South Carolina GOP House Nominee Makes Birther Joke, Questions Obama's 'Lineage'

The newly-elected Republican nominee to challenge Rep. Jim Clyburn in South Carolina played into the birther conspiracy theory in a speech to a Tea Party rally last year.

Anthony Culler, who won the Republican primary in South Carolina’s sixth congressional district last night, told the crowd at the February 2013 “Day of Resistance” rally that bipartisan gun background check legislation is a “Trojan horse” for the government to “target you.”

He then threw in a birther joke: “How is it that on every single shooting they track back the lineage of that gun better than you can Barack Obama?”

Cullen, a self-described “gun nut” holds strong social conservative positions, including opposition to abortion rights and “sinful ‘alternative’ lifestyles” and blames Clyburn for keeping his constituents “ shackled in the chains of poverty.” In a recent Facebook post, he wrote, “Ever notice how non-Christians believe Christians and our values should not be allowed in politics and government but we are to be open-minded to their un-Godly beliefs? (And to think polite Christians actually fall for this stupid and illogical double standard and stand down.)”

Interestingly, Cullen his bucked his party by vowing to vote against any entitlement cuts.

He and his family previously made news by protesting their bank over disputed mineral rights, leading to their eviction and seizure of their property.

Clyburn has handily won all of his recent reelection bids in the heavily Democratic, majority African American district, something that Culler might not be able to change if he keeps on making birther jokes.

David Brat Says Liberals Are 'Nervous' About Countries 'Feeding Their People,' Claims Win 'Came Straight Out Of Heaven'

Glenn Beck, who only recently began promoting economics professor David Brat’s primary campaign against Eric Cantor, hosted Brat on his radio show today to discuss his unexpected victory and purported media attacks.

After insisting that he is not a far-right candidate since he is part of the “compassionate party,” Brat said that progressives are getting worried about falling hunger in developing countries: “China and India are feeding their people in the first time in human history due to free markets and the left knows that and it gets them nervous.”

In another interview with American Family Association radio host Dan Celia, who said his win was the work of God and conservative talk radio hosts, Brat claimed his victory “came straight out of Heaven.”

He similarly told Fox News that “God acted through people on my behalf” in his primary victory.

Huelskamp's Republican Challenger Blasted For Having Appeared In 'Homosexual Movie'

Rep. Tim Huelskamp of Kansas is facing two challengers in the Republican primary in August, one of whom has now come under attack by anti-gay activists in the state for having appeared in a "homosexual movie" filmed several years ago that was written and directed by a friend of his.

Alan LaPolice, who is challenging Huelskamp for the seat representing Kansas' First District, had a small role in a movie entitled "The Art of Being Straight" for which he is now being criticized by Religious Right activists:

Congressional candidate Alan LaPolice’s appearance in the movie “The Art of Being Straight,” has become an issue in his primary race against U.S. Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Fowler/Hutchinson.

“I am very concerned that a candidate for national office would be so out of touch with the deeply held beliefs of a great many Kansans,” said Dennis Blick, chairman of the board for Kansas Family Policy Council, Wichita.

“KFPC believes Kansans deserve candidates of the highest integrity committed to traditional Judeo-Christian values, which have been the bedrock of rural Kansas communities for generations,” Blick said in a press release Tuesday from the KFPC.

Phillip Cosby, director of the American Family Association of Kansas and Missouri, said in the release that it’s “highly inappropriate” to be “featured in a homosexual movie.”

LaPolice was an actor but principally an educator in California before moving back to Clyde last year. He told The News recently he said yes to a friend and appeared in the friend’s movie that was shot around 2006. LaPolice played a character he described as a homophobic bigot.

For this part, LaPolice insists that he is a practicing Catholic who is "happily married with three beautiful daughters" who only appeared in the film as a favor to a friend. LaPolice says his scene lasted less than a minute and asserts that "anyone attempting to undermine my candidacy by fixating on a very small movie role from nearly 10 years ago would be guilty of small-minded bigotry."

LaPolice can be seen briefly around the :25 mark of this trailer for the film:

Tony Perkins Worries Obama Will Seize Control of Government, Cancel 2016 Election

On his “Washington Watch” radio program yesterday, Family Research Council President Tony Perkins read a letter from a listener, Todd, who warned that President Obama is attempting a “hostile government takeover” that would cancel the 2016 presidential election.

“Well, Todd, good point,” Perkins responded.

Oklahoma GOPer Defends Stoning Gay People To Death

A Republican candidate for Oklahoma’s state house of representatives advocated stoning gay people to death in a Facebook post last year, writing that such a plan is “totally just” because he has “some very huge moral misgivings about those kinds of sins.”

The candidate, Scott Esk, responded to a Facebook commenter who asked if “we should execute homosexuals (presumably by stoning)” by arguing that gay people are indeed “worthy of death.”

Another Republican candidate for State House, Gordon Klingenschmitt of Colorado, has also said that “homosexual acts are worthy of death.”

HT: Igor Volsky.

Anti-Defamation League Condemns Tony Perkins For 'Using Holocaust Imagery' To Attack Gay Rights

Abraham Foxman of the Anti-Defamation League released a statement yesterday condemning Family Research Council President Tony Perkins for warning that supporters of gay rights will soon “start rolling out the boxcars to start hauling off Christians” to camps, rebuking his remarks as “offensive and inappropriate.”

Tony Perkins’ invocation of the Holocaust in his statement referring to a judge’s finding that a baker unlawfully discriminated against gay customers is offensive and inappropriate.

There is no comparison between contemporary American political issues and the actions of Hitler’s regime during the Holocaust. Such inappropriate analogies only serve to trivialize the Holocaust and are deeply offensive to Jews and other survivors, as well as those Americans who fought valiantly against the Nazis in World War II.

