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The Case Against the Confirmation of John Ashcroft As Attorney General of the United States: Part II

As Governor, Ashcroft staunchly opposed efforts to require church-run day care centers to meet even minimal health and safety regulations such as state fire codes and health requirements. Missouri was the only state that exempted them completely from those regulations. His opposition raises serious concerns not only about his preferential treatment of religious institutions, but also about how he, as attorney general, would interpret and implement so-called "charitable choice" laws.

The Case Against the Confirmation of John Ashcroft As Attorney General of the United States: Part II

Ashcroft frequently used his veto to balance the state budget or otherwise reject legislation in a way that increased the burden on those least able to bear it. For example, on July 13, 1990, Ashcroft vetoed a bill that would have provided eight weeks of unpaid leave to new birth and adoptive mothers. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch condemned Ashcroft’s veto in an editorial: "The veto of this bill pitted the welfare of business against the welfare of the family - and the family lost.

The Case Against the Confirmation of John Ashcroft As Attorney General of the United States: Part II

Both as Attorney General and Governor of Missouri, John Ashcroft was well known as an opponent of school desegregation programs in St. Louis and Kansas City. Differences of legal and political opinion existed then and now on this subject, and such differences alone would not constitute significant grounds for opposing Ashcroft’s nomination. But Ashcroft’s conduct in Missouri went far beyond such differences of opinion. Ashcroft spent years and significant state resources in efforts to stymie voluntary St.

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