Fighting the Right

Peter LaBarbera: Science Proves 'That Homosexuality Is As Bad As God Said It Was'

Anti-LGBT activist Mike Heath of MaineResistance recently interviewed Peter LaBarbera of Americans for Truth About Homosexuality regarding what he considered to be the failure of the Religious Right movement to go on offense against the LGBT rights movement.

LaBarbera said that while groups like the Family Research Council and the American Family Association are committed to resisting LGBT rights measures when they are proposed, they are far less willing to go on the offensive in order to actually reverse the gains that the LGBT community has made in recent years.

This position makes no sense, LaBarbera said, because anti-gay activists have God and truth on their side.

"That's the shame of our movement," he said. "The homosexual activists behave as if they have the truth. We act as if we're ashamed of the truth when, in reality, we have the truth. Look at homosexuality; God says it's an abomination. Well, what a shocker that the behavior that God says is an abomination is vastly disproportionately represented among sexually transmitted diseases. Gee, Mike, what a shocker!"

Saying that syphilis cases are surging because of gay men, LaBarbera declared that "what we're finding in the science is that homosexuality is as bad as God said it was and you can't change that."

Ginni Thomas And Jesse Lee Peterson Discuss 'Evil' Black Lives Matter, 'Illusion' Of Racism

Ginni Thomas, a Tea Party activist and the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, hosts a regular feature for the Daily Caller in which she interviews conservative figures about the news of the day. In an episode posted on Saturday, Thomas interviewed far-right activist and radio host Jesse Lee Peterson about what she called the “race hustlers” who are “in the business of keeping blacks angry” and Black Lives Matter, which Peterson called “evil,” “wicked,” and “worse than the KKK.”

“Who are the race hustlers?” Thomas asked. “Who’s in the business of keeping blacks angry?”

“The race hustlers,” Peterson replied, “are people like Jesse Jackson, the NAACP, the Congressional Black Caucus, Louis Farrakhan—the so-called civil rights leaders—many of the black preachers, Barack Obama, they’re all into keeping black Americans angry and demoralized for power and wealth for themselves. And you have to demoralize a person or a people in order to control them, you cannot control a moral people so they keep them in a state of anger and confusion so that they can use them for their personal gain.”

Peterson then told Thomas about his theory that he explains in a recent book positing that because President Obama “grew up without a father in the home,” he only feels “anger” and not “love,” and that’s why he’s sympathetic to Black Lives Matter.

“Those people are evil, they’re wicked, they’re an agitating group, they’re worse than the KKK,” he said. “If Black Lives Matter was a white organization and doing exactly what they’re doing now, America would not accept them, they would not. But because they are black and white people are afraid, and then they have the support of the president, they’re allowed to bring on destruction in this country.”

Claiming that Obama sees the killing of police officers as “no big deal,” Peterson went on to repeat his exhortation to white people to “stand up for themselves” against the Black Lives Matter movement.

“There’s no such thing as racism,” he concluded. “It doesn’t exist. It’s an illusion. It has been made up by the race hustlers in order to intimidate and control to get that power.”

View the full interview at the Daily Caller.

Trump To Attend Ohio Pastors' Meeting Hosted By Tsunami-Stopping Prophet

Back in May, we reported that Ohio pastor Frank Amedia was serving as a volunteer “liaison for Christian policy” for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, setting up meetings for the candidate with conservative religious figures. Amedia, as we noted at the time, is part of a controversial movement of self-proclaimed “prophets” and once claimed to have single-handedly stopped a tsunami from hitting Hawaii.

On Wednesday, Amedia will be co-hosting an event in Columbus in which Trump will meet with pastors in an “intimate setting.”

Amedia sent out an invitation to the September 21 event on Saturday, writing, “I am honored to co-host with Rev. Darrell Scott this important convocation of Pastors and Leaders in Columbus, Ohio on Wednesday, September 21 to meet with Donald Trump in an intimate setting. I am extending an invitation to you and your pastors and leaders to be our special guests.”

According to the invitation circulated by Amedia, the event’s primary host will be pro-Trump Cleveland pastor Darrell Scott and will also feature Michael Cohen, the head of Trump’s “National Diversity Coalition,” who told a reporter last year that spousal rape doesn’t exist.

Along with claiming to have stopped a tsunami from hitting Hawaii, Amedia has called AIDS “a disease that comes because of unnatural sex” that can be avoided by those who choose a “wholesome life” and said that he’s ready to be thrown into a furnace in protest of LGBT equality.

In June, Amedia insisted that Trump had been “raised up” by God to help pave the way for the Second Coming.

UPDATE: The meeting, which will be held at Scott’s church, will immediately precede a “town hall meeting on African-American concerns” that will be aired that evening by Fox News’ Sean Hannity.

Bryan Fischer: Only Those Who Believe In God And Oppose Abortion Are Qualified To Serve As Judges

American Family Radio host Bryan Fischer declared on his radio program on Friday that a person who does not believe in God or who supports abortion rights is unqualified to serve as a judge at any level in America.

Fischer got onto the subject after praising Donald Trump on his radio show for naming Marjorie Dannenfelser of the Susan B. Antony List as the head of his presidential campaign's pro-life coalition.

"I would submit to you that no man is qualified to sit as a judge in America who does not understand and believe that there is a Creator and that the Creator is the source of every single one of our fundamental, inalienable rights," Fischer said, "and that the first of these rights given to us by God is the right to life."

"No one is qualified to sit on any bench in the judiciary at any level, whether municipal or county or local or state or federal," he continued, "no man is qualified to sit on the bench who does not believe in a Creator, does not believe that the Creator is the source of all of our rights and does not believe that the very first of these rights, these legal rights, the constitutional rights, is the right to life."

