arrived at that answer (skip ahead to 7:30 mark):

Following the clip, Barton said it showed that education under Common Core is not about "getting right answers," which is fundamentally false, and Barton knows it.

As we pointed out earlier this month, this video has been misleadingly edited, since the speaker is cut off after supposedly saying that getting the wrong answer is not important when the full video shows that she then goes on to say that any student who answered that 3 x 4 = 11 would be wrong and would be corrected.

In fact, Beck's own The Blaze network debunked the very clip that Barton played on the program last Monday:

The truncated clip features August’s statement: “But even under the new Common Core if even if they said 3 x 4 was 11, if they were able to explain their reasoning and explain how they came up with their answer, really in words and oral explanations and they showed it in a picture but they just got the final number wrong? We’re more focusing on the how and the why.”

An audience member then asks whether students will be corrected for giving the wrong answer.

“Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. We want our students to compute correctly. But the emphasis is really moving more towards the explanation, and the how, and the why, and can I really talk through the procedures that I went through to get this answer — and not just knowing that it’s 12, but why is it 12? How do I know that?” August replies.

A fuller video of the forum, however, reveals that August said first students should certainly know that 3 x 4 equals 12.

This is now the third time that we have found something debunked by The Blaze being repeated on Beck's shows as statement of fact.

Maybe the people at The Blaze who help put together Beck's programming ought to start reading their own reporting.

Stemberger: New Anti-Gay Scouting Organization Like The Resurrection Of Jesus

John Stemberger was the guest on "WallBuilders Live" today, discussing the new anti-gay alternative to the Boy Scouts that will be announced later this Fall.

During the discussion, Stemberger stated that with the formation of this new organization, something good will finally result from the vote by the Boy Scouts of America to allow gay scouts, likening it to the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus.

"Sometimes things have to die," Stemberger said, "before there's a new birth and it comes back better than before. And, not to extend the analogy too far, but even our Lord went through that process":

Later, co-host Rick Green asked Stemberger what he would say to a Boy Scout leader who was thinking of remaining with the Scouts because this is not an issue for them because they don't have any openly gay boys wanting to join their troop.  Stemberger responded by warning that gay activists will begin to "strategically place openly gay boys in troops, especially very conservative troops and see if they will, you know, deny them membership based on the fact that they are flaunting their sexuality" in order to file lawsuits:

Near the end of the broadcast, David Barton picked up on Stemberger's warming to issue a warning of his own that "little sins always grow to become big sins that will turn and devour you."  To illustrate this point, Barton cited  naturalist Joy Adamson, who wrote the book "Born Free" about her experience raising a lion cub.

"Joy Adamson is a name back years ago out of Africa.  She did the famous movie and the book 'Born Free' and then 'Living Free' where she raised the lion cubs and Elsa was a lion cub and she ends up getting killed by her favorite lions that she's raised from cubs":

Of course, like so much of what Barton says, this is not true at all, as Adamson was actually murdered by a former employee, not killed by lions. 

David Barton Doesn't Understand Why Atheists Are So Angry

Today on "WallBuilders Live," David Barton and Rick Green hosted Ray Comfort, who was on to promote his new "God vs Evolution" film, which he claims utterly destroys the theory of evolution.

Following the conversation, Barton commented that atheists are really angry about the film and are, in fact, pretty angry in general about all sorts of things, which doesn't make any sense.  After all, Barton said, he doesn't believe in UFOs or Bigfoot, but he is not out there trying to shut down people who do:

You challenge what they believe about evolution and they get angry. And you ask them questions they can't answer about their own belief, they get angry.  And I was thinking too, you know, they do that in so many areas, including faith areas.

I mean, here I am, I don't believe in UFOs but, you know, there are some UFO societies out there - in December, I drove through Roswell, New Mexico and all the UFO societies - but I'm not suing to close them down. I'm not mad at them.  I'm not angry with them. I just don't believe in them.

In the same way, you know, the series that was on TV last year about in search of Bigfoot.  Hey, I don't believe in the Loch Ness Monster or Bigfoot or Sasquatch, but I'm not suing to shut these people down because they don't believe like I believe.

I've had people tell me, hey, we never landed on the moon; that was a big government conspiracy and it never happened.  I'm not looking to shut them down. I'm not mad about them believing that.  I just think they're wrong. 

Why is it that atheists get mad? If they don't believe in God, then why do they care if we do.  And yet they go out there, working so hard and they're so angry to shut down every expression.  There's groups that I don't agree with and I don't believe with, but I'm not angry at them and I'm not looking to shut down their existence.

And [Comfort] is right: atheists get angry because they do know that God exists.  That's what makes them mad.

First of all, anyone who preaches that "hate is a virute" probably ought not to be lecturing others about being angry.

And secondly, it should be noted that believers in UFOs and Bigfoot don't have powerful, like-minded allies in Congress, nor do they have dozens of influential political organizations all operating with the goal of forcing the existence of Bigfoot and E.T. to be taught in public schools as fact and generally working to ensure that such beliefs form the basis of this nation's public policy.

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