The Voters Speak in 2002: Fully Fund and Strengthen Public Education

Appendix: Vote Totals and Summaries of November 2002 Education Initiatives

Vote totals are from state election offices and were gathered, unless otherwise noted, on November 20, 2002. In some states, certification of these vote totals is pending.

Class Size

StateElection Results
Unofficial pending certification
Initative Details
FLYES
2,550,201 – 52%

NO
2,317,671 – 48%

Amendment 9—Will require the state to set a maximum classroom size in primary and secondary schools: 18 students for grades pre-K-3; 22 students for grades 4-8; and 25 students for grades 9-12, and provide the funding to meet those levels by 2010.

Universal Pre-Kindergarten and Before- and After-School Programs

StateElection Results
Unofficial pending certification
Initative Details
FLYES
2,868,500 – 59%

NO
1,974,408 - 41%

Amendment 8—Will require the state to offer every 4-year-old in Florida a free, voluntary, and high-quality pre-kindergarten learning opportunity by the 2005-06 school year. The pre-kindergarten funding can not be taken from existing school or health funding.
CAYES
3,942,993 – 57%

NO
3,021,639 – 43%

Proposition 49—Will increase state grant funds by up to $550 million annually for before- and after-school programs that provide tutoring, homework assistance, and education enrichment.

School Construction Funding


StateElection Results
Unofficial pending certification
Initative Details
CAYES
4,135,512 - 59%

NO
2,867,796 – 41%

Proposition 47—Will provide a $13.5 billion general-obligation bond for construction and renovation of public education facilities.
OR67YES
653,366 – 56%

NO
523,126 – 44%

Measure 15 – Will authorize certain bonds for seismic rehabilitation of public education buildings.

General Education Funding Plans

StateElection Results
Unofficial pending certification
Initative Details
AZYES
758,695 – 70%

NO
323,626 – 30%

Proposition 104—Will remove the current limitation on how much revenue from the state sales tax is allowed to be spent on education.
AZYES
855,687 – 76%

NO
274,316 – 24%

Proposition 300—Will direct earnings from public lands that are above the 2000-01 level to be deposited in the state classroom-site fund, to be used for purposes including class size reduction, teacher raises, and school facilities bond debt.
TNYES
892,049 – 57%

NO
659,783 – 43%

Amendment 1—Will create a state lottery and dedicate the revenues to education, including assistance to attend in-state colleges, improving K-12 facilities, early learning programs, and after-school programs.
UTYES
287,820 – 63%

NO
171,167 – 37%

Amendment 1—Will make changes to the investment of state school money to allow dividends from the State School Fund to be spent on public education rather than being added to the fund's principal.
NVNO
273,647 – 57%

YES
203,560 – 43%

Question 7—Would have amended the state Constitution to allow an exemption from the state debt limit for state contracts necessary for the improvement, acquisition, or construction of public elementary and secondary schools.
AZNO
947,341 – 80%

YES
234,935 – 20%

Proposition 201—Would have allowed slot machines at horse and dog racetracks, and would extend the authorization of Indian tribes to operate casinos on tribal lands. Racetracks would have been required to pay 40% of their gross gaming revenue from the operation of slot machines to the state to fund reading programs for K-3, among other programs.
AZYES
610,900 – 51%

NO
590,064 – 49%

Proposition 202—Will extend tribal gaming compacts and require tribes to pay 1 - 8% of gross gaming revenue to the state to fund classroom size reduction, teacher salary increases, dropout prevention, and instructional improvement, among other programs.
IDYES
232,561 – 58%

NO
169,680 – 42%

Proposition 1—Would allow video gaming on tribal lands and require tribes to contribute 5% of annual net gaming income to educational programs and schools on or near reservations.
MINO
2,005,545 – 66%

YES
1,017,326 – 34%

Proposal 4—Would have reallocated approximately $300 million from tobacco-settlement funds to various health-care programs and efforts to deter tobacco use. This revenue currently funds a college scholarship program for graduating high school seniors.
MONO
912,210 – 51%

YES
881,701 – 49%

Proposition A—Would have amended current law to impose an additional tax of 2.75 cents per cigarette (55 cents per pack) and 20% on other tobacco products, with the new revenues being placed in a Healthy Families Trust Fund to be used for a variety of social services, including early child care and education.

Bilingual Education and Other Education-Related Initiatives

StateElection Results
Unofficial pending certification
Initative Details
CONO
765,537 – 56%

YES
599,126 – 44%

Amendment 31—Would have required that public school children be taught in English in their class rooms and require that children who were learning English be placed in an English-immersion program that was intended to last one year or less, and that, if successful, would result in placement of such students in regular classrooms.
MA68YES
1,356,017 – 68%

NO
637,427 – 32%

Question 2—Will require that, with limited exceptions, all public school children be placed in English-language classrooms and be taught all subjects in that language. The measure would require public schools to educate English-language learners through a sheltered immersion program, normally not lasting more than one year.
NE69NO
234,530 – 57%

YES
178,769 – 43%

Proposed Amendment 1—Would have eliminated wording in the state Constitution that says all official government proceedings, including classroom instruction, should be conducted only in English.
HI70YES
229,961 – 60%

NO
127,035 – 40%

Question 2—Will authorize the state to issue revenue bonds to assist private and religious elementary schools, secondary schools, colleges, and universities.

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