Phyllis Schlafly

How Phyllis Schlafly Paved The Way For Donald Trump

Conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, who died yesterday at the age of 92, was an early and ardent supporter of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, one of the few Religious Right leaders who embraced the thrice-married, brash business mogul before they were left with no other option.

Schlafly’s love of Trump was hardly surprising: For decades, she has fought to build a Republican Party that rejects immigrants, stirs up fears of communists (and now Muslims), condemns “globalism,” eschews “political correctness,” and does it all with the veneer of protecting the “traditional family.” Trump was the candidate she had been waiting for.

Schlafly got her start as an anti-communist activist in the 1950s and 1960s, defending Sen. Joe McCarthy’s notorious communist hunt until the end and canceling her subscription to The National Review when it denounced the conspiratorial anti-communist John Birch Society. In 1964, she self-published a book called “A Choice Not An Echo,” urging the GOP to reject moderation and back Sen. Barry Goldwater’s presidential run; that year, Goldwater lost the presidential election in a landslide but made an indelible impact on the Republican Party.

But Schlafly really made a name for herself as the nation’s most famous anti-feminist, leading the successful fight to stop the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s. Throughout her career, Schlafly denounced “the feminists” and their goals, even as she became a successful career woman in her own right. (Schlafly’s niece later admitted that even as the activist exulted stay-at-home mothering as the natural role of women, she hired domestic help to help her manage balancing her career and childrearing.)

Through her group Eagle Forum, Schlafly remained active in a long list of conservative causes after the ERA was defeated.

Later in her career, Schlafly denounced equal pay legislation, saying that the “so-called pay gap” should actually be increased to help women find husbands who earn more than them. In 2007, she said that it was impossible for a husband to rape his wife because “by getting married, the woman has consented to sex.” A staunch opponent of abortion rights, Schlafly founded the Republican National Coalition for Life to ensure that the GOP remained an anti-choice party.

Hand-in-hand with Schlafly’s anti-feminism was her staunch opposition to LGBT rights. One of her primary arguments against the Equal Rights Amendment was that it would eventually lead to marriage equality and other rights for LGBT people. Her views on the issue didn’t waver even after her son John, who remains active in Eagle Forum, was outed as gay.

In recent years, Schlafly turned much of her attention to fighting immigration, and particularly to fighting efforts within the GOP to be more welcoming to immigrants. After the Republican National Committee responded to Mitt Romney’s loss in the 2012 presidential election by issuing an “autopsy” report that urged the party to stop alienating Latinos, partially by considering immigration reform, Schlafly lashed out, saying that there was no hope for the GOP to win Latinos. Latinos, she said, don’t “have any Republican inclinations at all” because “they’re running an illegitimacy rate that’s just about the same as the blacks are.” She added that Latinos “come from a country where they have no experience with limited government. And the types of rights we have in the Bill of Rights, they don’t understand that at all, you can’t even talk to them about what the Republican principle is.”

Schlafly attacked President Obama for bringing in “foreign ideas and diseases and people who don’t believe in self-government” and repeatedly declared that current levels of immigration are destroying America. In response to people skeptical of Trump’s plan to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants, Schlafly scoffed. “In my mind’s eye,” she said, “I see those railroad cars full of illegals going south. That’s what they ought to do.” Schlafly made clear that her objection was not to immigration in general, but to the fact that many immigrants were coming from Latin America, saying last year that while it is “quite true that America was built by hard-working people from all over the world,” today’s immigrants are “not the same sort” as the mostly European immigrants who flocked to the country in the early 20th century.

She tried to square this anti-immigrant sentiment with her Christian beliefs by claiming that the Bible’s demands of “kindness and compassion” to strangers do not apply to the government’s treatment of immigrants.

It’s no wonder that Schlafly loved Trump, who offered to deliver the Religious Right’s policy priorities while putting his heart into fighting immigration and stirring up fears of the supposed radical Muslim infiltration of America. Schlafly stuck with Trump, whom she introduced at a St. Louis campaign rally, even as her support for his candidacy helped to tear apart both her organization and her family. In the month's before Schlafly's death, her daughter joined other Eagle Forum officials in a lawsuit that seeking the ouster of Schalfly’s handpicked, pro-Trump successor. Fittingly, Schlafly’s final book was released today. It’s called “The Conservative Case for Trump.”

Trump may seem like something new in the political system, but he’s exactly the kind of candidate Schlafly spent her life priming the GOP to accept.

Eagle Forum President: 'You're Not Racist If You Don't Like Mexicans'

Ed Martin, the former chairman of the Missouri GOP who now runs Phyllis Schlafly’s group Eagle Forum, gave some interesting remarks about Mexicans and Muslims to a St. Louis area Tea Party rally over the weekend, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

Ed Martin, who ran for Missouri attorney general four years ago and now is the chief spokesman and ally to conservative icon Phyllis Schlafly, said at a Tea Party rally in the St. Louis area Sunday:

"You're not racist if you don't like Mexicans. They're from a nation. If you don't think Muslims are vetted enough, because they blow things up, that's not racist."

Martin told the Post-Dispatch in a written statement that his comments regarding Mexicans were aimed only at illegal immigrants.

