Staver: Gay Marriage Is Leading America 'Into The Very Pit Of Hell'

Back in July, Liberty Counsel's Mat Staver spoke at the Reclaiming America for Christ conference in Oklahoma where he spent a half-hour absolutely fuming about the Supreme Court's gay marriage ruling, calling it a "grave sin" that would lead America "into the very pit of Hell."

Staver, who has recently been leading Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis' unsuccessful legal battle, was beside himself with outrage, declaring that neither the Supreme Court nor any state could ever legalize gay marriage because doing so contradicts the will of God and therefore Christians have no choice but to resist with all their might.

"We need to stop playing charades," Staver thundered, "thinking that five individuals can re-write God's natural, created order of marriage as a union of a man and a woman, and 320 million Americans are simply just going to follow them like the Pied Piper off the cliff into the very pit of Hell. If that's what they think, they have something else coming because as for me and my household, I will not obey those five! I will obey God rather than man and they have shaken their fist in the face of the Creator and we must resist that."

The ruling, he warned, "is a grave sin. There will be judgment on those five unless they repent."

Rainbow Doritos A Gay Gateway Drug

The announcement yesterday that Doritos will soon release rainbow-colored chips to support the It Gets Better Project, which works towards preventing anti-LGBT bullying, naturally drew the ire of conservative pundits like John Nolte of Breitbart, who said that Doritos is flying the “colors of anti-Christian hate and oppression.”

But Nolte’s protests pale in comparison to a column in the right-wing American Thinker by Ed Straker, which could be confused for parody.

Straker writes that the new chips are “the perfect gateway snack to introduce children to the joys of homosexuality,” lamenting that nowadays “it’s perceived to be cool to push a specific sexual orientation on children.”

Calling for a boycott of Doritos and all products from its parent company, Pepsi, Straker urges conservatives to “push other companies to launch pro-heterosexual campaigns” by, for example, persuading “a hot dog maker and a hot dog bun company to do a joint effort promoting man-woman relationships.”

PepsiCo, who make Doritos (through subsidiary Frito-Lay), are producing a homosexual version of Doritos called "Rainbow Doritos." Doritos are a product marketed to children, so they make the perfect gateway snack to introduce children to the joys of homosexuality.



What business does PepsiCo have pushing homosexuality on our kids? This is how far our culture has shifted; it's perceived to be cool to push a specific sexual orientation on children, even by companies that produce products that have nothing to do with sex. What's next – gay toilet paper and tampons?



I think we need to boycott Pepsi and all related Frito-Lay products to deliver a message to Pepsi that if they are going to push gay propaganda on our kids, we are not going to give their products lip service any longer.

Furthermore, I think we should push other companies to launch pro-heterosexual campaigns. Perhaps we could persuade a hot dog maker and a hot dog bun company to do a joint effort promoting man-woman relationships.

Bryan Fischer Falsely Claims 'The Constitution Rested On The Foundation Of The Bible'

Immediately following a segment on his radio program yesterday in which Bryan Fischer declared that it is his goal to "create the most biblically and constitutionally literate listening audience" in America, he told his audience that the Bible was the single greatest influence on the framing of the Constitution.

Unsurprisingly, this claim originated with David Barton, the right-wing pseudo-historian who first spread the false claim that a 1984 study by Donald Lutz and Charles Hyneman called "The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought" had found that the Constitution was largely based upon the Bible, according to a review of documents published during the founding era.

Fischer mindlessly repeated this claim on his program, asserting that "the book of Deuteronomy was the primary source of the standards that were incorporated in Western law and Western jurisprudence" and insisting that "the Constitution rested on the foundation of the Bible and biblical truth."

As we have pointed out before, these claims rest on a complete misrepresentation of what the study actually found and they have been repeatedly debunked, so much so that Joel McDurmon of the ultra-right-wing organization American Vision was forced to write a piece entitled "To my Christian America friends: Please, stop citing the Lutz study!"

[T]hat study does not prove this point. In fact, when you read all of the study, it proves just the opposite: the framers of the American Constitution abandoned biblical quotations in favor of the secular authors. I don’t know who originally read it to say otherwise, but for the sake of credibility, scholarship, and faithful witness, it needs to stop.

The percentage of Bible quotations reported in that study 1) comes from an earlier period than the Constitutional period, 2) represents a strongly overweighted minority sample in the data, 3) appears mostly in only 10 percent of the actual sources included in the study, 4) appears in sources not written by the men who actually did the framing, 5) appears in sources probably not even read by the framers. The study itself excludes the vast majority of relevant material that such a study should have included.

...