Conservative Evangelicals Debate Whether Christians Should Support Trump

The National Religious Broadcasters sponsored a debate on Friday morning between two Never Trump evangelicals and two evangelical Trumpers. The event, held at the National Press Club, was emceed by NRB’s President and CEO Jerry Johnson, who called it a “family conversation.” Johnson, whose own inclinations seemed to rest with Trump’s advocates, was careful to say that NRB members are on both sides of the debate and the group itself does not support or oppose political candidates.

Representing the Never Trump position: pundit Erick Erickson and Bill Wichterman, who served in George W. Bush's White House. Arguing that evangelicals should rally around Trump were radio host Janet Parshall and anti-gay activist Bishop Harry Jackson. The event was structured with two rounds, starting with an Erickson v Parshall bout, followed by a Jackson v Wichterman match-up.

Erickson got the ball rolling saying he wouldn’t tell people not to vote for Trump, but he said that Christians with public platforms should not support Trump publicly “because I think it’s harmful for our witness.” When asked about Jesus, he said Clinton called Him her savior, and Trump gave vague and rambling responses.

Justifying support for Trump based on “values,” he said, runs up against the reality of Trump’s behavior as someone who “has bragged in his books about multiple affairs, including with married women, has cheated widows and single moms and the elderly out of money through Trump University, has stiffed the low-income worker on his buildings, telling them if they want to collect everything they’re owed they need to sue. Why do you go with him instead of her? Well, you say, ‘our values.’ How does he represent our values?...If you want to advocate for that, OK, but how are you advancing the kingdom of God?” Trump, he noted, says he’s a Christian but has repeatedly said he has never repented or asked for forgiveness.

To those who have suggested God could be using Trump like he used biblical figures like King Cyrus, Erickson said God had done that on His own and “has never asked His people to choose the evil.” Erickson said that he’s sure that there were some in Babylon saying “go on and bow, it’s just a statue,” but that the names we remember are those who resisted.

Parshall seemed a bit peeved about Erickson’s arguments. She talked about the supermajority support Trump is getting from conservative Christians and adopted evangelical pollster George Barna’s nomenclature for “SAGE Cons” – Spiritually Active Governance Engaged Conservatives. Trump’s support from that group, she said, has grown from 11 percent early in the year to 80 to 85 percent now.

“I’m interested in keeping the republic,” Parshall said. She dismissed the question of Trump’s character by saying that everybody is a sinner and “God has a track record of using flawed and broken people, even when it doesn’t look right to us.” She read a long list of moral failings by presidents throughout history, saying, “We are not electing a Messiah.” She did a similar litany with biblical figures, saying, “Noah was a drunk. Abraham lied. Jacob was a liar. Moses was a murderer. Samson was a womanizer. Rahab was a prostitute. Elijah was suicidal. Isaiah preached naked. Jonah ran from God. Job went bankrupt. Peter denied Christ.”

Parshall suggested that Trump’s victory over the huge field of Republican competitors was a sign of God’s favor: “For those who have been praying and fasting through, during and for this process, have we now believed the sovereignty of God didn’t apply? Did He take off to Philadelphia, as W.C. Fields said? Or was a God sovereign in this entire process? Can God raise up a leader who just doesn’t look right to us, but is exactly who God wants for such a time as this?”

During a Q&A session, Parshall said that evangelicals should look to Trump’s pick of Mike Pence, “who represents everything we evangelicals love and support,” as his running mate. Wichterman said that the vice president has as much power as the president wants him to have. Trump, he said, is not someone who surrounds himself with people who challenge his authority or is willing to hear from dissenting opinions. “I don’t have any confidence that Mike Pence, a good man, will be able to have that influence on Donald Trump,” he said.

In his response to Parshall, Erickson said essentially that yes, we are all sinners, but do we revel in our sin or repent of it? Are we to lower the bar or strive for something higher? Embracing Trump, he said, neither glorifies God nor advances the kingdom. Parshall responded that Christians have responsibilities on earth to be engaged culturally and politically. She said she doesn’t care that Hillary Clinton says Jesus is her savior if she also supports “the denigration of marriage” and the “annihilation of the pre-born.” She said she was interested in what a candidate will do for the country and “first, last, and always, what will you do with the court?” She said the difference between the judges Hillary Clinton would nominate and Trump’s list is “the difference between darkness and light.”

Harry Jackson started the second round, making the astonishing assertion that Trump “may be the only one who’s able to bring some substantive healing to the racial divide,” because, Jackson said, he could help the country by advancing “practical answers” on educational and economic opportunity.  Black and Hispanic voters, he said, have too often settled for “the politics of grievance.”

Jackson’s top three reasons for all Christians to vote for Trump were religious liberty, the Supreme Court, and support for Israel. He cited other reasons of particular interest to Black and Hispanic Christians to back Trump, including educational reform, economic development in urban areas, and family-oriented tax policies.

Trump isn’t perfect, Jackson said, but he’s getting better. Besides, he said, a little “organized and strategic chaos” might be just what the country needs to shake up the status quo of generational poverty and explosive racial tension. “We are at a place in our culture that the folks who control the system, their grasping little fingers need to be broken off the controls.”

Wichterman, a former special assistant to George W. Bush who now runs a ministry to congressional staff, established his conservative bona fides by saying that "you’ll have a hard time getting to my right. I’m a Republican because I’m a conservative, and a conservative because I’m a Christian. I believe conservative policies best reflect a Christian worldview.” Wichterman said he had been ready to support any of the other 16 Republican candidates, but is not willing to support Trump. Wichterman said he will vote for third-party candidate Evan McMullin.

Wichterman took on three of the arguments being used to justify evangelical support for Trump: Trump is the lesser of two evils; God uses bad people for good purposes; and Trump is a “good man”—a phrase Pence repeats over and over when talking about Trump.