Regarding his comments on Muslims, he said: "My point is that it is not racist to make clear that some Muslims should not be coming to America. They are not a race but a religion and there are white, black and brown Muslims and we need to make sure that the ones who wish us ill are not allowed to enter America."

Martin has been at the center of an ugly internal feud at Eagle Forum. Longtime board members, including some of Schlafly’s own children, have objected to her choice of Martin to replace her at the group she founded and to her endorsement of Donald Trump for president.

Former GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson will be headlining Eagle Forum’s upcoming national conference in St. Louis.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 8/26/16

  • Bryan Fischer helpfully explains that “God has not called us to be nice” because “nice people are weak.” 
  • William Gheen says that if Trump “diverges” on immigration, then Nativists like himself “will be his worst enemy.” 
  • Paul Hair warns that the “Obama regime is using the U.S. Department of Agriculture to evangelize deviancy in traditionally traditional rural America.” 
  • Kent Bailey writes the “moral bankruptcy of Hillary Clinton is a bottomless pit, but it graphically illustrates how secular legalism and post-Christian “morality” are the driving forces behind America’s regressive march back to the primitive, godless and pagan roots of humanity.” 
  • Day Gardner of the National Black Pro-Life Union thinks black voters are under a trance: “It's infuriating that in this high tech day and age, many of my black brothers and sisters are of a 'stepford' mentality, sleep walking in a politically robotic-like existence. I want to shake them and say, wake up, smell the roses and the coffee! Stop voting for the same old politicians while hoping for different outcomes—face it ... it's not working!” 
  • Gary Cass of the Christian Anti-Defamation Commission declares that Hillary Clinton has embraced “a heretical liberal theology”:

Phyllis Schlafly Angry About Non-English Resources For Disaster Survivors

In a column today, Eagle Forum founder Phyllis Schlafly criticized the Obama administration for making sure that disaster relief services, such as the ongoing efforts to help flood victims in Louisiana, do not discriminate against survivors who have limited English proficiency.

Ensuring that relief agencies have materials in languages other than English, according to Schlafly, is part of a larger plan by President Obama “to transform America by undermining our common culture and language.”

People with limited English proficiency, she said, should simply “become proficient in English.”

With only five months left in the White House, Obama is still hard at work “fundamentally transforming” our country into something much different from the nation we all grew up in. Here are recent examples of how he is determined to transform America by undermining our common culture and language.

This month’s catastrophic flooding in Louisiana is said to be America’s worst national disaster not caused by an earthquake or a hurricane. While Obama continued playing golf on the exclusive island of Martha’s Vineyard, his federal bureaucrats are making sure that the crisis won’t go to waste.

On August 16, five federal agencies issued an incredible 16-page, single-spaced “Guidance” warning relief agencies not to discriminate in the use of disaster funds. Agencies receiving funds must “post a statement of nondiscrimination” on all public notices and “should also identify a point of contact for the public to submit complaints of discrimination.”

The Guidance refers to “unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin” which is prohibited by the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but it doesn’t stop there. It also tries to ban discrimination on account of “limited English proficiency,” which Congress has never prohibited.

The sneaky part is the way the federal Guidance includes the phrase “limited English proficiency,” as if the language you speak is part of your “national origin.” In fact, people from every country can and do learn English, and there is no good reason for our government to conduct official business in any other language.



Don’t assume that the Obama administration is merely responding to a genuine need for services by recent immigrants who have not yet learned English. In the name of multiculturalism, the administration is actively discouraging the transition to English by immigrants and their children, and promoting other languages instead.

The Men Who Say God Says A Woman Shouldn’t Be President

Hillary Clinton has faced her share of sexist attacks in her presidential campaign, and plenty of Clinton supporters have been accused of voting for her “just because she’s a woman,” but attacking Clinton explicitly for being a woman has generally been considered to be beyond the pale. Except, that is, among a small segment of Religious Right activists who believe that God proscribes women from taking political leadership roles and are willing to talk about it.

Back in 2008, when John McCain picked Sarah Palin to be his vice presidential running mate, some Religious Right leaders had muddled reactions to a female nominee who also happened to share many of their policy priorities.

The Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins explained that there was no contradiction in supporting a woman as vice president even though he is a member of a denomination that bars women from serving as pastors because the Bible only prohibits a woman from being a “spiritual leader.” Richard Land, then the head of the Southern Baptist Convention’s political arm, said that it was perfectly fine for Palin to serve in the role as long as her husband was okay with it. Al Mohler said that while he was thrilled with Palin’s politics, if he were her pastor he “would be concerned about how she could balance these responsibilities and what this would mean for her family and her roles as wife and mother.”

Michele Bachmann met some similar reactions when she ran for president in 2012, complicated by the fact that Bachmann herself had declared adherence to submission theology, the belief, as Sarah Posner has explained, that the “husband is the spiritual head of the household, the wife his obedient ‘helpmeet,’ the vessel for their children, devoted mother, and warrior for the faith.” Bachmann deflected those criticisms using logic similar to Perkins’, saying that the presidency “is not a spiritual position, it is a position of authority in our government, it is very different from that of a wife to her husband.”

