police brutality

Jim Bakker Says Black Lives Matter Protesters Are 'Little Kids'

On his show today, televangelist Jim Bakker claimed that most Black Lives Matter protestors are “little kids” who should not be listened to, blaming President Obama for “allowing these riots to get out of hand.”

“Did you ever look at the people marching?” Bakker asked. “Most of them are kids. And you want some kid, 10-, 11-, 12-year old running your country? You know, I mean, it’s beyond comprehension and I say again, I blame our leadership for allowing these riots to get out of hand. It’s no sense in it.”

Bakker continued, “If you’ve got a big convention of thousands of people coming to have a Republican or Democratic convention, we have no obligation to let them take over and riot in the streets. We need a president that will say, ‘No more, we’re not gonna do it.’ Why let these little kids  they don’t even know, we used to say they’re not even dry behind the ears, you understand what that means? And yet we let it go on.”

Ann Coulter: At Least Jim Crow-Era Schools Didn't Teach 'On How Bad Black People Are'

On “The Eric Metaxas Show” yesterday, Ann Coulter criticized public schools for supposedly “teaching classes to white children on how bad white people are,” while insisting that segregated schools during Jim Crow “were not teaching classes in the white schools on how bad black people are.”

“[America] is the last Christian country on earth, it is one of the least sinning countries and far more sinned against, and all we do is wallow in every tiny little thing, not we, but you know, it’s forced on us from every media outlet,” Coulter said. “‘Oh, let’s talk about the bad things.’ I mean, you see the analogy with what’s done to policemen in America, keeping us safe, risking their lives, risking their lives to keep people who hate their guts safe, and 99 percent of them are fabulous and unbelievable. I would say it’s less than one percent, and all we have to hear about is, ‘Oh that one percent, and yes, there are some bad apples.’ Why don’t we say that about any other profession? How about hedge fund managers? How about campaign consultants? Any bad apples in there? How about newspaper editors?”

Coulter continued, “With them, it would be shocking to even begin a sentence with, ‘Well, there are some bad apples.’ It’s the same thing with America. We have, you know, the most magnificent country, should be fighting to protect it and instead, I mean, look at these course curriculums.”

“Even, you know, in the worst days of Jim Crow, when – true, black people could not go to school with white people because of the Democrats, but in the worst days, they were not teaching classes in the white schools on how bad black people are,” Coulter said. “Today, right here, within a half mile of where this studio is, they are teaching classes to white children on how bad white people are.”

Metaxas said, “This started in the ‘60s, and basically, we have been teaching young people – we’ve not been teaching them about the greatness of America and the heroes of America, the people who have died for liberty. And we have not been teaching that.” He accused universities of “teaching against the greatness of America.”

PFAW’s Diallo Brooks Discusses Michael Brown Shooting on BET

Today People For the American Way Director of Outreach and Public Engagement Diallo Brooks was featured in a powerful BET segment on the fatal shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

In the interview, Brooks situates Brown’s death within the larger context of police harassment of and violence toward African American men. “We’ve learned that history continues to repeat itself — that we haven’t healed the old wounds that exist in this country,” Brooks says.

Brooks also underscores the importance of voter engagement in local elections for addressing these issues: “We need to really step up and demand our law enforcement to look like us and to represent us, to be a part of us — to be a part of the fabric of the community.”

Watch the full interview below:


PFAW Foundation YEOs & YP4 Alum Unite with Missouri Protesters to Demand Accountability

Protesters throughout the nation have come out to march and peacefully protest the unjust criminal system that led to Michael Brown being gunned down in Missouri on August 9, including members of the People For the American Way Foundation family.

In Missouri, two members of PFAW Foundation’s Young Elected Officials Network have taken key roles speaking out for justice. State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Alderman Antonio French were both part of the protests in Ferguson; Chappelle-Nadal was tear-gassed, and French was arrested. Other members of the YEO Network have also been organizing national petitions, marching, buying food and water for protestors, trying to dissuade looting, among other things.

Chappelle-Nadal, elected in 2010, represents part of St. Louis County in the Missouri Senate. She has been vocal in her criticism of Missouri Governor Jay Nixon and his response to the crisis in her community.

“I never expected to represent a war zone,” she tweeted Thursday.

French, on the other hand, has been documenting the protests through “advocacy journalism.” Born and raised in O’Fallon, French has dedicated his time in public service to improving the quality of life in north St. Louis, often working in conjunction with police to create safer spaces.

During the protests last Wednesday, French was arrested and then released early Thursday, but the reason behind the arrest remained unclear. His arrest, along with his work documenting the protests, have made him a “national voice against the militarization of police.”

In Miami, another PFAW Foundation voice joined the protests. Young People For alum Phillip Agnew, founder of the Dream Defenders, organized a similar demonstration to protest how “police departments around the country will continue to use black and brown bodies for target practice.”

Many Americans are appalled at the actions taken by law enforcement officials in Ferguson, Missouri this month. PFAW Foundation is proud of the work being done by members of our leadership networks to build a more equal America.

PFAW Foundation

Ferguson and the America We Need to Build

This post was originally published at the Huffington Post.

An unarmed teenager gunned down in the street. Peaceful protesters attacked in a military-style assault. Journalists tear-gassed and arrested to prevent them from covering the actions of government officials. This is not the America to which we aspire.

Many Americans are both angry and appalled at the actions taken by law enforcement officials in Ferguson, Missouri, this week. These actions do not reflect a commitment to the Constitution or to the principles of equal justice under the law and freedom of the press. We applaud the Department of Justice for undertaking an investigation into the violence, and we are grateful that state officials have stepped in to institute a more sensible law enforcement presence. We encourage state and federal officials to continue monitoring the situation and to intervene as necessary to prevent further civil rights violations.

At the center of this controversy is a dead teenager and a grieving family. We recognize that the pain and outrage felt by so many people is grounded in the fact that this kind of killing of young men of color happens far too often. Part of the tragedy is that a killing like this is not surprising. If our commitment to equality and human dignity is to have real meaning, we cannot continue to tolerate conditions that require so many parents to teach their children how to live through a chance encounter with law enforcement.

In the long run, our elected officials must grapple with many complex policy questions, including racial disparities in the administration of justice. Today we support community leaders who are demanding accountability.

PFAW Foundation
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