Science

Joyner: Science Proves God Created The Universe At The Big Bang When He Said 'Let There Be Light'

While preaching at his MorningStar Fellowship Church last week, Rick Joyner revealed that he spends hours every week studying science, which has led him to conclude that science has proven that God created the universe at the Big Bang when He said "let there be light."

"The Big Bang Theory did confirm," Joyner explained, "there was a point of creation. There was a nanosecond where nothing existed in the physical universe and a nanosecond later, all of the matter and all of the energy in the universe now was there instantly. And this has been pretty much a theory confirmed that everything came in one burst, at one time, and it was when God said 'let there be light'":

Wiles And Son: Pat Robertson Attacked Young Earth Creationism Because He Wants To Fit In

On yesterday's TruNews radio program, End Times broadcaster Rick Wiles brought his son Jeremy on to push back against Pat Robertson's recent assertion that Young Earth Creationism is "a joke."

As Jeremy Wiles explained, we could not possibly know that the earth is billions of years old because Noah's flood would have washed away all the evidence. Thus, the reason that Robertson is making this claim, Wiles asserted, is because "he doesn't want to feel like an outcast" and is trying to make the Bible fit in with the secular scientific worldview.

But that is a losing strategy, he explained, because history has always shown that the Bible is one hundred percent scientifically accurate, which is why Christians have always known that the earth is round while it was the scientists who believed that the world was flat:

Jeremy Wiles: I think Pat is trying to fit the Bible into modern scientific  thinking. I really think that he feels the pressure from the scientific community, not so much because there's evidence to support billions of years but rather because he wants to conform to the idea so that he can have a more acceptable worldview. He doesn't want to feel like an outcast, but history has shown the Bible is scientifically accurate time and again. 

Scientists once thought the world was flat. Columbus faced opposition in his attempt to find a western route to Asia because people thought the earth was flat. But the Bible told us He sits enthroned above the circle of the earth. The Bible is teaching us the earth is a globe, it was round, it was a circle, a sphere.

Rick Wiles: And I think about Obama, when he wants to mock Christians or conservatives, he'll refer to them as the Flat Earth Society. But the Christians were not the ones who were saying the earth was flat, it was the scientists. The Christians knew the earth was round because they read the Bible and they believed the Bible.

For the record, the idea that most people believed the earth to be flat is a myth as "no educated person in the history of Western Civilization from the third century B.C. onward believed that the earth was flat."

Tell the Texas State Board of Education that science belongs in science textbooks, not religion.

Tell the TX State Board of Education: Creationism is religion and doesn't belong in a science textbook -- science does.

Fischer: It Is 'Ignorant, Ignorant, Ignorant' To Think Human Behavior Can Impact The Climate

As he does every day, Bryan Fischer began his radio program with a Bible reading and discussion, in this case, a passage from Psalm 135 which he cited not only as proof that God struck down the Native Americans so that the United States could be established by Christians, but also as proof that there is nothing that human beings can do to influence the climate.

Verse 7 of the Psalm declares that "He makes clouds rise from the ends of the earth; he sends lightning with the rain and brings out the wind from his storehouses."  As such, Fischer said, "that's why it is dumb, dumb, dumb; it is stupid, stupid, stupid; it is ignorant, ignorant, ignorant to think that there is anything that man can do to control the climate through human behavior."

"If you want to do something about the climate," Fischer said, "you want to do something about the weather, there is only one thing that we can do to affect climate or affect weather and that is to pray to Yahweh":

Barton: We Haven't Had Global Warming In Sixteen Years

As we noted several months ago, David Barton is now leading the fight about Common Core and, in that capacity, recently sat down for a discussion about it in Oklahoma where he made the standard, utterly unfounded claims about how Common Core would lead to the use of iris scanners on students who will be implanted with biometric tracking devices.

But it wasn't only where Common Core would lead that Barton was worried about, as he also warned that the content of the curriculum is heavily focused on indoctrinating students by teaching them about things like global warming.

Barton insisted that while global warming does occur, is it not man-made but rather happens naturally and is no different than normal temperature fluctuations.

"Global warming occurs," Barton stated, but "we haven't had it in sixteen years. But anthropogenic? That hasn't been proved at all, not by a long shot.  Anthropogenic means man-caused global warming.  I mean, we've got cycles, you bet.  That's why we have averages.  That's why in Texas we go from summers of 70 degrees to summers of a 120 degrees. I mean, it's averages":

Fischer: The Bible Mentions The Second Law Of Thermodynamics

Every once in a while, Bryan Fischer takes a break from attacking gays, and Muslims, and Mormons in order to impart a bit of biblically-sound scientific wisdom to his audience, like when he explained that only the Bible can provide accurate information regarding the age of the earth or how Jesus holds together the atomic nucleus.

On his broadcast today, Fischer once again put on his scientist cap to explain how the second law of thermodynamics, which he, for some reason, combined with the first law of thermodynamics and then proceeded to absurdly oversimplify, was first mentioned in the Bible; in Psalm 102, to be exact, which reads: 

In the beginning you laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

They will perish, but you remain; they will all wear out like a garment.

Like clothing you will change them and they will be discarded.

But you remain the same, and your years will never end.