Too all my friends and fellow-laborers in Restoring America, Christian America, Monumental America, Christianity and the Constitution, followers of Verna Hall, Rosalie Slater, Vision Forum, Wall Builders, and anyone else, anywhere even remotely associated with such a project: Please, quit citing Lutz and Hyneman as proof the Framers of the Constitution quoted the Bible more than any other source. They did not, and misreading studies like this, and thereby perpetuating myths like this, is one reason liberal scholars so often laugh at you. It’s not always merely because they hate God. Sometimes, it’s because we give them reason.

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/17/15

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 9/17/15

  • Evangelicals should love Donald Trump because he is "absolutely the best leader and he’s absolutely the best guy to take this country out of the morass."
  • Erik Rush is very sad about Glenn Beck.
  • Laurie Roth is no fan of Common Core: "We might as well send our kids off to ‘Hitler’s mind grooming camp’. We are told to live with Common Core, which is literally stealing the minds and achievement potential of our children."
  • E.W. Jackson will host "The Christian Awakening Project," because apparently there just aren't enough conferences calling "Americans to return to God, to the Bible, to Church, to family as God designed it."
  • Finally, let's all wish Kim Davis a happy birthday.

Santorum: 'Tragedy' American Jews Don't Care About Israel's Survival

In an interview today on “The Steve Malzberg Show,” Rick Santorum claimed that American evangelicals care more about the future of Israel than do American Jews, a situation that he called a “tragedy.”

Santorum made his comments in response to a question about a typically tasteful tweet from Ann Coulter during last night’s GOP debate, in which she criticized the numerous mentions of Israel, asking, “How many f---ing Jews do these people think there are in the United States?” Coulter later insisted that she was only criticizing Republican presidential candidates for pandering to evangelical voters on the issue.

Santorum said that Coulter was out of line and harming the conservative cause, adding that “Bible-believing Christians” in the U.S. “understand the significance of the heritage of the Jewish people in the Holy Land.”

He went on to say that conservative Christians are far more interested in saving Israel from President Obama and the Iranian government than are American Jews: “Interestingly enough, as you know very well, Steve, it is probably less important to the Jewish community these days than it is in the evangelical Christian community, which is another tragedy in itself.”

Rick Santorum Suggests Liberal And Gay Catholics Can't Be Real Catholics

Some conservative bloggers are up in arms that the White House has invited a number of prominent Catholics of whom they disapprove to a large reception at the White House greeting Pope Francis next week, including Sister Simone Campbell, leader of the “Nuns on the Bus” social justice group; Mateo Williamson, a transgender man with the Catholic LGBT group Dignity USA; retired Episcopal Bishop Gene Robinson, the first openly gay bishop in the denomination; and Aaron Jay Ledesma, a gay Catholic activist.

Today, Newsmax host Steve Malzberg asked Rick Santorum about the “scandal,” which the former senator said “shows the contempt that the president has for people of faith.” Apparently Santorum thinks that liberals or members of the LGBT community cannot be true people of faith.

Santorum insisted that Obama would never invite gay Muslims or Muslims who support gay rights to the White House. “As you know, under Sharia law, they throw gays off buildings and kill them,” he said, alluding to ISIS’ barbaric executions of gays. “But you won’t see the president standing up to the Muslim community, the radical Muslim community, and having gay Muslim activists out there. But when it comes to the Christian faith, then all bets are off. You’re allowed to impose and try to influence as best you can the spin on these meetings and that is what the president is doing.”

While Santorum is denigrating Obama for his supposed “contempt” for people of faith, Santorum said back in 2008 that mainline Protestants are under the influence of Satan.

Jeb Bush Touts Voucher Program That Funds Christian Schools, Religious Right Ideology

At Wednesday night’s presidential debate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush went out of his way to tout “a voucher program that was created under my watch, the largest voucher program in the country, where kids can go to a Christian school” — a phrase he sandwiched into a conversation about Donald Trump criticizing him for speaking Spanish in public.

Julie Ingersoll, a religious studies professor at the University of North Florida, tweeted a reminder that her book on Christian Reconstructionism, which was recently released by Oxford University Press, mentions Bush’s voucher program. “Building God’s Kingdom: Inside the World of Christian Reconstructionism” includes chapters on the enormous influence of Christian Reconstructionism in the homeschooling and Christian school movements, which have succeeded in getting states like Florida to funnel taxpayer money to their religious education efforts

Christian Reconstructionism, grounded in the teachings of 20th-century writer R.J. Rushdoony, has greatly influenced both the Religious Right and Tea Party movements with its doctrine of “sphere sovereignty,” which states that God has given government, church, and family specific responsibilities over different “spheres.” Reconstructionists argue that there is no biblical authority for the government to take on a duty that is given to church or family – for example, they argue that the government has no role in caring for the poor because charity is the job of the church.

