Donald Trump

PFAW Response to New Hampshire Republican Primary Results

With New Hampshire primary results in, People For the American Way President Michael Keegan released the following statement:

"That Donald Trump--who launched his campaign by calling Mexican immigrants 'rapists' and continued by calling for a 'complete shutdown' of Muslim people entering our country--has won the New Hampshire primary is all the evidence anyone should need to understand that the GOP has gone completely off the rails.

"We also must not ignore the fact that the runners up in New Hampshire are extreme in their own right. From moving to end all abortion access, to smearing all immigrants as possible terrorists, to pandering to the most extreme and violent voices in the GOP, the entire Republican presidential field is ignoring the priorities of most Americans and instead pushing a far-right agenda.”

###

Right Wing Round-Up - 2/9/16

Donald Trump: Maybe Obama Doesn't Want To Stop Terrorism

Sending a dog whistle to the GOP’s anti-Obama base, Donald Trump has taken to saying that “there’s something we don’t know about” the president when it comes to issues like terrorism and the resettlement of Syrian refugees.

While Trump has never come out and said what that he thinks that “something” is, the GOP presidential frontrunner told conservative radio host Michael Savage yesterday that he believes Obama may actually be a terrorist sympathizer.

“It’s radical Islamic terrorism,” Trump said. “We have a president that won’t even use the words and if you don’t use the words, you’re never going to get rid of the problem. We have a — maybe he doesn’t want to get rid of the problem. I don’t know exactly what’s going on.”

Donald Trump Agrees to PFAW’s Call to Return Contribution from White Nationalist

Today, as reported by The Hill, Donald Trump said in response to a question asked by People For the American Way (PFAW) New Hampshire Campaign Coordinator Lindsay Jakows that he would return a contribution from White Nationalist William Daniel Johnson. As Jakows referenced in the question, last week, PFAW had called on Trump to return the contribution.

PFAW President Michael B. Keegan stated:

“We’re very glad to hear that Donald Trump responded to public pressure and will return the contribution from self-described white nationalist William Daniel Johnson. This is a good first step, but Trump should follow up by renouncing the racist policies he’s been espousing on the campaign trail. Xenophobia and racism should have no place in any campaign, but we’ve seen far too much of it during the 2016 Republican presidential primary.”

Audio of the question from Lindsay Jakows:



Johnson, who refers to himself as a “white nationalist” and has specifically said that he wants “a white ethno-state, a country made up of only white people,” recorded robocalls in December 2015 to Iowans to support Donald Trump because of his bigoted stance on immigration. Earlier this month, it was revealed that he also donated to the Trump campaign.

###

Congressional Republicans Promote 2016 'Ideas' Strategy, Warn Against Trump At Heritage 'Conservative Policy Summit'

The Heritage Foundation’s political advocacy affiliate, Heritage Action for America, held an all-day “Conservative Policy Summit” on Wednesday, during which Heritage staff and supporters heard from nearly two dozen conservative Republican members of Congress. Heritage's president, former U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint, reaffirmed one of the organization’s longstanding principles — that you can’t legitimately call yourself an economic conservative if you aren’t also a social conservative.

The morning consisted of speeches on “conservative policy pillars” – House Speaker Paul Ryan on leadership, Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa on defense, Rep. Mark Walker of North Carolina on social policy, and Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska on economic policy. The afternoon was built around panel discussions on the House Freedom Caucus, the freshman class, differences in the workings of the House and Senate, and the state of the conservative movement. What was meant to be a closing debate on the filibuster between Rep. Bob Goodlatte and Sen. Mike Lee turned into a moderated conversation with Lee — who defends the filibuster against frustrated right-wing House members — when Goodlatte didn’t show.

Ryan’s opening speech set a mostly high-minded tone, saying conservatives must address Americans who are hurting and convince them that a conservative pro-growth agenda offers them more promise than “failed” liberal policies. He called for a “clarifying election” that would, like Ronald Reagan’s 1980 victory, come with a mandate to enact conservative policies. Ryan warned that with one more progressive presidency “liberals will lock in all their gains” — and that Democrats’ refusal to deal with entitlement reform would ensure monetary and fiscal crises.

In remarks that may have been intended for his Heritage Action hosts and members of the Freedom Caucus, Ryan urged conservatives not to engage in a “circular firing squad” or waste time fighting over tactics or impugning one others’ motives. “We can’t let how someone votes on an amendment to an appropriations bill define what it means to be conservative, because it’s setting our sights too low,” he said.