Wichterman says the lesser of two evils argument is the most compelling. He said he has used it himself over the years, and understands that Trump is more likely to nominate conservative judges. But that’s not enough, he said, because Trump may actually be “a threat to our democratic republic”:

I care about the Supreme Court because I care deeply about the government handed down to us by the founders…Trump, on the other hand, has too often demonstrated contempt for the rule of law. He has sounded more like a strongman impatient with constitutional constraints. He advocates death to the innocent family members of terrorists…He advocates torture, not as a means of extracting important intelligence, but as a means of retribution. He said he would do a hell of a lot more than waterboarding.

Wichterman slammed Trump for praising dictators like Vladimir Putin – who is a strong leader in the same way arsenic is a strong drink – and the Chinese officials who Trump says showed “strength” by slaughtering peaceful protesters in Tiananmen Square. He cited examples of Trump encouraging violence against protesters. “Trump admires strength whatever form it takes,” he said, which is “inimical to the Gospel.”

Wichterman challenged people who say they won’t vote for Clinton because they believe she’s a liar, but will vote for Trump hoping that he’s been lying and doesn’t really mean what he says. Trump, he said, corrupts his supporters and corrupts “what it means to be a Republican.”

Regarding the argument that God uses bad people for good purposes, Wichterman said that doesn’t mean Christians are called to do bad so that good may result. “I’ve heard some evangelical leaders say we need a bad man to stand up to the bullying of the left…It’s almost as if we’re hiring a hitman to play dirty for the sake of good government,” which is an idea, he said, that “has nothing to do with our faith.”

Wichterman said the argument that Trump is a good man, a humble man, a truth-teller, “completely mystifies me.” He cited a litany of Trump outrages, including the implication that liberal judicial nominees should be assassinated and his reckless talk about rigged elections, which could be a set-up to civil strife. “If Trump is a good man, then I’ve got an entirely different definition of what ‘good’ is,” he said.

In his response, Jackson provided an example of the kind of double standard on truth that Wichterman had talked about. Jackson said Trump ran his primary like a “shock jock,” saying things to get attention, but that he is “growing.” Jackson said that people have been failed by both parties and that Trump can be a “change agent” who can move America forward by “pragmatically” addressing race and class issues.

In his response, Wichterman took on Jackson’s “shock jock” justification for Trump’s comments. What should concern us more, he asked, that Trump means the “profoundly destructive” things he says, or that he doesn't really mean them but says them to get some votes? He thinks Trump’s repeated expressions of admiration for Putin suggest that brute strength is “what he really appreciates and adores.”

He returned to his criticism of Trump’s support for dictators and his dog-whistle on “Second Amendment” responses to possible Clinton judicial nominees. “Is that the kind of society we want,” he asked, “where we’re killing one another over our disagreements?” Wichterman said it makes his blood boil when Trump talks about “knocking the crap out of” people. Trump, he said, is “profoundly reckless” with the rule of law, which is “a precious thing.”

When the NRB’s Johnson started a Q&A session, Parshall responded to Wichterman’s support for McMullin, who is a Mormon, by attacking Mormon theology and Mitt Romney:

What I want to know is why we didn’t have this discussion four years ago. We had a man from Massachusetts who was pro-abortion before he was pro-life, who was supporting Obamacare before he said he opposed it. But far more importantly, because this is an evangelical conversation, I love my friends who are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I’ve coalesced and worked with them on many an occasion. But this is an ecclesiastical conversation. That candidate wore underwear that he felt would protect him from harm, believed that Jesus was Satan’s spirit brother and believed that Jesus had returned already to the earth but only to the southern hemisphere. And yet we have a member of our panel who yet again is advocating another Mormon. If we’re going to have an ecclesiastical conversation about evangelicals, then let’s put doctrine on the table and see if that’s our driving factor.

In response to a later “lesser of two evils” question, Wichterman seemingly responded to Parshall’s attacks on Mormons by saying “I know many non-Christians who have wonderful character, and I know many Christians who have deplorable character.”

In response to a question about whether Trump’s comments about immigrants and others had been misinterpreted as “blanket statements,” Erickson said it is troubling that those in the alt-right who embrace a kind of white “tribalism” hear Donald Trump and think he is one of them. The campaign, he says, has made a mistake in “fostering those dog whistles for that group.”

Johnson asked Wichterman about a video created by Catholics for Trump meant to suggest that Trump’s much-criticized mocking of a disabled reporter might have been a more generic form of making fun of people. Even if you give Trump the benefit of the doubt in that specific instance, Wichterman said, Trump has a habit of “unapologetically” making fun of people for how they look, something Wichterman said is “corrosive to our national character” and “says something deeply wrong about the man’s character.”

In his closing remarks, Wichterman said people do not have to give into a binary choice. The founding fathers, he said, didn’t trust majorities, which is why they built in checks on power, including the electoral college. “I think we need to take seriously Trump’s words,” he said, “and we need to stop hoping that he’s just a huckster and a charlatan and just lying all the time.”

Down The Racist Rabbit Hole With Donald Trump

This piece originally appeared on the Huffington Post.

Today, Donald Trump pretended to end a lie and, in the process, told more lies.

After years of being a leading proponent of the racist “birther” movement, ignoring all actual evidence in order to raise questions about the first African-American president’s legitimacy, Trump today declared that he no longer believes that President Obama was born overseas.

First, Trump promised the press that he would address the birther issue in a press conference at his new hotel in Washington this morning. Then he made them sit through a parade of fawning endorsers before finally spending 30 seconds addressing his birtherism. Trump at last told the truth that Obama “was born in the United States, period.” But he couldn’t help packaging this rare truth with more lies, ludicrously, unbelievably claiming: “Hillary Clinton and her campaign of 2008 started the birther controversy. I finished it.”

Trump claims he “finished” the birther myth by causing President Obama to publicly release his long-form birth certificate in 2011, but he himself continued to enthusiastically promote the myth for years afterward, saying as recently as this January that he would write a very successful (of course) book on his “own theory” about the president’s birth.