Reconstructionism teaches that education is the duty of parents, and that the state therefore has no role in or legitimate authority over the education of children. Reconstructionists led legal and political battles to win the right of parents to homeschool their children, and continue to resist efforts at regulating homeschoolers. As Ingersoll notes, “Reconstructionists are unabashedly committed to the dismantling of public education, and their strategies and solutions have gained a hearing far beyond the boundaries of the small groups explicitly affiliated with them.” In June, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott named a right-wing homeschooler to chair the state’s Board of Education.

The organized and intensely active network of evangelical homeschooling families in Iowa is credited, in part, with Mike Huckabee’s win in the 2008 Iowa caucus, and the Associated Press reported this year that presidential candidates have been jockeying for its leaders’ support.

Ingersoll also explores how central creationism is to the Christian Reconstructionist worldview; as others have noted, creationism also forms the basis of “science” education in books and curricula used by some Christian schools and homeschoolers.

Ingersoll writes about the independent, Reconstructionism-inspired Rocky Bayou Christian School in Niceville, Florida, which was founded in the 1970s. In addition to the hundreds of students in its K-12 program, the school offers a program allowing homeschoolers to participate in courses and activities. Writes Ingersoll, “RCBS also has a program designed to take advantage of Florida’s school voucher plan. The plan, put into place by former Governor Jeb Bush, permits students at ‘failing public schools’ to obtain vouchers that can be used at any school.”

According to Ingersoll, the Bush voucher program “has become such a significant revenue stream” for Rocky Bayou Christian School that “it would have a major impact on the school if the state were to decide to discontinue the controversial program….”  But, she notes, “the conservative legislature took up the effort to expand the state’s privatization of public education with vouchers and the expansion of charter schools.”

Indeed, legislation signed by Gov. Rick Scott last year expanded voucher and tax-credit programs; it also, according to the Orlando Sentinel, created state-funded “personal learning scholarship accounts” that “parents of students with certain disabilities can use to pay for private school, buy home-school curriculum or pay for needed therapies, among other services, if their child is not in public school.”

Florida is not the only state where proponents of privatization have won victories. Louisiana’s Bobby Jindal used the Katrina disaster to push through a radical privatization scheme and has battled the Obama administration over its efforts to monitor the state’s voucher program’s effect on racial segregation. Proponents of “school choice” had a major victory in Nevada this year, where a law pushed by an education foundation created by Jeb Bush would allow parents of any income level to “pull a child from the state's public schools and take tax dollars with them, giving families the option to use public money to pay for private or parochial school or even for home schooling.” While some Christian homeschoolers want no part of voucher programs, because they believe taking voucher money would bring more intrusive government regulation, laws like Nevada’s could prove a windfall for Religious Right and Christian Reconstructionist groups that provide curricula to homeschoolers.

Ingersoll writes about a 2009 Men’s Leadership Summit hosted by the Christian Home Educators of Colorado at an Indianapolis facility of Bill Gothard’s Institute for Biblical Life Principles, a troubling organization in the news recently for its connection to the Duggar family. The purpose of the summit, writes Ingersoll, was the development of a “Christian Education Manifesto,” which is no longer public, but whose goals included the elimination of public education and dismantling of government agencies that regulate the rights of parents, such as child welfare and child protective service groups.

There have been some setbacks for the privatization movement. In June, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled that its state’s Choice Scholarship Pilot Program violates the state Constitution by channeling public money to private religious schools, contrary to an explicit constitutional prohibition on doing so.

But, as Ingersoll notes, the massively funded privatization movement is advancing the dream of the Christian Reconstructionists:

Florida’s efforts mirror attempts across the nation to shift the delivery of public education to the private sector; a shift of tax money from a public endeavor intended to educate and foster a shared sense of what it means to be American to sectarian efforts, including efforts at schools like Rocky Bayou which seek to transform society according to biblical law. The long-standing goal of the Christian Reconstructionists to defund, and ultimately eliminate, public education has come as close as it has ever come to being a reality.

Jesse Lee Peterson: Gay Marriage Different Because 'It's Not About Love'

Right-wing activist Jesse Lee Peterson joined “The Steve Malzberg Show” on Newsmax yesterday to discuss his recent column comparing Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who is refusing marriage licenses to gay couples, to Rosa Parks.

When guest host Amy Holmes asked Peterson if a clerk should be able to cite his or her religious beliefs to deny marriage a license to a person like Davis who has been married multiple times, Peterson explained that it’s an entirely different issue because unlike such marriages, “homosexuality is not about values” and “it’s not about love,” but instead is “based on sex.”

While homosexuality is all about sex, he explained, anti-gay discrimination has nothing to do with sex.

“A marriage is between a man and a woman, not between two men and two women,” he said. “That has been the rule forever, ever since mankind has been on earth, so what homosexuals are trying to do is to get you to change the rules based on sex. And Kim Davis is not concerned about who they have sex with, but when it comes to comparing it to a man and woman being married, then it’s a different story.”

