Outsourcing

PFAW’s Latino Vote Program: Spanish-Language Radio Ad Challenges Perdue in Georgia

People For the American Way today launched its second Spanish-language radio ad of the cycle, challenging Georgia Senate candidate David Perdue and his extreme stances on jobs, workers’ rights, and immigration. The ad will air starting today in Atlanta. (An English translation of the ad is available below. You can hear an English version of the ad here.)

“David Perdue has an extreme agenda and he’s way out of step with Georgia’s Latino voters,” said Randy Borntrager of People For the American Way. “As a private citizen, he demanded profits at the expense of American workers. Now, as a Senate candidate, he wants to maintain low wages, outsource jobs, hand out tax breaks to corporations, and continue to ignore our broken immigration system. These are the real issues at stake in this election. This is why Latino voters deserve to know about Perdue’s twisted priorities when going into the voting booth this fall.”

This ad is the latest in PFAW’s campaign to highlight the extreme views of GOP candidates to Latino voters in key states. Georgia’s Latino population has grown rapidly in recent years, increasing by more than 110% since 2000. Latinos now represent more than 9% of the state’s population.

“Latino voters hold a tremendous amount of power in this election,” said Borntrager. “We’re making sure that this critical community understands what’s at stake in 2014 and that the Latino voice is heard loud and clear on Election Day.”

This is the second ad of the election in PFAW’s multi-state Spanish language campaign. Early this cycle, PFAW launched an ad challenging North Carolina senate candidate Thom Tillis on his own extreme views.

The script of the ad reads:

RODRIGO: Mientras más conozco del republicano David Perdue más miedo me da y más me doy cuenta que debemos unirnos en nuestro voto contra él este noviembre.
Desde que estaba en el sector privado, el republicano Perdue ha explotado a los trabajadores.
¡Y ahora como candidato al senado quiere seguir con lo mismo: quiere dejar que las empresas manden trabajos al extranjero, donde pagan sueldos tan bajos que son ridículos!
¡Aquí, se opone al aumento del salario mínimo pero está de acuerdo en subirle los impuestos a los trabajadores!
¿Y saben qué dice de la reforma migratoria? Que es una pérdida de tiempo.
¡El republicano David Perdue no lucha por los trabajadores y no luchará por nosotros!
¡Por eso tenemos que unirnos y defender nuestros trabajos, nuestra comunidad, y votar en contra de David Perdue y los republicanos!

VO DISCLAIMER:
Este mensaje es pagado por People For the American Way, (www.pfaw.org) y no está autorizado por ningún candidato o comité de candidato. People For the American Way es responsable por el contenido de este anuncio.

In English:

RODRIGO: The more I learn about Republican David Perdue the more scared I am and the more I realize that we need to be united on our vote against him this coming November.
Since working in the private sector, David Perdue has been exploiting workers.
And now as a candidate to the Senate, he wants to do the same: He wants to allow companies to send jobs abroad, where they pay salaries so low, they are ridiculous!
Here, he opposes an increase to the minimum wage but he agrees to raise taxes for workers!
And do you know what he says about immigration reform? That it's a waste of time.
The Republican David Perdue does not fight for workers and won’t fight for us!
That's why we have to unite and defend our jobs, our community, and vote against David Perdue and the Republicans!

VO DISCLAIMER:
Paid for by People For the American Way (www.pfaw.org) and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee. People For the American Way is responsible for the content of this advertising.

PFAW, a national group protecting civil rights and civil liberties, has worked in multiple local, state, and federal campaigns to engage Latino voters.

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Public Turning Against the Private Prison Racket

PFAW’s 2012 report, “Predatory Privatization: Exploiting Financial Hardship, Enriching the One Percent, Undermining Democracy,” included a section titled, “The Pernicious Private Prison Industry.” We reported that across the country, private prisons were often violent, poorly run facilities that put prisoners, employees and communities at risk even while failing to deliver on promised savings to taxpayers. But state legislators, encouraged by ALEC and by private prison interests’ lobbying and campaign expenditures, continued to turn prisons over to private corporations, often with contract provisions that acted as incentives for mass incarceration.

A new story in Politico Magazine, “The Private Prison Racket” comes to the same conclusions. “Companies that manage prisons on our behalf have abysmal records,” says author Matt Stroud. “So why do we keep giving them our business?”

The Politico story slams “bed mandates” – guarantees given by states to private companies to keep prisons full.  Contracts like that build in incentives for governments to lock people up – and punish states financially when they try to reduce prison populations.

Politicians are taking notice. Last month, In the Public Interest reported that reality has turned the tide against private prisons: “Coast-to-coast, governments are realizing that outsourcing corrections to for-profit corporations is a bad deal for taxpayers, and for public safety.” The dispatch cited problems with private prisons in states as diverse as Arizona, Vermont, Texas, Florida, and Idaho, where Gov. Butch Otter, a “small government” conservative, announced last month that the state would take control of the Idaho Correctional Center back from private prison giant Corrections Corporation of America due to rampant violence, understaffing, gang activity, and contract fraud.

But the huge private prison industry is not going away anytime soon. As In the Public Interest notes:

All of this momentum does not suggest the imminent death of the for-profit prison industry. Some states, including California and West Virginia, are currently gearing up to send millions more to these companies. But the past year has been a watershed moment, and we are heading in the right direction. In light of these developments, these states would be wise to look to sentencing reform to reduce populations, rather than signing reckless outsourcing contracts.

The arguments against private prisons are myriad and compelling. Promised savings end up as increased costs. Lockup quotas force taxpayers to guarantee profits for prison companies through lock up quotas hidden in contracts. They incentivize mass incarceration while discouraging sentencing reform in an era when crime rates are plummeting.

But more than anything else, the reality of the disastrous private prison experiment has turned the public against the industry.

 

PFAW
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