And even if Trump had stopped being a birther in 2011, that doesn’t mean he could take credit for “finishing” a myth that he himself had helped create. Obama would never have had to go as far as to make his long-form birth certificate public if Trump hadn’t helped create an alternative universe dominated by the lie that the president’s citizenship was in doubt.

In fact, this is a pattern that Trump has followed many times.

Take Hillary Clinton’s recent bout of pneumonia. A reasonable reading of Clinton’s situation would be this: Clinton, a woman who is used to working long hours in demanding jobs, got sick and decided to power through that illness in order to get her work done.

But Trump and his allies had spent months building an alternative universe in which Clinton was hiding some sort of mysterious infirmity. In Trump World, that meant that Clinton was hiding some deep dark secret illness for nefarious reasons. When Clinton fell ill, the press held her to the standards of Trump World rather than the real world, portraying her as secretive and shady for failing to announce to the world that she had caught a common illness.

Trump has done the same thing with his lies about having opposed the Iraq War and his lies about his constantly changing position on the issue of abortion. He tells whatever version of events he thinks will be convenient at the time and everyone, including his fellow candidates, are suddenly supposed to live in whatever new reality he’s created.

Trump pretended that a racist conspiracy theory was true when it would help him get attention and win the support of the GOP’s fringe. Now he’s pretending that his hands are clean and that it was his opponent who was dredging up racist myths for the past five years. Trump wants us to accept whatever convenient new reality he’s concocted at any given time. The media has to stop being played by his rules.

PFAW

Donald Trump’s $14 Billion Conflict Of Interest

Earlier this week, Newsweek reporter Kurt Eichenwald detailed the countless conflicts of interests Donald Trump would face in the White House due to his  business ties to projects around the world.

A story today about Deutsche Bank’s refusal to settle with the U.S. government over claims stemming from it investments in mortgage-backed securities in the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis highlights what could perhaps be Trump's largest conflict of interest in the White House.

The U.S. government is currently demanding $14 billion from the bank, slightly less than the $16.9 billion settlement Bank of America made in 2014. In response , Deutsche Bank issued a statement saying:

Deutsche Bank has no intent to settle these potential civil claims anywhere near the number cited. The negotiations are only just beginning. The bank expects that they will lead to an outcome similar to those of peer banks which have settled at materially lower amounts.

It is likely the next president and the Justice Department will ultimately determine how this case is resolved or take it to trial. If Trump is president, this case will become even more complicated since his ties to Deutsche Bank run deep. The Wall Street Journal reported on their ties:

One of Donald Trump’s closest allies on Wall Street is a now-struggling German bank.

While many big banks have shunned him, Deutsche Bank AG has been a steadfast financial backer of the Republican presidential candidate’s business interests. Since 1998, the bank has led or participated in loans of at least $2.5 billion to companies affiliated with Mr. Trump, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of public records and people familiar with the matter.

That doesn’t include at least another $1 billion in loan commitments that Deutsche Bank made to Trump-affiliated entities.

This raises the question: Is Deutsche holding out on a settlement with the U.S. government in the hope that one of their best clients will become the counterparty in these negotiations? Also, will reporters now ask Trump if he would recuse himself and his attorney general from making any decisions 

Leading Birther Jerome Corsi Now Refuses To Comment On Birtherism

When Donald Trump, after years of fueling the racist birther conspiracy theory, finally said today that President Obama was “born in the United States, period,” we wondered how Trump’s former allies in the birther movement would react.

It turns out that one leading birther is just refusing to talk about it, in an apparent effort to protect Trump from further criticism on the subject.

Jerome Corsi, the WorldNetDaily “reporter” who collaborated with Trump on his birther campaign and wrote two books on the subject, called in today to conservative radio host Rusty Humphries’ program but shut down when Humphries asked him about Trump’s latest comments.

“Rusty, you know, I really don’t even want to get into it anymore,” Corsi said, “and Donald Trump, he didn’t need my help to say what he wants to say, so let Donald on his own. I mean, I support Donald Trump, I’ve been writing about it and I’m much more interested in pursuing my book, ‘Partners in Crime,’ let Donald say whatever he wants to say. I’m not weighing in.”

Corsi was willing to comment, however, on Trump’s new false claim that it was actually Hillary Clinton who started the birther movement.

“Oh, we all know that,” Corsi said. “I mean, Hillary was the first birther. But, Randy [sic], I’m not getting into it, I’m done with the topic until Obama’s out of office, and we’ll find out eventually.”

Reporters who want to talk to him about “the birther,” he said, “can all go to you-know-where.”

“Right now, the left is trying to politicize the issue again,” he claimed. “If the left thinks they can hurt Donald Trump, they all want to talk about the birther. When it was an issue that could have hurt Obama, they all wanted to trash birthers.”

'Historians Will Read About Us': Glenn Beck Declares That Future Generations Will Build Statues Of His Audience

For years, Glenn Beck has been telling his audience that they will go down in history as the ones who saved America when everything collapsed. But now that time has come, he told his studio audience last night, and so they had better be prepared. 

Beck predicted that regardless of whether Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton wins the election, America is headed for utter chaos and destruction, during which members of his audience will emerge as the leaders whom future generations will build statues of and credit with restoring this nation. Most importantly, he promised, they will be richly rewarded by God in heaven.

"You're going to have to be leader," Beck told them. "It's a huge responsibility but it's good" because, if they believe in eternal life, they now "have the big opportunity to step up and really be a person that returns home with honor."

"They will build statues of people from these days some day," Beck said. "Historians will read about us. Not everybody has that opportunity. That's a glorious opportunity given to us."