Ryan also said Republicans must not be merely oppositional. He suggested that conservatives who promised to repeal Obamacare while Obama was still in office were merely setting themselves up for failure. He said House Republicans are putting together a five part ideas-based agenda that will define the year in the areas of national security, jobs and the economy, healthcare, poverty and opportunity, and restoring the Constitution.

Rep. Mark Walker, a Southern Baptist minister, was introduced by Heritage’s Jennifer Marshall as a champion of the right-wing social agenda on marriage, abortion and religious liberty. Walker said the country was founded on traditional values, but that decades of liberal policies have led to the “undoing” of communities: “The federal government has hijacked the American Dream and the family has been decimated.”

Walker said Congress must “eliminate every taxpayer dollar that goes to Planned Parenthood,” saying, “There is no other freedom-robbing, opportunity-destroyer and life-killer that is more intentional than Planned Parenthood.”  Walker did not directly address the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling or the resistance to the ruling being pushed by some social conservatives. In a question about how to make marriage fashionable, he said the church has to do its job in teaching the truth about family.

Walker said people are right to be angry about some things, like classrooms indoctrinating students with “progressive secularism,” and said that anger can be a powerful motivator if properly targeted. He urged people to be discerning and compassionate in order to more effectively make the conservative case. “It’s okay to be a loud voice as long as you’re doing more than just making noise,” he said.

Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska, a former college president tasked with talking about economic freedom, said that the American idea of limited government and conservatives’ commitment to the free market are grounded in “an anthropological claim about human dignity.” Like other speakers, Sasse denounced what he described as regulatory overreach. He disputed the characterization by former Democratic Rep. Barney Frank that government is “another word for the things we choose to do together.” No, said Sasse, government is not community, but compulsion, power and force.

Sasse seemed to criticize Donald Trump’s campaign without mentioning the candidate by name (something Ryan had also done), saying it was wrong to think that government power or a single election can fix things.

A lot of what is happening in the Republican electorate right now is the downstream effects of the tribalism of race, class and gender identity politics on the left, that some of the right have decided, well, if they’re going to have an identity politics, maybe we should have an identity politics. And that is an abandonment of the American idea. We already have one post-constitutional party in this country; we don’t need a second one. And so the idea that there is a strongman that can save us isn’t true. It’s understandable why it can be attractive, but it isn’t true. And so if you pretend that if only we gave more power to one guy in Washington, but he was the right guy, everything would be fixed, I submit to you that that act is the act of saying everything is already lost in the American experiment. Because what America needs is a constitutional recovery, not a Republican Barack Obama.

A panel with members of the House Freedom Caucus — what moderator Fred Barnes referred to affectionately as the “Bomb-thrower Caucus” — included Reps. Jim Jordan of Ohio, Raul Labrador of Idaho, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Mick Mulvaney of South Carolina. A common theme of their remarks was that Republicans in Congress have lost the trust of the American people by overpromising and under-delivering because too many of them get to D.C. and get talked into being a “team player.” Members of the Freedom Caucus and panel of House freshmen all seemed optimistic that the House would function more effectively under the speakership of Paul Ryan than it did under deal-maker John Boehner.

Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia talked about the new Article I project that has been launched by Sen. Mike Lee of Utah and others, which is designed to limit the regulatory power of federal agencies and the discretionary power of the president. (Lee and Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Texas described the Article I project in National Review this week.) Later in the day Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona also mentioned the project, saying he hoped it would reinvigorate the constitutional balance between the legislative and other branches.

But in spite of the perils they said face America, panelists were positive about the state of the conservative movement. Rep. Gary Palmer of Alabama noted that the conservative movement today has many assets that Ronald Reagan didn’t, including a national network of state-level think tanks and advocacy organizations, political groups devoted to candidate recruitment and training and grassroots mobilization, and GOP control in most statehouses and legislatures. Rep. Dave Brat of Virginia, who waged the right-wing insurgent campaign that defeated former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in a Republican primary, predicted a conservative wave election. And Rep. Bill Flores of Texas said the conservative movement is strong, as reflected in the success of “outsider” candidates in the Iowa caucuses and the majorities in the House and Senate — there’s just “one big step to go.”

Donald Trump's A 'Big Fan' Of The 'Amazing' Ann Coulter

It’s no secret that Donald Trump likes the work of anti-immigrant extremist Ann Coulter, but he had a chance to tell her so publicly in a radio interview shortly before Coulter took the stage at a Trump campaign rally in New Hampshire last night.