Not everyone was convinced. While Bryan Fischer, then an official with the American Family Association, wrote early on in Bachmann’s campaign that the congresswoman was “in fact submitting to her husband by running for president ” because her husband had urged her to run, he did not seem completely convinced of his own point. Fischer said on his radio program the very same week that a woman should be allowed to become president only as a last resort “if God can't find any men with the spine and with the testicular fortitude” to lead. In that case, he said, God would “send a woman to do a man’s job.” As the election approached, Fischer went back to stating his belief that political leadership should be “reserved for the hands of males.”

It’s not surprising, then, that the question of whether a woman should be president has bubbled up again this year among some of the same people. Fischer declared this week that he doesn’t “believe that women should be entrusted with high political office,” implying that it would be reasonable to “vote for Trump because he's a man.”

Sam Roher, a former Pennsylvania state legislator who heads the American Pastors Network, which works to organize politically engaged conservative pastors, cited the book of Isaiah this month to argue that having women in political leadership is a mark of judgment upon a nation. “God does raise up women,” he explained, “there is no question about it, but the real condemnation is not the women in office, the condemnation is the disregard and the absolute inability for male leadership to perform as God intended it and I believe that that's the application for us now.”

Gary Dull, a board member of the pastors’ network who also runs its Pennsylvania chapter, used the same passage from Isaiah to argue more firmly that women should not lead nations. “In God's line of authority,” he said last month, “it seems very clear in the scripture that a woman should not be in authority over men, which would limit a woman from being the president of the United States of America or even a queen of some other particular nation.”

Kevin Swanson, a fringe pastor who nonetheless hosted three GOP presidential candidates at a campaign event in Iowa last year, responded to Clinton’s candidacy this month by saying that electing a female president would be “the final chapter” in feminists’ war against America. The white nationalist radio host James Edwards — a big Donald Trump fan — has cited “God’s law” to question whether a woman should be president.

And this isn’t even to mention the fringe activists who have said that women shouldn’t even be allowed to vote, including Theodore Shoebat, who recently managed to feed a conspiracy theory about Khizr Khan to the Trump campaign. Jesse Lee Peterson, a frequent guest on conservative talk shows, has also argued that women should never have been given the right to vote.

Those who think a female candidate should be disqualified from the presidency are mercifully few. And submission theology, which deals with a woman’s role in the household and the world, varies greatly among those who preach it. But as the reactions to Clinton’s candidacy have shown, the question of whether a woman should be president hasn’t been entirely settled in the Christian Right. After all, as Phyllis Schlafly says, who needs a woman president when “all our greatest presidents have been men"?

Happy Birthday, Phyllis Schlafly!

Today is the 92nd birthday of Phyllis Schlafly, the godmother of the right-wing movement in America. Schlafly broke onto the national scene with “A Choice Not an Echo,” her 1964 book making the case for Barry Goldwater, and she solidified her leadership with her successful campaign against the Equal Rights Amendment. Decades later, she helped rally right-wing opposition to President Obama, hosting a “How To Take Back America” conference during his first year in office. She’s still hard at work, leading Eagle Forum and publishing her Phyllis Schlafly Report newsletter, whose June issue argued for putting Trump’s wall—“and yes, Mexico will pay”—in this year’s Republican platform. Mission accomplished.

It hasn’t been the happiest year for Schlafly, who has been embroiled in a power struggle with a group of Eagle Forum board members, including her own daughter. She also lost a trademark lawsuit against her nephew, who makes Schlafly beer.

On the other hand, Schlafly was an early and ardent backer of Donald Trump, standing up for him in the primaries against many of her Religious Right allies and Eagle Forum colleagues. At this year’s Republican National Convention, Schlafly hosted a “Life of the Party” event celebrating that the GOP has been officially anti-abortion since 1976; she told attendees that she endorsed Trump after he pledged loyalty to a pro-life platform. Party attendees were given copies of the most recent of her more than two dozen books, “How the Republican Party Became Pro-Life.” It’s a short paperback that feels as if it was thrown together after having Schlafly tell war stories about her GOP platform battles over the years.

Schlafly spends most of the book recounting stories of pro-life activists’ efforts to strengthen and protect anti-abortion language at every Republican convention since 1976. It includes the successful resistance led by Schlafly, Ralph Reed, Bay Buchanan and Gary Bauer to Bob Dole’s efforts to soften the anti-abortion language in 1996. (I was in San Diego with a People For the American Way team covering that convention; Reed was gleeful about demonstrating his power to humiliate Dole, which may well have contributed to his November defeat.)

After the quick march through convention history, Schlafly moves into a denunciation of “judicial supremacy,” calling on Republicans to repudiate the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision. She also calls for nullification of 2015’s marriage equality ruling:

When supremacist judges presume to rewrite portions of our law, most especially if it is a law that we have had for millennia such as our law defining marriage, it’s time for the American people to speak up and say “No” just as Abe Lincoln did when supremacist judges ruled that blacks could be considered another man’s “property.” … All Americans must use every tool in the political process to reject judicial supremacy and return to government by “we the people.”

The book includes a short afterword by Kristan Hawkins, presidents of Students for Life, who calls Schlafly “a great American hero” and celebrates that, thanks to Schlafly and “her army,” there is today “no national Republican candidate who dares be anything other than pro-life!” The final 70 pages of the book, more than half its total length, is devoted to an appendix of anti-abortion and anti-marriage-equality references in Republican platforms and resolutions and excerpts from the 2012 platform.