David Barton: Christians Have A Biblical Responsibility To Vote For Donald Trump

Last night, David Barton spoke at an event hosted by the Dallas Eagle Forum, where he told the conservative Christians who had gathered to hear him speak that they had a biblical responsibility to vote for Donald Trump in November.

Barton, who has previously declared that Trump is "God's guy" in this election and warned that Christians will have to answer to God for failing to support him, told the audience that those who say they cannot vote for Trump don't understand that they are required by the Bible to do so.

"Let's take and apply biblical thinking to the election that we've got right now," Barton said. "We have a lot of Christians and I see them all of the time saying, 'There is no way I can vote for Donald Trump with the kind of lifestyle he's got and what he's been involved with.' Okay, I understand that. But, by the way, I've got to point out what the Bible says in Proverbs 14:34, the measurement you use for a nation at any point in time is 'righteousness exalts a nation, sin is a reproach to any people.' So, Donald Trump doesn't have the righteousness? No, no, God blesses a nation based on the policies in the nation."

Barton then spent the next ten minutes making his standard arguments about the necessity of supporting Trump because the GOP platform is the most biblical it has ever been, as well as highlighting the importance of electing a leader who will appoint good judges and enact policies that reflect the Ten Commandments in order to make the case that Christians have a biblical obligation to vote for Trump.

Citing his favorite right-wing Jewish source, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, Barton declared that there is no word in the Hebrew language for "coincidence" or "retirement" or "fair" because these are all things that have no place in the world that God created. There is also no Hebrew word for "right," Barton stated, because people don't have "rights," they have "responsibilities."

"This generation has become the entitlement generation," Barton said. "They think they're entitled to all sorts of stuff. One of that is we have a right to vote, that is my right and I'm not going to exercise it because I don't like [the candidates]. No, you don't have a right, you have a responsibility. God put a vote in your hand and He's going to ask you what you did with that vote when you came back and if you say, 'I didn't do anything with it,' look up what happened in Matthew 25 and Luke 19; it didn't turn out good for the guy who had been given a trust and didn't do anything with it. See, we don't have a choice of whether we vote in this election. We will vote in this election. That's what Christians ought to understand. They don't have a right to vote, they have a responsibility to vote."

Frank Pavone: 'More Important' That Politicians Oppose Abortion Than Address 'Poverty, Immigration, War And Peace, Homelessness'

Father Frank Pavone, who heads the group Priests for Life, has been hard at work in radio interviews and event appearances trying to convince Catholic voters to overcome their qualms and support Donald Trump in the presidential election simply because he opposes abortion rights while Hillary Clinton supports them.

This has led Pavone to make some interesting leaps of logic, such as telling one radio caller who worried about Trump’s decidedly un-Catholic stances on issues like nuclear war and war crimes that a possible nuclear war under Trump was less of a concern than the definite continuation of legal abortion under Clinton.

Pavone confronted these issues again in an appearance on Tuesday on the Catholic radio network Relevant Radio, when host Drew Mariani asked him about Tim Kaine’s recent prediction that the Catholic Church will eventually change its position on marriage equality. (Mariani mistakenly said that Kaine also predicted that the Church will change its stance on abortion; Kaine, who is pro-choice, has long discussed his personal “faith-based opposition” to abortion.)

The Democratic vice presidential nominee, Pavone said, “represents a brand of thinking” among some Catholics who talk about social justice issues like “poverty, immigration, war and peace, homelessness, health care” when really abortion is “a more important and weighty issue than all these other issues” and it is “more important that someone be right on abortion than they be right on these other issues.”

In fact, he said, “you cannot be right on these other issues if you are wrong on abortion.”

It was such a disservice to the Church. I mean, he represents a brand of thinking, we find it in the Church, we even find it among some clergy, you know, talk about social justice but ignore the core of social justice, which is the right to life. You cannot be right on these other issues, whether it’s poverty, immigration, war and peace, homelessness, health care—let me make a very clear statement here: Not only is abortion a more important and weighty issue than all these other issues and not only is it more important that someone be right on abortion than they be right on these other issues, but I will say it this way, you cannot be right on these other issues if you are wrong on abortion.

And the reason is, to allow abortion is to allow an attack on what is the core, the heart, the foundation of all these other issues, this is the right to life. If I say a baby’s life can be taken, well then I’ve just said his health care can be taken and so can his education and his right to vote and his right to immigrate and his right to anything else, to be protected from terrorism. What does it mean to say the baby should be protected from terrorism if I can get the abortionist to go in there with forceps and chop his head off? I don’t understand. This is basic logic and the people like Tim Kaine who present themselves to us to lead this nation, not only are they contradicting Catholic faith, they’re contradiction reason and they’re contradiction the purpose of public service, which is to serve the public, not to kill the public.

Trump's Birther Lies Pile Up

Yesterday, after Donald Trump refused to tell The Washington Post whether he believes President Obama was born in the United States, his campaign released a statement ludicrously claiming that Hillary Clinton started the birther conspiracy theory and boasting that Trump "brought this ugly incident to its conclusion” by forcing Obama to release his long-form birth certificate in 2011.

“Having successfully obtained President Obama's birth certificate when others could not, Mr. Trump believes that President Obama was born in the United States,” concluded the statement from Trump’s communications adviser Jason Miller.

Trump is now set to deliver remarks addressing the birther issue this morning, which we can expect will repeat some of these same lies.

Trump may pretend, as his campaign has insisted, that he gave up birtherism after Obama made his birth certificate public. That claim is easily disprovable.

As recently as January, Trump was fanning the flames of birtherism, answering a question from CNN on the president’s birthplace: "Who knows? Who cares right now? We're talking about something else, OK?”

“I mean, I have my own theory on Obama. Someday I'll write a book,” he added. “I'll do another book. It'll do very successfully.”

In 2014, Trump said: “Either it’s fine, or he was born in Kenya, or, in my opinion there’s a very good chance he was born here and said he was born in Kenya. Because if you were born in Kenya, you got into colleges and you got aid. Very simple.”