Phyllis Schlafly On The $10 Bill And Other Eagle Forum Finds

When Jake Tapper asked the Republican presidential candidates at last night’s debate which American woman they would put on the $10 bill, some named their wives or daughters, some named non-Americans, and some named Planned Parenthood board member Rosa Parks, but nobody picked Phyllis Schlafly, the anti-feminist hero whom several of the candidates have credited with shaping their conservative views.

That’s too bad, because the Phyllis Schlafly $10 bill has already been designed.

At last week’s Eagle Council, the annual gathering of Schlafly’s Eagle Forum, which was attended by Ben Carson, Ted Cruz, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum and other Republican leaders, speaker after speaker praised Schlafly’s role in fighting the Equal Rights Amendment but lamented that nefarious feminist plots, such as the campaign to put a woman on the $10 bill, have gained traction under the Obama administration.

Schlafly’s son John quipped that the White House wants to have Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, grace the $10 bill, but Eagle Forum had other ideas, offering attendees this sample currency design:

Attendees wandering Eagle Council’s exhibit hall also had the opportunity to pick up several “informative” pamphlets on the dangers of sex, filled with misleading or outdated claims.

The above pamphlet, distributed by a Snowflake, Arizona, outfit called Heritage House 76, cites only articles written between 1987 and 1993, and contains claims such as: “When doctors work on someone with AIDS they put on two pairs of gloves, a full gown over their clothes, a mask and goggles. Even then, they don’t feel completely ‘safe.’”

“Latex breaks down in heat, yet condoms are transported in trucks that get so hot you can fry an egg!” it reads. “Do you want to live? Would you like to raise a family, have a career or follow a dream? Then don’t buy the ‘safe sex’ lie — it can kill you.”

A “Say ‘No’ To Drugs!” pamphlet we picked up at the event doesn’t mention drugs like cocaine or heroin, as one might expect.

Instead, it focuses on a far worse drug: the pill.

Warning that the “dangerous” birth control pill “can make you sterile,” the pamphlet (which does not identify its author or publisher) urges readers to remain abstinent until marriage: “Having sex before marriage is sort of like giving out all your Christmas gifts in July. It may be fun at the time. But when that big day comes around, the presents have all been given out!”

And it’s not just the pill that poses a danger, according to the pamphlet: “Using rubbers (condoms) to prevent AIDS is like playing Russian Roulette—your life is at stake!”

Eagle Council participants were also able to pick up plenty of useful information on the danger that public education poses to children.

In a booklet titled “Government Education…Is this what we want for our children?,” the anti-public-education group Citizens United for Responsible Education tells parents that social studies classes in public schools are “anti-Christian” and “pro-Islam.” Along with exalting Islam, the booklet alleges, “government schools” are trying to “promote atheism, homosexuality, and disrespect for parents and their values.” Even worse, public schools are pushing “pagan” worship and have made sure that “children are bullied into accepting evolution as scientific fact against their Biblical beliefs.”

But fortunately there are alternatives to raising atheist Muslim gay neo-pagan kids.

“God’s Standards for Educating Our Children,” a booklet produced by a Christian publisher in Kentucky, tells parents to consider homeschooling or private Christian education in order to avoid the “pagan and God-ignoring” influences of public schools, noting that “the danger of a child admiring and becoming attached to the unchristian teacher is great.” Other threats include “self-expression” and the same sort of sexual education classes that have destroyed Sweden:

The teaching of self-expression is in complete opposition to Bible principle. It militates against a life of obedience and submission. Disobedience, demonstrations, riots, and campus disorders are all a product of the exercising of self-expression.



The emphasis on sex education is not Biblical. The school was never intended to replace the teaching of the home but to supplement it. It is impossible for immoral, unregenerated, and defiled individuals to teach a subject such as this without being suggestive, thus demoralizing any moral that might be present. Sweden, after ten years of compulsory sex education, is the most immoral nation in the world. Sex relations at an early age is prevalent.

Eagle Forum offered copies of the August issue of its “Education Reporter” newsletter, which claims that “children at schools are indoctrinated into acceptance of whatever the [teachers’] union decides is normal. Programs supposedly meant to prevent bullying are actually meant to bully children into compliance.”

The newsletter attacks opponents of gay “conversion” therapy: “If assistance is offered that could possibly influence a person to leave the LGBTQ community, it is considered to be brainwashing and, by definition, negative. Although embracing and mainstreaming transgenderism could be more dangerous than providing therapy to help children adjust to their biological makeup.”

Other books available at the conference, including many dealing with signs of the impending apocalypse, were unfortunately for sale at a steep price, and Schlafly’s $10 bills sadly aren’t legal tender.

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