Earlier this year, Schlafly urged Republican senators to hold firm in refusing to consider a Supreme Court nominee “until we have a Republican who will appoint somebody of the nature of Scalia,” telling her interviewer that the prospect of a Hillary Clinton presidency made her “scared to death.” Republican senators have done as she asked, and Schlafly got her wish in Cleveland with a solidly right-wing platform and the nomination of Donald Trump. But given what current polls suggest that November will bring, she may want to do her celebrating now.

 

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/21/16

  • James Dobson has officially endorsed Donald Trump. 
  • Roger Ailes has resigned from Fox News. 

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/20/16

  • Christian Broadcasting Network reporter David Brody hails Donald Trump Jr. as “the GOP JFK Jr.”
  • Pat Buchanan is thrilled that Donald Trump has dispensed with the “Bush idea of remaking America into a more ethnically, culturally, diverse nation through mass immigration, rooted in an egalitarian ideology.” 
  • Joseph Farah says if “black lives matter – and they surely do – the logical, rational, historical and practical course of action in 2016 is to vote Republican.”
  • Phyllis Schlafly bravely declares that America is “the ‘land of the free and home of the brave.’ We don’t need to adopt Muslim policies.”

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 5/24/16

  • We just realized that right-wing pastor Paul Blair is running for a seat in the Oklahoma legislature.
  • Rep. Renee Ellmers explains why she endorsed Donald Trump: "Women are forward thinking and they don't care what's happened in the past."
  • The Alabama State Republican Executive Committee passed a resolution in support of Roy Moore that calls on "the Court of the Judiciary to drop the politically motivated charges against" him.
  • Phyllis Schlafly says that "our society was built on a foundation of the traditional family unit with men and women accepting their responsibilities. Transgenderism is a threat to traditional gender roles and to the foundation of American society."
  • The Illinois Family Institute declares that "the public school system is not broken. On the contrary, it is doing exactly what it was designed to do: indoctrinate the next generation into a socialist perspective of voluntary slavery."
  • Finally, Judith Reisman warns that gays "aim to wipe out all morality – whatever legal mechanisms that have protected the weak from the strong for thousands of years, to allow hypersexualizing all, expecting still normal folks to 'get over it.' It will be all ages for sex and include no limitations. There are to be no boundaries or regulations with regard to sexual identity or behavior. Indoctrination of all, at least by kindergarten, that one’s sexuality is a fluid, changing construct."

Phyllis Schlafly: Call My Daughter And Ask Her To Stop 'Going After Me'

The family feud over who is in charge of Eagle Forum, the conservative “pro-family” group, got even nastier yesterday when the organization’s founder, Phyllis Schlafly, sent out a robocall to members giving them the phone number of her daughter, Anne Cori, and urging them to call her and “ask her to stop all of this.”

“Would you please help me stop these people from going after me and the organization that I have devoted my life to building?” she asked.

You can listen to the audio here, via Breitbart:

Schlafly has accused Cori and five other board members of the group’s political arm of trying to oust her.

Cori and her allies, however, claim that they only want to oust Ed Martin, Schlafly’s handpicked successor, whom they say is manipulating Schlafly and mismanaging the organization.

Martin, for his part, says that the dissident board members are just upset that Schlafly endorsed Donald Trump rather than their preferred presidential candidate, Ted Cruz.

Pointing her finger at the Cruz campaign, Schlafly has alleged that the Texas senator’s aides tried to make it appear that her group endorsed had Cruz and that the campaign underhandedly gotten its hands on Eagle Forum membership lists.

Schlafly has said that her two sons — Cori’s brothers — are also in the crosshairs of the rebellious board members.

“The only thing they’ve done is divide my family,” she said last month. “My daughter is with the group that is leading the assault on my leadership and they want to get rid of my son,” John Schlafly, the treasurer named, along with Martin, in the lawsuit brought by Cori and the other board members. She said that the dissident group also wants to get rid of her son Andy Schlafly, who does legal work for Eagle Forum.

Schlafly also claimed last month that Cori “is trying to tell me that she’s just doing this for my benefit, but I don’t need somebody to do something for my benefit, I’ve gotten along quite well all these years,” alleging that her daughter “lined up with some of the people who thought they could get good jobs at Eagle Forum if they got rid of me.”

The two parties are now in court after the Eagle Forum board voted to remove Martin from his position and install Cori as executive director, a vote that Schlafly said was invalid.

The robocall is just another sign that the fight over Eagle Forum hasn’t hit rock bottom just yet.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 5/12/16

  • Donald Trump’s longtime butler seems nice
  • Phyllis Schlafly, James Lyons and others are forming a pro-Trump super PAC called the Committee for American Sovereignty. 
  • Yet another study finds that there is “no difference in the incidence of abortion in countries where the procedure is legal versus where it is heavily restricted or outlawed.” 
  • Erik Rush writes that by “electing Barack Hussein Obama in 2008, America boarded a bullet train to Destination Socialism.” 
  • Anne Graham Lotz says it’s “still possible” Donald Trump would “turn to God” once he reaches the Oval Office.