Then there was the time in 2013 when he insinuated on Twitter that the death of a Hawaii health official in a plane crash was related to a cover up of the facts surrounding Obama’s birth:

But even if Trump had given up birtherism in 2011, that still wouldn’t exonerate him from having been a key driver of the racist myth. Trump taking credit for bringing birtherism to its “conclusion” is like an arsonist wanting thanks for a fire he started.

As Brian wrote recently:

For years, Trump has suggested that President Obama fabricated his birth certificate in order to be eligible to run for president. As evidence of this, he has cited the work of Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, “Israeli Science,” the conspiracy theory clearinghouse WorldNetDaily and an unnamed “extremely credible source.”

Trump has falsely claimed that the president spent millions of dollars “to keep this quiet” and wrongly suggested that the president’s grandmother confessed to witnessing his birth in Kenya.

“He cannot give a birth certificate,” he told radio host Laura Ingraham in 2011. He added: “He doesn’t have a birth certificate or, if he does, there’s something on that certificate that is very bad for him. Now somebody told me, and I have no idea whether this is bad for him or not but perhaps it would be, that where it says ‘religion’ it might have ‘Muslim,’ and if you’re a Muslim, you don’t change your religion by the way, but somebody said, ‘Maybe that’s the reason he doesn’t want to show it.’ I don’t think so. I just don’t think he has a birth certificate and everybody has a birth certificate.”

As well as being a leading proponent of the racist birther conspiracy theory, Trump doesn’t seem to have met any conspiracy theory about Obama that he isn’t willing to entertain. He has speculated that Bill Ayers wrote Obama’s book “Dreams From My Father,” that Obama never attended Columbia University, that Obama is secretly Muslim, and that his wedding ring has an “Arabic inscription” on it.

People For the American Way Denounces Trump’s Pro-Life Coalition, Led by Marjorie Dannenfelser

Today, Donald Trump released a letter announcing his Pro-Life Coalition, led by anti-choice leader Marjorie Dannenfelser.

“With the launch of his Pro-Life Coalition, Trump is making it exceptionally clear that he would be a horrifically anti-choice president. Given his pledge to nominate Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade, a Trump presidency would be devastating for women not for four years, but for decades,” said People For the American Way (PFAW) Executive Vice President Marge Baker. “His choice of Marjorie Dannenfelser as coalition leader underscores how dangerous Donald Trump would be for women. She supports banning all abortion, including in cases of rape or when the pregnant woman’s health is in danger.”

“However, there’s one area where Dannenfelser and I have been in agreement: Trump’s sexism,” Baker continued. “Dannenfelser signed a letter earlier this year with other anti-choice leaders stating, ‘we are disgusted by Mr. Trump’s treatment of individuals, women, in particular.’ Trump’s sexist rhetoric and policies have only increased over the last year; it’s unfortunate that Dannenfelser has chosen to condone them.”

Background on Dannenfelser, from People For the American Way’s Right Wing Watch:

Trump’s New ‘Pro-Life’ Adviser Calls Rape Exceptions ‘Abominable,’ Thinks We Should Be More Concerned About ‘Men’s Health’

By Miranda Blue

Donald Trump announced today that he is forming a new “pro-life coalition” that will be led by Marjorie Dannenfelser, the president of the Susan B. Anthony List. Dannenfelser, who warned  in January that Trump would not deliver on the anti-choice movement’s priorities of appointing like minded Supreme Court justices and defunding Planned Parenthood, has come around to Trump since he became the GOP nominee and began promising the anti-choice movement what it wanted.

Trump’s pick of Dannenfelser to head his campaign’s anti-abortion effort shows just how willing he is to hand his reproductive rights policy over to the anti-choice movement. Dannenfelser is a savvy political operative, but she has also been very clear about her ultimate goal: to criminalize abortion in America, without exception.

When the House passed a bill last year banning abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy with a narrow exception for rape and incest survivors, Dannenfelser said that the bill’s rape exception was “regrettable” and “intellectually dishonest,” saying that she’d like to see all abortions banned at “any stage” of pregnancy. In a press conference, Dannenfelser said that although her group supported the legislation, “the rape exception is abominable.”

Dannenfelser has also held a hard line against abortion-ban exemptions for women whose health is at risk, saying in 2012 that her group would not support a candidate who supported health exceptions.

While Dannenfelser’s ultimate goal is to ban abortion without exception, she has said that the best way to achieve that goal is for anti-choice politicians to avoid discussing those exceptions. After Rep. Todd Akin made his infamous “legitimate rape” comment in 2013, the SBA list started training GOP lawmakers to avoid discussing why they want to withhold abortion rights from rape survivors.

Asked in 2015 what she thought it would take for GOP leaders to fully embrace a no-exceptions abortion policy, Dannenfelser responded, “It’s going to take winning.” She cited anti-choice victories in the 2014 elections where “we had unapologetic pro-life people who didn’t talk about rape and incest.”

During the GOP presidential primary, she attacked Republican candidates who criticized their opponents for holding no-exceptions policies. Earlier this year, her group targeted an anti-choice GOP congresswoman who had delayed a vote on the 20-week bill because she was concerned about a police reporting requirement in its rape exception.

Dannenfelser is also a fierce opponent of Planned Parenthood, saying last year that shutting the women’s health provider down would “liberate” its employees “whose hearts are so calloused over.”

Later in 2015, Dannenfelser mocked Planned Parenthood’s “gender-based, grievance-oriented politics,” saying that “real women who truly love what womanhood really is” should also be concerned about “equal rights” for men.

“I love men!” she declared. “What about men’s health? I mean, do we have anything to say about men’s health and the particular health problems that men have? Do we ever talk about the ‘men’s gap’ when we’re moving into an election?”