Boston talk radio host Howie Carr, who was broadcasting from the Trump event in Milford, New Hampshire, put Coulter on the line with Trump as she prepared to speak and Trump prepared to head over to the event. Coutler told Trump that he is “doing a fantastic job” and that he would “love” her speech.

“Ann’s been amazing,” Trump responded, adding, “I’m a big fan and you know that.”

Trump also took the opportunity to go after his “low-energy” opponent Jeb Bush, joking that “he probably paid $5 million” for a recent crowd at a campaign event.

“I don’t know, Jeb is out there, he’s spent $100 million, it’s sad actually what’s going on with Jeb, he’s got no votes, he’s down around two [percent] and I think it’s a pretty sad situation,” he said.

Trump added that “most” of his Republican rivals will probably soon drop out of the race.

Alex Jones: 'They Might Kill' Donald Trump Just Like MLK And The Kennedys

On Monday, as Alex Jones’ InfoWars network broadcast special coverage of the Iowa caucuses, Jones himself called in to share important information about his favorite candidate and past guest, Donald Trump.

With his face pressed up against the camera, Jones criticized Salon for running an article based on a report in Politico that called the New York mogul’s presidential campaign a “calculated con job.” Jones said Salon and others are trying to discredit Trump because they know he wants to save America, adding that he was told by “insiders” that “Trump is freaked out, he can’t believe they’re putting cancer viruses in the vaccines.” 

His sources also informed him that “Trump is a listener” to his radio show, which may explain Trump’s anti-vaxxer attitude

Jones, who then took time to recount how the Democratic Party had supposedly sent people to “physically attack” him for criticizing Bill Clinton, assured his viewers that “Trump’s awake” and “knows what’s going on,” and that’s why global elites want to stop him, just as they stopped Martin Luther King Jr. and Jack and Bobby Kennedy for trying to “empower humanity.”

“He actually wants to be the guy that can save America,” Jones continued. “That’s why the Bilderberg group is so scared of him. That’s why the whole elite is piling on against him. That’s why they’re doing everything they can to stop him. You think Trump’s stupid, folks? If he gets elected and doesn’t try to deliver, he will be the lowest-valued thing on earth, he will be the trash to be taken home. He’s not going to do that. And that’s why I think we’re going to see an epic battle now. They’re going to do anything they can to stop Donald Trump, folks, just like they stopped Martin Luther King or Bobby Kennedy and JFK.”

Speaking with conservative activist Larry Klayman yesterday about Donald Trump’s candidacy, Jones warned: “I think they might kill him.”

Steve Deace: Trump Voters Are Like Pagan Cult Followers

Earlier today, Iowa talk radio host and Ted Cruz endorser Steve Deace unloaded on Cruz’s critics in an interview with American Family Radio’s Sandy Rios following the Texas Republican senator’s victory in the Iowa caucuses.

Deace was particularly angry about Mike Huckabee’s “absolutely heinous” and “despicable” attacks on Cruz’s faith, but he also spent time going after Donald Trump’s supporters, including Sarah Palin and Jerry Falwell Jr., claiming that the two Religious Right leaders overlooked all of Trump’s liberal stances and dirty tactics because of his tough anti-immigration rhetoric.

“It doesn’t make any sense,” Deace said of Trump’s prominent backers, alluding to rumors propagated Rep. Steve King, another prominent Iowa endorser of Cruz, that Trump’s more prominent supporters had financial motives to back the business mogul.

“He was essentially betraying us on every single issue,” Deace said of Trump, likening the billionaire to Ahab, the idolatrous king of Israel who was married to Jezebel. “I can’t even begin to tell you how intellectually dishonest Donald Trump was in Iowa the last couple of weeks of this campaign,” he continued. “He did everything but call Ted Cruz an illegal alien. I’ve never seen anything like it … There was nothing Donald Trump would not say, there was nothing Donald Trump would not do.”

Later in the broadcast, Deace compared Trump voters to cult followers who are embracing “nationalism” and “worship of the state” over their Christian faith.

“I have never seen a cult, and I’m including Obama, I have never seen a cult surrounding a candidate in my life like the one around Donald Trump,” he said. “You engage his followers on social media and they don’t want to know any truth and they’re proudly, belligerently ignorant about it. And I want to just say this to our fellow believers on your program this morning: Be wary of nationalism. Nationalism is a pagan philosophy and when it co-opts the church it always leads to tyranny.”