Donald Trump Gets Backing Of Activists Who Deny Marital Rape, Oppose Women's Suffrage

It isn’t at all surprising that a candidate who has a long history of making misogynistic and degrading statements about women, has bragged about the endorsement of a convicted rapist, has talked about Hillary Clinton getting “schlonged,” and at one point backed the idea of punishing women who have abortions would attract the support of those with their own histories of troubling rhetoric about women.

Indeed, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has touted the endorsements of several politicians and activists who have done everything from denounce women’s suffrage to deny the existence of marital rape.

1) Phyllis Schlafly

Trump was quite honored to receive the endorsement of Phyllis Schlafly, who introduced him at a St. Louis rally and repeatedly praised his plans to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

Schlafly is the founder of the anti-feminist group Eagle Forum and is best known for helping defeat the Equal Rights Amendment.

Among her anti-feminist beliefs is the claim that marital rape does not exist.

“By getting married, the woman has consented to sex, and I don't think you can call it rape,” she said in 2007, later explaining that marital rape is simply a fabrication invented by feminists who want to levy the accusation when “they get tired of a husband” or “want to fight over child custody.” (Trump’s own lawyer has similarly claimed that marital rape is not rape).

Besides denying the existence of marital rape, she has blamed reports of sexual assaults on college campuses on the rising number of female college students, criticizing policies to combat assaults for turning college campuses into “a dangerous place for men.”

“There isn’t any rape culture,” she said in 2014. “There is a war on men.”

Colleges, according to Schlafly, should stop enforcing Title IX and install gender quotas to protect male admissions.

She has also proposed “increasing the so-called pay gap” between men and women in order to help women find husbands, since “the pay gay, really, is something that women like” as they would prefer to marry “a higher-earning man.”

2) Joe Arpaio

Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona, has been one of Trump’s biggest boosters, campaigning with the candidate and cheering on his anti-immigrant proposals.

Arpaio, who admits to keeping prisoners in a “concentration camp,” was challenged by the Justice Department over his widespread abuse and targeting of Latinos, particularly Latina women.

As Ian Millhiser noted in Think Progress, the Justice Department’s complaint cataloged instances where Arpaio’s deputies were “forcing women to sleep in their own menstrual blood,” “assaulting pregnant women,” “stalking Latina women” and “ignoring rape.”

Last year, The Guardian reports, Arpaio’s office “agreed to pay $3.5m to settle a lawsuit that alleged metro Phoenix’s sheriff botched the investigation into the rape of a 13-year-old girl and failed to arrest the suspect who then went on to sexually attack her again,” a case that “was among more than 400 sex-crime cases that were inadequately investigated or not looked into at all by Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio’s office during a three-year period ending in 2007.”

3) Ann Coulter

While Trump has been campaigning with conservative columnist Ann Coulter to promote her attacks on immigrants, we wonder if she will ever lead one of his campaign rallies in a chant against women’s suffrage.

Indeed, Coulter has repeatedly voiced her opposition to women having the right to vote, saying that revoking women’s suffrage is necessary to help elect Republicans.

This is far from Coulter’s only controversial views on women’s issues.

She once said that women who claim to have been raped are typically “girls trying to get attention” and refused to condemn the murder of abortion provider George Tiller, mocking concerns about violence against abortion providers.

4) Scott DesJarlais

Among the first members of Congress to endorse Trump was Tennessee Republican Scott DesJarlais, who along with some of his fellow GOP lawmakers met with Trump in March to work on ways to unify the party.

As we’ve noted, the GOP congressman has quite the record on women’s issues:

Before running for Congress as a “pro-life” and “pro-family” Republican, “DesJarlais, a physician, pressured a patient who was his mistress to get an abortion. It was later revealed that the pro-life congressman had approved of his first wife having two abortions, and that he’d had sex with at least two patients.” He also had affairs with “three coworkers and a drug representative,” and was later fined for violating medical ethics.

DesJarlais’ ex-wife also accused him of “dry firing a gun outside the Plaintiff's locked bedroom door, [admitting] suicidal ideation, holding a gun in his mouth for three hours, an incident of physical intimidation at the hospital; and previous threatening behavior ... i.e. shoving, tripping, pushing down, etc.”

5) Robert Jeffress

Texas-based pastor Robert Jeffress is one of Trump’s most outspoken Religious Right supporters and campaign surrogates. For instance, Jeffress rushed to Trump’s defense when he said that women who have abortions should face “some form of punishment.”

Jeffress, an enthusiastic conspiracy theorist, has also dismissed security threats against abortion providers and clinics and, like Trump, has some interesting thoughts about the 9/11 attacks.

The Southern Baptist pastor argued that God let the attacks take place because “he certainly won’t allow the sacrifice of children to go unpunished,” referring to legal abortion.

With endorsers like these, Trump will be well on his way to winning the women’s vote.

Phyllis Schlafly: Christian Leaders Must Quit Protesting And Rally Behind Donald Trump

Religious Right leaders typically claim that the Bible speaks to most political issues of the day. Once voters agree with their conservative take on what the Bible says about such matters, they argue, then Republican candidates will win elections in a landslide.