Dannenfelser, however, has been trying to claim the mantle of feminism for the anti-choice movement. The Susan B. Anthony list is named after the suffragist pioneer; Dannenfelser declared last year that “abortion-centered feminism is dead.”

In January, Dannenfelser signed a letter along with other female anti-choice leaders urging GOP primary voters to “support anyone but Donald Trump.” The group claimed both that Trump couldn’t be “trusted” to back them on abortion policy and that they were “disgusted by Mr. Trump’s treatment of individuals, women, in particular.”

Now, it seems, Trump has made enough promises to the anti-choice movement that Dannenfelser is satisfied on the first count and willing to overlook the second.

Trump's New 'Pro-Life' Adviser Wants To Ban Abortion Without 'Abominable' Exceptions

Donald Trump announced today that he is forming a new “pro-life coalition” that will be led by Marjorie Dannenfelser, the president of the Susan B. Anthony List. Dannenfelser, who warned in January that Trump would not deliver on the anti-choice movement’s priorities of appointing like minded Supreme Court justices and defunding Planned Parenthood, has come around to Trump since he became the GOP nominee and began promising the anti-choice movement what it wanted.

Trump’s pick of Dannenfelser to head his campaign’s anti-abortion effort shows just how willing he is to hand his reproductive rights policy over to the anti-choice movement. Dannenfelser is a savvy political operative, but she has also been very clear about her ultimate goal: to criminalize abortion in America, without exception.

When the House passed a bill last year banning abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy with a narrow exception for rape and incest survivors, Dannenfelser said that the bill’s rape exception was “regrettable” and “intellectually dishonest,” saying that she’d like to see all abortions banned at “any stage” of pregnancy. In a press conference, Dannenfelser said that although her group supported the legislation, “the rape exception is abominable.”

Dannenfelser has also held a hard line against abortion-ban exemptions for women whose health is at risk, saying in 2012 that her group would not support a candidate who supported health exceptions.

While Dannenfelser’s ultimate goal is to ban abortion without exception, she has said that the best way to achieve that goal is for anti-choice politicians to avoid discussing those exceptions. After Rep. Todd Akin made his infamous “legitimate rape” comment in 2013, the SBA list started training GOP lawmakers to avoid discussing why they want to withhold abortion rights from rape survivors.

Asked in 2015 what she thought it would take for GOP leaders to fully embrace a no-exceptions abortion policy, Dannenfelser responded, “It’s going to take winning.” She cited anti-choice victories in the 2014 elections where “we had unapologetic pro-life people who didn’t talk about rape and incest.”

During the GOP presidential primary, she attacked Republican candidates who criticized their opponents for holding no-exceptions policies. Earlier this year, her group targeted an anti-choice GOP congresswoman who had delayed a vote on the 20-week bill because she was concerned about a police reporting requirement in its rape exception.

Dannenfelser is also a fierce opponent of Planned Parenthood, saying last year that shutting the women’s health provider down would “liberate” its employees, “whose hearts are so calloused over.”

Later in 2015, Dannenfelser mocked Planned Parenthood’s “gender-based, grievance-oriented politics,” saying that “real women who truly love what womanhood really is” should also be concerned about “equal rights” for men in health care.

“I love men!” she declared. “What about men’s health? I mean, do we have anything to say about men’s health and the particular health problems that men have? Do we ever talk about the ‘men’s gap’ when we’re moving into an election?”

Dannenfelser, however, has been trying to claim the mantle of feminism for the anti-choice movement. The Susan B. Anthony List is named after the suffragist pioneer; Dannenfelser declared last year that “abortion-centered feminism is dead.”

In January, Dannenfelser signed a letter along with other female anti-choice leaders urging GOP primary voters to “support anyone but Donald Trump.” The group claimed both that Trump couldn’t be “trusted” to back them on abortion policy and that they were “disgusted by Mr. Trump’s treatment of individuals, women, in particular.”

Now, it seems, Trump has made enough promises to the anti-choice movement that Dannenfelser is satisfied on the first count and willing to overlook the second.

Bryan Fischer: Diversity And Multiculturalism Are God's Curse Upon America Because We Have Become Utterly Evil

On his radio program yesterday, Bryan Fischer reiterated his view that the "proliferation of languages" in America is a curse that God has placed upon this nation "to protect us from ourselves" because we have become fundamentally evil and a menace to the entire world.

"This kind of diversity is not a blessing," Fischer said. "This kind of multiculturalism is not a blessing, it is a curse" that God has imposed upon us so that we cannot communicate easily with one another in order to thwart our evil plans, just as he did those seeking to construct the Tower of Babel in the book of Genesis.

By not insisting that those seeking to immigrate to the United States first be required to pass an English literacy test and be willing assimilate into our culture, Fischer said, America is bringing God's curse upon ourselves.

"The confusion of languages is a check on the evil that otherwise a nation would do," he claimed, "and I think that's what's happening here in America, that this is a part of God's judgment on America because we have drifted from Him and now, increasingly, the plans and intentions of the heart of the American people, the American government, our cultural leaders are evil." 

"I think what's going on here," Fischer concluded, "God is saying, 'This lack of assimilation that is caused by this profusion of languages, it's actually something that I am using to check the evil that the United States otherwise would do.'"

Mat Staver: Legal Abortion Will 'Bring God's Wrath Down On A Nation'

At last weekend’s Values Voter Summit, the conservative legal group Liberty Counsel distributed a new booklet written by its founder and chairman, Mat Staver, titled “Planned Parenthood Exposed!”

Staver’s booklet is mostly a rehashing of the Planned Parenthood smear videos produced by David Daleiden last year, but it ends on a more apocalyptic note.

Noting that Daleiden based his project on a similar effort by anti-abortion activist Mark Crutcher, who, in the late 1990s, also tried to attack legal abortion with a flawed “investigation” of the practice of fetal tissue research, Staver writes that Daleiden has given America “one more chance” to “bring fetal tissue trafficking to a halt” and “ultimately, to end legal abortion in America.”