People For the American Way Calls on Trump to Return Contribution from White Nationalist

In response to new data that the Donald Trump campaign accepted a contribution from White Nationalist William Daniel Johnson, People For the American Way calls for Donald Trump to immediately return the contribution.

People For the American Way President Michael Keegan stated:

“Last year, when a White Nationalist was running racist robocalls backing Donald Trump, Trump brushed it off and said he would ‘disavow’ that kind of support. Now is his chance to show whether or not he means it by returning the contribution immediately. Trump can bash ‘political correctness’ all he wants, but anyone who aspires to our nation’s highest office should understand that cashing checks from those pushing an explicitly racist agenda is unacceptable.”

Johnson, who refers to himself as a “white nationalist” and has specifically said that he wants “a white ethno-state, a country made up of only white people,” recorded robocalls in December 2015 to Iowans to support Donald Trump because of his bigoted stance on immigration. At the time, Trump said he "disavows" the ad.

###

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 2/1/16

  • It sounds like things are not going so well over at Glenn Beck's media empire.
  • You won't find this kind of hard-hitting news anywhere else! "BarbWire ahead of the Game in Reporting on Obama’s Breastfeeding Troops."
  • Steven Andrew provides four reasons why Mike Huckabee "would be the greatest president since Lincoln."
  • Rep. Steve King says that Donald Trump is buying his endorsements and Trump-endorser Sarah Palin thinks that King might be "huffing ethanol."
  • Jerry Johnson, president and CEO of the National Religious Broadcasters, says that he wants the NRB "to be for the First Amendment, what NRA is for the Second Amendment."
  • Finally, Donald Trump is now openly encouraging his crowds to "knock the crap" out of hecklers and promising to pay any legal fees.

'I Have Not Gotten The Big Things Wrong': Glenn Beck Begs Iowa Voters Not To Support Donald Trump

Today, Glenn Beck revealed that he has converted his radio studio into a full-scale replica of the Oval Office and will now be broadcasting his daily radio program from this room:

Why Beck spent who knows how much money constructing an Oval Office replica to be used for a radio broadcast is anybody's guess, not to mention how much it'll cost to ship it all to Jerusalem so Beck can continue to broadcast once America collapses.

And while he may have a fancy new set, not much else about the program has changed, as it still features Beck begging voters in Iowa not to vote for Donald Trump and to heed his warning "because I have not gotten the big things wrong."

"I beg you," Beck said. "If you have ever listened to me and you have heard 1999/Osama bin Laden, the banking crash of '08, the caliphate, and those are just the big ones."

Beck admitted that while he may have been wrong about a few small things here and there, "I've not gotten the ones wrong where I said, 'I'll fall on my sword,' have I? Where I said, "Listen guys, I know this one to be true.'"

"I have not gotten the big things wrong," Beck insisted, claiming that he foresaw 9/11, the 2008 economic collapse and, falsely, the rise of the caliphate in the Mideast. This, of course, conveniently brushes aside all of the things he has demonstrably gotten wrong as meaningless and unimportant, especially in comparison to the few "big things" that he supposedly got right.

Nevertheless, Beck insisted that his warning about Trump is one of those "big things" and therefore is something that should be heeded.

"If you have ever, ever taken to heart what I am saying," Beck told voters in Iowa, "please, please do not vote for Donald Trump. Please! ... This guy is a very dangerous guy."

Iowans should not vote for Trump, he continued, especially considering that they have an opportunity to vote for Ted Cruz.

"This is the guy," Beck said. "I've never felt this way. I've never endorsed anybody. Ever! This is the guy. I truly believe he was raise for this time!"

Klingenschmitt Promotes Column Denouncing Trump As 'Demonic'

Colorado State Rep. Gordon Klingenschmitt, aka, “Dr. Chaps,” is promoting on his “Pray in Jesus Name” website a column by a Ted Cruz backer who denounces Donald Trump as “demonic” and says Trump voters are seeking a “false Messiah.”

The column’s author, Chicago-based pundit Andre Traversa, describes himself as “an online radio talk-show host, media consultant, and Bible-believing Christian with a deep concern for this nation.” Traversa sees in Ted Cruz “the opportunity to elect the most ideologically conservative president I’ve seen in my lifetime.”

He says that as Trump’s attacks on Cruz “assumed a dark and malicious character,” he realized “this was no ordinary political squabble, but a battle between the forces of light and darkness.”