Rarely do we hear a movement leader urge pastors to quit talking about a political issue in biblical terms, but that is exactly what Eagle Forum founder and Donald Trump endorser Phyllis Schlafly did in her syndicated column today, telling Christian leaders to stop pursuing the cause of immigration reform.

Noting that the “immigration issue may be preventing some church leaders from siding with Donald Trump,” she wrote that it “is the time for church leaders to listen to their own flock on the important issue of immigration.”

Faith leaders, she said, need to recognize that the “amount of immigration allowed by a nation is a political matter, not a religious one” and that they cannot hold out for an ideal candidate because “Jesus will not be on the ballot.”

Touting the rise of a far-right party in Austria, Schlafly said conservatives who have religious reasons for supporting immigration reform should instead get with Trump’s anti-immigrant message because it has proven to be more politically popular.

“No church would urge people to unlock their doors at night in order to allow anyone in, and we should not persist with open borders to welcome hordes of illegal aliens who include many hardened criminals,” she wrote. “When an unwelcome ‘neighbor’ comes into our home, we ‘deport’ him out of our house, and Trump’s leadership on the immigration issue has earned him the support of millions of Democrats and Republicans alike. Loving our neighbor does not mean unlocking our doors to any and all comers.”

The immigration issue may be preventing some church leaders from siding with Donald Trump now. While opposition to Trump is expressed in moral terms – even though they had no trouble supporting the divorced Ronald Reagan in 1980 – a real motivation is that church leaders do not want Trump’s criticism of immigration.



Rev. Luis Cortes, as president of an Hispanic Christian network and nonprofit legal organization that helps immigrants, declared after the White House meeting that “the entire religious community” supports an Obama-style immigration reform package. “For the first time … all the major denominations and churches and religious bodies of this country believe that it is a moral imperative that we get immigration reform done,” he asserted.

But churchgoing voters indicated otherwise during the Republican primaries, by nominating Donald Trump. Now is the time for church leaders to listen to their own flock on the important issue of immigration.

The amount of immigration allowed by a nation is a political matter, not a religious one, and this issue has become the elephant in the room impossible to overlook. The stunning election results in Austria two weeks ago demonstrate that those who try to duck or downplay the immigration issue are headed for defeat.

As in the United States, the leaders of both major political parties in Austria ignored the problems caused by immigration. A candidate emerged there named Norbert Hofer, who campaigned on “putting Austria first” despite the media giving him little chance of winning.

On April 24 Austrians voted with a large turnout, and the candidate opposed to permissive immigration won the first round in a stunning double-digit landslide. The two major parties that had echoed failed immigration policies, as Democrats and Republicans here have done, fared so poorly that they failed even to qualify for the upcoming runoff, which the Trump-like Austrian candidate is also expected to win.

Church leaders should recognize that responsibility is just as important as charity. No church would urge people to unlock their doors at night in order to allow anyone in, and we should not persist with open borders to welcome hordes of illegal aliens who include many hardened criminals.

When an unwelcome “neighbor” comes into our home, we “deport” him out of our house, and Trump’s leadership on the immigration issue has earned him the support of millions of Democrats and Republicans alike. Loving our neighbor does not mean unlocking our doors to any and all comers.

There will not be a third-party candidate who is as good as Trump on immigration. There will be only two viable candidates to choose from this fall, only one of whom will safeguard our country against immigration – and Jesus will not be on the ballot.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 5/3/16

  • Phyllis Schlafly insists that ex-felons should never be allowed to regain the right to vote: "We do not want convicted murderers and rapists sitting on juries in criminal trials, and we do not want convicted felons to be picking the next leaders of our nation. Elections are for law-abiding citizens to pick law-abiding leaders, not for criminals to elect fellow criminals."
  • Peter LaBarbera informs Target that "my family and I are joining the Target boycott and will no longer shop at your stores."
  • Don Boys says that Target must not just be boycotted, but completely destroyed: "Target must be destroyed, not just boycotted and humbled into submission regarding their love affair with the LGBT crowd ... When Target goes belly up, it will send a loud message to other businesses that it is not wise to use perversion to antagonize principled people."
  • Pamela Geller and Robert Spencer were not amused by an Aasif Mandvi joke.
  • Tony Perkins says that "the Left is never going to be satisfied if faith-based groups can contract with the government at all! They want to squeeze Christians out of government at the same time as they're forcing them out of the marketplace, Public Square, and schools."
  • Finally, Bill Kristol explains that #NeverTrump apparently doesn't actually mean "never Trump."

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 4/28/16

  • Phyllis Schlafly is totally unconcerned about Donald Trump's position on abortion because "the grassroots is not looking to Trump for their guidance for a lot of these moral issues."
  • Bobby Knight has endorsed Trump because Trump is "the most prepared man in history to step in as president of the United States."
  • Conversely, Ted Cruz supporter Ken Cuccinelli says that Trump is "the biggest whiner in American political history."
  • The National Organization for Marriage is vowing to defeat three Missouri lawmakers who voted against an anti-LGBT bill: "This act of betrayal by three cowardly Republicans will not be tolerated."
  • Finally, MRC's Dylan Gwinn goes after ABC's television program "Blackish" for apparently suggesting that white people are racist ... or something: "Is that why so many white people vote to have their money taken away from them by the government, and spent on often-useless and wasteful, but well-meaning government programs to improve health care and education in black neighborhoods?"