If the U.S. fails to take this opportunity to criminalize abortion, he writes, we will face the wrath and judgment of God, just as God cursed Cain after he murdered Abel:

Now, America gets one more chance to make that happen—and it’s crucial we keep pressure on politicians to bring fetal tissue trafficking to a halt. And, ultimately, to end legal abortion in America.

The stakes are enormous—for the unborn, for America and each one of us.

That’s because God is just and will act to avenge the lives of innocents taken by abortion. When Cain killed Abel, God told him, “The voice of your brother’s blood cries out to Me from the ground So now you are cursed from the earth” (Genesis 4:10-11). Just as Abel’s blood cried out to God for justice and brought a curse on Cain, the blood of more than 58 million precious unborn humans—the most innocent of victims—also cries out to God.

And just as God cursed Cain, so too His curse rests on our nation which protects the right of a mother and her doctor to end the life of her child. The shedding of innocent blood pollutes or defiles a land and will bring God’s wrath down on a nation, as it did ancient Israel

Likewise, the death of innocent preborn infants, their blood spilled (and harvested) in abortion facilities across America, invites God’s judgment on modern America. “The Lord hates…the shedding of innocent blood” (Proverbs 6:17) and holds people accountable for what they do to protect the innocent from murder…

Joseph Farah: Hillary Clinton's Election Will Lead To God's Judgment On America

Yesterday, WorldNetDaily founder Joseph Farah appeared on E.W. Jackson’s “Awakening” radio program to warn that the U.S. will witness national devastation and divine judgment if Hillary Clinton is elected president.

“This is an evil woman,” he said of Clinton. “We will not be able to recognize this country and what it was if we give her four years in the White House. Slam the door shut on a future America that has any semblance of liberty and justice.”

While he said the election of Ronald Reagan “brought a blessing on this country” that “lasted more than 10 years,” Farah predicted that Clinton’s election would lead to God’s judgment.

“If we reward her non-accomplishment, her non-achievement and her self-interested self-dealings that are so evident, we are asking God to judge us very, very sternly,” he said.

Glenn Beck Warns That President Obama 'Is Giving Away The Internet'

Back in late 2014 and early 2015, Glenn Beck issued several dire warnings, predicting that the United States would destroy the internet and drive him out of business if it implemented net neutrality.

America deserved "to be destroyed," he proclaimed, if we were such "morons" that we couldn't see that we were ruining the internet, and with it, the last bastion of freedom in the world.

Beck's opposition to net neutrality, of course, was rooted entirely in his own ignorance about what it actually was. In fact, it has now been in effect for over a year and Beck is still on the air, despite guaranteeing that "voices like ours will be gone" if it were to be enacted.

Given Beck's willingness to spout off about things he clearly doesn't understand, it was no surprise to hear him kick off his radio show today by warning that President Obama "is giving away the internet" and handing it over to Russia, China and Iran.

Beck was, predictably, supporting Sen. Ted Cruz's dishonest crusade against plans to allow oversight of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to transition to an international body at the end of the month.

As PolitiFact noted yesterday, ICANN is simply tasked with ensuring "that the domain names we use for websites and emails are globally consistent" and while "the U.S. government is set to no longer have a contract to oversee certain internet-related duties having to do with all of us finding websites [these] tasks will continue to be handled through a California nonprofit that’s been in place since 1998" that will now be overseen by a multi-national advisory panel. 

Beck clearly did not understand anything about this, which is why he spent the entire opening segment of his radio program today warning that this is all part of a plot by George Soros to "grab control of the internet."

God Tells Jim Bakker Not To Believe The Polls Showing Trump Losing

Last week, televangelist Jim Bakker recounted a recent discussion he had with God about the state of the presidential race. God, Bakker said, hinted to him that the polls showing Donald Trump trailing Hillary Clinton are wrong: “I said, ‘God, what’s going on?’ I said, ‘It looks like Trump’s not gonna make it the way it’s going.’ And do you want to know what God said to me? He said, ‘You know, the polls could be wrong.’”

Bakker reported that God told him that Trump voters live in fear of anti-Trump “hatemongers” and as a result are reluctant to express their support for the GOP presidential nominee to pollsters.

“He said, ‘The people are in fear in this country, the church is in fear,’” Bakker recalled, “and he said, ‘They’re afraid to even say that they’re voting for Trump. They don’t want to tell anybody. They’re afraid.’ Now, I’m not saying I’m right, I’m just saying this is what happened this week, a few days, a few hours ago. Donald Trump fans are afraid to say they’re on his side because they are in fear of the hatemongers, they’re afraid for their lives.”

Michael Savage Wants To Run A New HUAC In Donald Trump's Administration

On Tuesday, right-wing radio host Michael Savage said he wants Donald Trump to restore the House Un-American Activities Committee or a similar committee focused on “hunting down subversives” and volunteered to lead the inquiry himself.

“We need a new HUAC but you can’t call it HUAC,” Savage said, “but we have to unmask the traitors within because we’re facing grave danger from these traitors.”

Savage named dozens of supposedly “subversive” groups that he wants investigated, including People For the American Way, the American Civil Liberties Union, MoveOn, Center for American Progress, Black Lives Matter, Media Matters and the National Council of Churches.

“If Trump wins, which is a longshot by the way with the voter fraud that’s on the horizon, the electronic fraud is being set up as I speak by the vermin that work for Soros and others, they’re going to steal the election as sure as I’m sitting here, but if Trump should win, that’s when our work really would begin,” he said.

Trump has appeared on Savage’s show several times and even floated the possibility of naming him to a position in his administration. Savage has previously said that Trump should “rule by decree” and deliberately violate the civil rights of liberals.

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