When God revealed this to me, I felt called to spend a week in fasting and prayer. Today is my 6th day of having only juice and water, while I seek the Lord in prayer for our nation, as well as for revival in my own heart, life, and personal relationships.

For the last several months, I have increasingly felt that Trump voters were seeking a false messiah, asking Trump to be their personal Savior.

Traversa criticizes what he says are blatant lies that he says Trump’s “low information voters” don’t seem to care about.

In the last few days, Trump’s demonic face has become even more apparent, even to the point of blasphemy.

On Friday, Trump claimed that if people were depressed due to losing their job, “I will lift your depression, I will make you happy.”

Does Trump think he’s Jesus, who can heal our wounds and save us from ourselves? And speaking of Jesus, notice how Trump never mentions him, even while he claims to be a Christian.

Traversa says the Republican establishment would prefer Trump because Cruz will not make deals with them, and that Cruz is “a man of God” who “has promised to attract millions of non-voting Christians to the polls, which would change American politics forever.” That’s why, he reasons, Cruz is being attacked.

This prospect scares the daylights out of the elites in both parties, who hate the name of Jesus more than they’ll ever publicly admit.

Make no mistake, our war is not against flesh and blood, but against powers and principalities, and spiritual wickedness in high places.

A Bible-believing Christian president is a powerful weapon against demonic forces.

Do your part in Iowa, vote Cruz, and fight on the side of righteousness. 

Ben Carson: Ask Trump His Views On Marriage And 'Abnormal Relationships'

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson said on Friday that GOP frontrunner Donald Trump could prove his conservatism by answering questions like, “What are your feelings on marriage?” and, “What constitutes a normal relationships or is an abnormal relationship?”

Carson has previously referred to LGBT people as “a few people who perhaps are abnormal.”

Newsmax TV host Steve Malzberg asked Carson on Friday if he was “concerned about Donald Trump’s lack of a conservative record.”

“I think maybe people put too much emphasis on labels,” Carson responded, adding that interviewers should instead “delve deeply into what he believes.”

“Why not examine him?” Carson said. “Say, ‘What is your feeling about life? When does life begin? What are your feelings about marriage? What constitutes a normal relationships or is an abnormal relationship?’ You know, question him on these things and see what he says.”

When Malzberg asked him if he thought Trump skipped last week’s Fox News presidential debate in order to avoid such questions, Carson responded, “I don’t know. I don’t think it’s because he was afraid of Megyn Kelly.”

Trump Campaign Manager Demands Ted Cruz And Carly Fiorina Give Money To Vets After Debate Flap

When Donald Trump announced that he would skip last week’s Fox News debate in order to raise money “for the vets” — an event that actually benefited his personal foundation — two of his opponents said that they too would give money to veterans, but only if Trump debated them one-on-one.

Super PACs aligned with Ted Cruz offered to give $1.5 million to veterans’ causes if Trump would debate their candidate, while Carly Fiorina upped the ante with a $2 million offer. Trump declined to take either candidate up on their offer, but his campaign is now insisting that they donate the money to veterans’ charities anyway.

Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, who said last week that Trump would only debate Cruz if he offers proof that he’s “legally eligible to run for president of the United States,” told radio host John Fredericks today that he wants the Cruz and Fiorina camps to give the money to veterans’ causes anyway.

People understand Trump’s a doer, so he goes out, he says he’s going to do something, we raise $6 million for the veterans, we give that money away, it was a great night and I don’t think that anybody would be willing to say the veterans don’t deserve the money. These candidates who say, ‘If you debate me or you do this or you do that, we’ll give you money,’ they’re so disingenuous. Mr. Trump doesn’t need anybody’s money. He put $1 million of his own money into that veterans event to prove that his support is real. But all the other candidates, whether it’s Carly Fiorina or it’s Ted Cruz who said, ‘If you do this, we’ll give money to veterans,’ well, if you care about the veterans, don’t make it a quid pro quo, put your money where your mouth is, Ted or Carly, and give the money to the veterans if you truly care about them.

Perhaps Cruz and Fiorina were merely modeling themselves after Trump, who in 2012 said he would donate $5 million to charity but only if President Obama released his records from college and passport applications.

Bryan Fischer: 'The Proper Christian Response' To A Gay Couple's Wedding Is 'Grief And Sorrow'

Bryan Fischer invited Peter LaBarbera on to his radio program today so that LaBarbera could share his "research" on which of the GOP presidential candidates are insufficiently anti-gay and therefore should not receive the support of conservative Christian voters this primary season.