As Fischer said, scientists could have figured all of this out if they had simply read this passage from the Book of Psalms, written in 900 BCE, several thousand years before it was formulated:

Fischer: Only Eyewitness Testimony Can Determine the Age of the Earth

We would like to thank Michael Hainey of GQ magazine for recently asking Sen. Marco Rubio about how old he believes the world to be, mainly because it has resulted in entertaining attempts to defend the young earth view, like this exchange between Bryan Fischer and Terry Mortenson from Answers In Genesis on yesterday's radio program when the two insisted that scientists can never determine the age of the earth because they weren't there and "the only way we can know the age of the earth is if we have eyewitness testimony of somebody who was there, and that's what we have in the Bible": 

Beck and Crew Try to Understand and Explain the Age of the Earth

Sen. Marco Rubio was recently asked by GQ magazine how old he believes the earth to be, which he refused to answer on the grounds that "I’m not a scientist, man."

While science says that the earth is around 4.5 billion years old, biblical literalists believe that the earth is only about six thousand years old; a figure which is calculated by "taking the first five days of creation (from earth’s creation to Adam), then following the genealogies from Adam to Abraham in Genesis 5 and 11, then adding in the time from Abraham to today."

Today on Glenn Beck's radio program, Beck and his co-hosts totally dismissed the entire question as totally meaningless because nobody cares and it doesn't matter ... while obviously having absolutely no idea as to how the biblical age is calculated as they wildly guess that it probably comes from the fact that God created the heavens and earth in six days and that each day for God equals one thousand years: 

Robertson: Scientists 'Can't Speculate about the Origins of Life'

Pat Robertson has long had a tense relationship with the scientific community, even going so far as to tell residents of a Pennsylvania town that in a school board election voted against supporters of teaching Intelligent Design that “if there is a disaster in your area don’t turn to God, you just rejected him from your city…I recommend they call on Charles Darwin, maybe he can help them.” Today on the 700 Club, the televangelist offered a confusing response to a question about the compatibility of science and religion, saying that the “trouble is where scientists speculate about theology and they don’t know what they’re talking about because they weren’t there.” Robertson maintained that scientists “can’t speculate about the origins of life because they weren’t there” but then claimed it is appropriate to believe a “geologist who tells you something existed 300 million years ago.”

Watch:

Robertson: God created the world; the laws of nature were created by God. True science tries to find out what God put in the world. The trouble is where scientists speculate about theology and they don’t know what they’re talking about because they weren’t there. They can’t speculate about the origins of life because they weren’t there. If they tell you observable phenomenon then we ought to believe them, and I tell you if you find a geologist who tells you something existed 300 million years ago then you better believe them because he knows what he’s talking about. We don’t want our religious theory go with flat earth.

Fischer: 'Evolution is Completely Irrational and Scientifically Bankrupt'

During yesterday's program when Bryan Fischer was warning that electing a "spiritually-compromised" Mormon like Mitt Romney would weaken and endanger America, he was restating his theory that liberals and the media are now going to start attacking Romney's faith, claiming that if the media thinks that the beliefs of Evangelicals are odd, then "what Mormons believe is in coo-coo land."

That somehow sent him off on a tangent about science, during which he declared that he didn't believe in global warming or evolution because he is "committed to science."  And since "evolution is completely irrational and scientifically bankrupt," the "most logical thing in the world" is to believe that God created the universe:

Sadly, Fischer never got around to explaining how the theory of evolution is even remotely related to the laws of thermodynamics or how the latter undermines the former, as he eventually got back and track and returned to his anti-Mormon diatribe.

Barton: Life Begins Before Conception

Earlier this week, Miranda wrote a post about the Religious Right's anti-environmentalism and its relationship to Rick Santorum's recent attack on President Obama's "phony theology."

In the post, she noted that David Barton, of all people, is considered to be an expert on the topic of global warming by Republicans and the Religious Right and that, back in 2007, he even testified before the US Senate on the topic.

A few weeks after delivering that testimony, Barton gave a presentation on the subject of global warming which Wallbuilders recorded and now sells as a CD entitled "Science, The Bible, & Global Warming."

We listened to the presentation yesterday and it was chock-full of the sort of pseudo-science that one would expect from a pseudo-historian like David Barton, as his entire presentation was rooted in the idea that there is science and then there is "false science" ... and "false science" is anything that undermines the Bible:

There is science and there is science that is falsely so-called. See, the Bible doesn't have trouble with science, but it's talking about beware of the stuff that's falsely called science. There's a lot that masquerades in the name of science.

How do you know false science? False science leads you to a certain end. What is that end? That it undermines your faith. So a good definition of false science, at least based on the Bible verse, science that undermines faith is false science and science that's wrongly used it false science.

God's into science. He created everything. He's the great botanist, He's the great zoologist, He's the great every one of those things. He knows better than anyone else because he made it all. But when science takes you to a position that causes you to doubt your relationship with God, causes you to doubt the Bible ... that's called false science.

And since all "real" science has to correspond to the Bible, Barton explains that life does not begin at conception, but rather before conception ... because that is what the Bible says:

If you consider that life begins at conception ... and I have to consider that Biblically, life begins before conception because it says "before you were in your mother's womb I knew you." So I gotta say, well it at least begins at conception. How you handle that Jeremiah verse that says before that I knew you, you know that's an interesting question.

Defending Science Education in Your Community

Is there an effort in your state, locality or neighborhood school to introduce creationism or sideline evolution in the science classroom? If so, this toolkit was made for you. Parent and student versions available.

A Student of Uncommon Courage: Matthew LaClair

When Matthew LaClair heard his popular high-school history teacher tell students that only Christians will go to heaven, and that evolution has no basis in science, he knew something was wrong. Unlike most 16-year-olds, he knew it was his duty to do something about it.

Timeline: How Creationism Has "Evolved"

An overview of how the strategies of the creationism movement have "evoloved" over time.
Share this page: Facebook Twitter Digg SU Digg Delicious