Trump Supporter Phyllis Schlafly Calls Out Ted Cruz For Lifting Her 'Choice Not An Echo' Line

In his speech yesterday announcing Carly Fiorina as his vice presidential running mate, Ted Cruz said that his campaign presents Republican voters with “a choice, not an echo,” a line he lifted directly from legendary conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, who happens to be a prominent supporter of his GOP rival Donald Trump.

Schlafly, who is locked in a bitter war for control of her organization, Eagle Forum — a fight motivated in part by a split between Trump and Cruz supporters in the organization — told WorldNetDaily today that she didn’t like Cruz using her famous line.

“That’s my phrase, and Ted Cruz knows it,” Schlafly said. “But as far as I’m concerned, ‘a choice not an echo’ this year applies to Donald Trump, not Ted Cruz.”

In his Wednesday speech announcing Carly Fiorina would be his vice presidential candidate if he becomes the GOP nominee, Cruz said the American people wanted a president who could present “a choice, not an echo” in public policy.

The reference clearly was to Schlafly’s seminal 1964 book, “A Choice Not an Echo,” written to support the presidential candidacy of Sen. Barry Goldwater. “That’s my phrase, and Ted Cruz knows it,” Schlafly told WND. “But as far as I’m concerned, ‘a choice not an echo’ this year applies to Donald Trump, not Ted Cruz. Trump is the only one in the Republican Party who can take on the king-makers in the GOP leadership establishment.”

Schlafly is currently fighting a court battle with a group of dissidents on Eagle Forum’s board, led by her daughter, Anne Cori, whom she claims are trying to remove her from the organization she founded.

Cori and five other board members announced earlier this month that they had ousted Schlafly’s handpicked successor, Ed Martin, from his position leading the organization’s political wing. Martin, however, says that Schlafly was the real target of the coup, claiming that the dissidents — mostly Cruz supporters — are furious that Schlafly endorsed Trump.

Schlafly is upset that members of the dissident group delivered an endorsement of Cruz “in a way that made it look like it was Eagle Forum doing it” and gave Eagle Forum membership lists to the Cruz campaign.

Cori and her allies have filed a lawsuit against Martin and John Schlafly, Schlafly’s son and Cori’s brother, in order to gain control of Eagle Forum’s political division, insisting that a majority of board members have voted to remove Martin from his post.

The lawsuit alleges that Martin has been “posting on Facebook as Phyllis Schlafly” and “personally authored content which he has nonetheless styled as information from Phylis Schlafly.”

“John Schlafly denied Anne Schlafly Cori access to the Illinois Headquarters and prevented her from obtaining or inspecting Eagle Forum Property,” the suit continues. “When Anne Schlafly Cori insisted on her right to obtain and inspect Eagle Forum property, the Alton Police were called to remove Anne Schlafly Cori from the Illinois Headquarters.”

Meanwhile, Martin told WorldNetDaily that Cori and others did not show up to court, unlike “the iron lady” Schlafly.

“The iron lady of Eagle Forum sat there in the courtroom from 1:30 p.m. until 5 o’clock, as a thunderstorm went through, the power went out briefly; and the elevator in the building didn’t work when the hearing ended,” Martin said. “Phyllis walked down the stairs with the rest of us. Meanwhile, none of the six opposition board members showed up; only their three high-powered lawyers.”

He also said that Cori gave leaked Eagle Forum membership information to the Cruz campaign and that the senator’s campaign tried to contact the group’s South Dakota leader, Kitty Werthmann, to seek a personal endorsement.

The defendants’ attorneys further said that since January 2016, the plaintiffs “have endorsed and have sought to get other persons affiliated with Eagle Forum to endorse Ted Cruz in a letter that misleadingly suggests that Eagle Forum as an organization endorses Senator Cruz.”

Further, they alleged the six board members misappropriated Eagle Forum membership lists as well as contact information for leaders, volunteers and other followers in direct violation of an Eagle Forum policy that prohibits providing such lists to political campaigns.

According to affidavits submitted by the defendants, Cori allegedly handed over the Eagle Forum membership and leaders lists to the Cruz campaign, which used them to make marketing calls.

Martin, in his affidavit, noted Kitty Werthmann, the Eagle Forum state leader for South Dakota, made him aware that the Cruz campaign was contacting her by telephone, soliciting her personal information and endorsement, and urging Eagle Forum to endorse Cruz for president.

“Ms. Werthmann provided me the number from which the call had been made,” Martin said. “I then looked up that phone number and determined that it was registered to a company with the Cruz campaign.”

Tracing the information back through the Eagle Forum organization, Martin determined a contractor to the Eagle Forum Education Fund, who was a part-time employee of Cruz’s presidential campaign, had requested and obtained the Eagle Forum lists from Eagle Forum staff, following instructions by Anne Cori.

Jeff Roe, Cruz’s campaign manager, did not respond to a WND email request for comment.

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/25/16

Phyllis Schlafly Almost Picked Michele Bachmann To Succeed Her 'But She Knew Nothing About Politics Outside Of Her Own Domain'

Conservative icon Phyllis Schlafly offered more details about the turmoil within her organization, Eagle Forum, in an interview with far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones yesterday, claiming that the group of dissidents who she says are trying to oust her from her position in the group are also targeting her son and disclosing that she once considered former Rep. Michele Bachmann to be a potential successor before deciding against it.