Donald Trump was at the top of the list, LaBarbera explained, because he once attended a gay wedding and called it "beautiful."

"Trump went to a so-called gay wedding himself of a friend in New York," LaBarbera said, "and he was quoted as saying, 'It was a beautiful thing.' Trump said that the gay wedding, so-called, that he went to between two men was a beautiful thing. And you have to ask yourself, Bryan, how many Christians ... would say that a homosexual so-called marriage is a beautiful thing?"

Fischer, of course, totally agreed.

"If you have a biblical worldview, you'd be grieved for them," he said. "You'd be grieved for what they're heading into, grieved for the way in which homosexual behavior separates them from God, the risks that it's putting them at, the risk that it's going to put children to if they're adopted into that household. So the proper response would not be joy, it would not be celebration; the proper Christian response would grief and sorrow over what these two people are doing to themselves and also to others."

Louie Gohmert: Conservative Christians Back Trump Because They're Being Persecuted

Yesterday, Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, spoke with Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council about Donald Trump’s appeal to evangelical voters.

While both Gohmert and Perkins have endorsed Ted Cruz and were campaigning for the Texas senator in Iowa before the “Washington Watch” interview, the two said that Trump is winning over some conservative evangelicals because they are fed up with anti-Christian “persecution” and “sick of the nation being fundamentally transformed away from being a Christian nation.”

How a sitting member of Congress can possibly believe that he is facing persecution for being a member of the country’s largest religious group shows just how absurd Religious Right’s persecution narrative has become. And, ironically enough, these conservative leaders are now worrying that their manufactured paranoia of religious persecution may end up sinking their preferred candidate and help Trump.

Gohmert: I understand where so many believers, so many Christians have been in the past seven years, we now are experiencing something I never thought I would experience in my life, I never experienced it growing up and it’s what Jesus promised us would happen, and that is, ‘You will be persecuted for my sake.’ I never got persecuted growing up in Texas and I bet you didn’t in Louisiana, but we’re being persecuted now, Christians are being persecuted here for our religious beliefs and I think people are so sick of the nation being fundamentally transformed away from being a Christian nation.

You know, it reminds me maybe of the children of Israel. They had not been as faithful to God as they should have and things weren’t going like they wanted so they said, ‘God, give us a king and he can fix all this,’ and God said, ‘That’s not what’s going to fix it and it’s not a good idea.’ But I get the feeling people are thinking, if we can just have somebody that is as narcissistic and self-centered and will stand up to anybody as Obama is, then that person can go back and fix it. That’s a problem.

Perkins: What I see as I travel the country is there’s a fear, a fear that the country has changed, that we’re losing the country, just a fear of the loss of religious freedom. But we have to operate in faith, not fear. Fear causes us to make the wrong choices and go the wrong direction.

Right Wing Round-Up - 1/28/16

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 1/28/16

  • "Coach" Dave Daubenmire wants to make it clear "that I am a Ted Cruz supporter ... but I am not afraid of Donald Trump."
  • Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum will be joining Trump at the veterans event he is hosting as he boycotts tonight's Fox News debate.
  • Mark Creech says that the scarcity of "genuine prophets" and "prophets like Jesus" is to blame for evangelical support for Donald Trump.
  • Cruz's campaign co-chair Bob Vander Plaats knows why the people of Iowa will support Cruz: "People in Iowa – we're first in the nation for a reason. We want to find out what makes a person tick, and what makes a person tick is typically their faith."
  • Finally, Marco Rubio wants you to know that "I believe in God and that God has blessed America."

Trump Tweets Photoshopped Image Of Megyn Kelly From Racist Account

Donald Trump’s Twitter account is a notorious cesspool of bigotry, where the business mogul and Republican presidential frontrunner frequently retweets the thoughts of white supremacists, including fans of Adolf Hitler, and once promoted fake crime statistics fabricated by neo-Nazis, which he later defended as “very credible.”

This morning, in the midst of a feud with Fox News and its anchor Megyn Kelly, Trump retweeted an image of Kelly meeting a Saudi prince and a woman dressed in a niqab.

As you have probably already guessed, the image is fake. And as you have also probably guessed, the tweet came from an unabashed racist who also tweeted images of Michelle Obama as a monkey and having sex with an ape.

Not that Trump ever seems to care about the accuracy of anything he says.

Share this page: Facebook Twitter Digg SU Digg Delicious