Schlafly’s handpicked successor, Ed Martin, was recently voted out by a group of Eagle Forum board members who suggested that he was mismanaging the organization and manipulating the 91-year-old Schlafly into making unwise decisions, such as her very public endorsement of Donald Trump.

The group voted to install Schlafly’s daughter, Anne Cori, as the organization’s new executive director, and insists that removing Martin, not Schlafly, is their only objective.

Schlafly, however, believes that the board vote was invalid and actually directed at ousting her, claiming that the dissidents, including her daughter, are targeting her because she didn’t join them in supporting Ted Cruz.

She gave more information to Jones yesterday, alleging that Cori was “at one time” in line to succeed her at Eagle Forum but that she decided against naming her daughter to lead the group, a move which may have helped to motivate Cori to launch the supposed coup.

Bachmann, Schlafly revealed, was also floated as a potential successor, but the former Minnesota congresswoman was taken out of the running due to concerns about her experience and the breadth of her knowledge.

“A lot of our people wanted us to pick Michele Bachmann, and she certainly has a lot of talent, a very fine speaker, and so forth,” she said, “but she knew nothing about running an organization and she knew nothing about politics outside of her own domain.”

Schlafly says her daughter “lined up with some of the people who thought they could get good jobs at Eagle Forum if they got rid of me” and that Cori “is trying to tell me that she’s just doing this for my benefit, but I don’t need somebody to do something for my benefit, I’ve gotten along quite well all these years.”

Schlafly said that the turmoil started when the Eagle Forum leaders who endorsed Cruz “did it in a way that made it look like it was Eagle Forum doing it” and leaked membership lists to the Cruz campaign. She alleged that Cori and others are now also trying to remove her sons, John and Andy, from their posts in the organization.

“The only thing they’ve done is divide my family,” she said. “My daughter is with the group that is leading the assault on my leadership and they want to get rid of my son, so extremely valuable in my organization, one of them is both a lawyer and an accountant and he’s very good with the money, he always errs on the safe side of things ... Then we’ve got another son they want to get rid of and he’s the one who has written a lot of these amicus briefs that we’ve filed with the Supreme Court in important cases.”

“I represent Eagle Forum and they tried to throw me out but, at any rate, I’m still here,” she said.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 4/19/16

  • Some sober analysis from Michele Bachmann: "The Muslim Brotherhood together with its myriad fake front groups, like a demon, first charms then disarms, then contorts itself into a seemingly friendly face. Once it’s beguiled its unsuspecting victim, it mercilessly unleashes death and destruction upon its unwary victims, like a viper."
  • William Gheen says the outcome of the immigration case at SCOTUS will determine "whether we continue this country as a functioning republic or as a totalitarian dictatorship."
  • The National Organization for Marriage calls upon supporters to "Demand that Congress Get Off Its Rear and Prohibit Government Discrimination Against People of Faith."
  • Paul Hair tells his fellow right-wing Christians that Hollywood hates them and everything they represent.
  • Finally, Phyllis Schlafly has released a video informing Eagle Forum members that she remains in control of the organization.

Maddow: Donald Trump Is 'Blowing Up' Conservative Movement

Last night, Rachel Maddow reminded us of how Phyllis Schlafly helped transform the GOP into the far-right party that it is today, dating back to her efforts to help Barry Goldwater win the 1964 Republican nomination.

The GOP found Goldwater’s ultraconservativism much more acceptable than Nelson Rockefeller’s divorce and remarriage, even though Goldwater’s views set him up for a landslide loss in November. Now, Schlafly is getting behind Donald Trump, a reality TV star notorious for his divorces and extramarital affairs.

Schlafly called her pro-Goldwater treatise, “A Choice Not An Echo,” which Maddow described as “a clarion call-to-arms from the social conservative wing of the Republican Party.” She now hails Trump as “the candidate who will give us ‘a choice not an echo.’”

Maddow noted that Schlafly’s group, Eagle Forum, “played a central role in defining social conservatism —anti-gay, anti-feminist, anti-abortion politics — and putting them right at the heart of the Republican Party and its platform,” including at the 1992 Republican National Convention. That convention became notorious for the social conservative red meat thrown by the likes of Pat Robertson and Pat Buchanan, who used the platform to deliver his polarizing “Culture War” speech.

Ever since, Maddow explained, Schlafly has successfully push backed against “moderating influences to make sure the Republican Party never gets any less conservative on issues like homosexuality, abortion and feminism.”

But Schlafly may now be a victim of her own success.

After Schlafly succeeded in her effort to install right-wing purity tests and ideological rigidness within the conservative movement, Eagle Forum leaders who have supported Ted Cruz are reportedly rebelling over her support for Trump, who they say isn’t conservative enough.

“Phyllis Schlafly and her organization have been at the heart of the conservative movement inside the Republican Party for over 40 years and something is happening now to blow it up,” Maddow said. “Right now, finally, with Phyllis Schlafly at age 91, after everything she’s been through, it appears to be finally blowing up because of Donald Trump.”

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