We urge Perkins to apologize and to refrain from using Holocaust imagery to make his point.

Perkins, of course, is far from the first Religious Right activist to describe gay people, who were among the victims of the Holocaust, as modern-day Nazis.

You can listen to Perkins’ remarks, first reported by Right Wing Watch, here:

Kansas Moves Ahead With Two-Tiered Voting System, Some Voters Allowed To Cast Ballots Only In Federal Elections

We reported last year on Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s plan to create a two-tiered voting system in his state, in which voters who registered with a federal voter registration form but did not meet the state’s strict new citizenship documentation requirement would be allowed to cast ballots in federal elections but would be barred from participating state elections.

Kobach claimed at the time that the two-tiered system was “merely a contingency plan” in the event that he lost a lawsuit seeking to require the federal form used in Kansas to include the state’s proof-of-citizenship requirement. Kobach won that suit, but the decision has been stayed pending appeal, meaning that Kansas will go ahead with Kobach’s two-tiered system in this summer's primaries, reports the Associated Press. Arizona, which joined Kansas on the lawsuit, is implementing a similar system.

The good news is that, according to Kobach, fewer than 100 Kansans who registered with the federal form but didn’t provide the correct citizenship documentation will be the inaugural members of the new federal-elections-only voting tier. Those voters, according to the AP, "will be given full provisional ballots during the Aug. 5 primary elections — but only the votes they cast in federal races will actually be counted."

The bad news is that 18,000 Kansans who registered with the state form but couldn’t provide the correct documentation still can’t vote in either type of election.

Kobach, of course, continues to claim that “no one is disenfranchised” by his policies.

AP:

WICHITA — Kansas voters who registered using a national form without providing proof of U.S. citizenship will be given full provisional ballots during the Aug. 5 primary elections — but only the votes they cast in federal races will actually be counted, the state’s top election official said Tuesday.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach told The Associated Press that fewer than 100 Kansas voters who used the federal registration form without providing citizenship documents will be affected.

“No one is disenfranchised — any person can vote a full ballot by providing proof of citizenship,” Kobach said. “The notion a person is disenfranchised because they have to provide proof of citizenship is a silly one.”

As of Tuesday, more than 18,000 Kansans still had their voter registrations suspended pending documentation of citizenship. The vast majority used the state form to register, and they will still not be allowed to vote at all in the primary or general election unless they prove to state election officials that they are U.S. citizens.

The exception that allows the federal registrants to still vote in the August primaries for federal races comes because the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals stayed a judge’s ruling that had forced federal election officials to help Kansas and Arizona enforce their citizenship requirements.

Glenn Beck's Lawyers Argue That His Attacks On Boston Marathon Bombing Victim Were Protected By First Amendment

Earlier this year, Abdul Rahman Ali Alharbi sued Glenn Beck for defamation over the fact that Beck had dedicated several days of radio and television programming to alleging that Alharbi, who was injured in the Boston Marathon bombing, was actually an al Qaeda "control agent" and "money man" who had financed the bombing and recruited the Tsarnaev brothers to carry it out.

None of that was true and so Alharbi sued Beck, seeking "punitive damages for defamation with malice." Now, Beck's lawyers have responded to the suit by arguing that it should be dismissed on the grounds that Alharbi was a "public figure" and that Beck's attacks on him were protected by the First Amendment:

Radio host Glenn Beck says in a recent legal filing that his on-air remarks inaccurately linking a Saudi Arabian student to the Boston Marathon bombings were protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution and that a federal judge should dismiss a libel case the student brought against Beck and his employers.

...

Beck's lawyers, in their recent filing in U.S. District Court for Boston, don't question Alharbi's innocence. But they argue that courts have set a high standard for libel in similar cases and that Alharbi's grievances fall short of that standard.

The talk show host's lawyers argue that to prevail in court against their client, Alharbi would have to prove "actual malice," including that Beck deliberately made false accusations against Alharbi.

Beck's lawyers also argue that the radio host's remarks were Constitutionally-protected criticism of the government's handling of national security. And they argue that Alharbi became a public figure in the days after the bombings, a designation that raises the bar for a libel claim.

Eric Cantor Pushes GOP To The Edge Of A Cliff, Falls Off

The headline of a New York Times article responding to Eric Cantor’s startling primary defeat last night read, “Cantor’s Loss a Bad Omen for Moderates.” That would be true if there were still moderates in the House Republican Conference to speak of.

But there aren’t, and you can thank Eric Cantor for that.

House Republicans are now heavily skewed to the right, including a large wing that refuses to ever collaborate with President Obama or congressional Democrats on anything. Cantor, of course, was one of the chief architects of the GOP’s hardline politicking and far-right shift.

Cantor helped sink bipartisan debt deals, including the 2011 budget “grand bargain,” and engineered the Republican strategy of manufacturing fiscal crisis after crisis by putting a ransom on must-pass fiscal bills.

As Bill Burton told the New Yorker in 2011, “Cantor has had an outsized influence on how poisonously partisan Washington has been these last couple years.”

Cantor also was behind the Republican Party’s decision following the 2012 election disaster to resist any calls to moderate or begin working, even slightly, with Obama. Instead, the GOP moved to rebrand itself by attempting to change its image, beating back on the (accurate) perception that it had become an extremist, uncompromisingly ideological entity.

Vanity Fair just this month ran a piece on Cantor’s attempt to seem more moderate, respectable and bipartisan — even while sticking to his old extreme policies. “[I]f people see you for what you really are, that’s a failure on your part,” Michael Kinsley wrote of Cantor’s rebranding attempt. “Success is when people see you as what you wish you were.”

In March, the New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza noted that Cantor, “the creator of a strategy to oppose and obstruct the Obama agenda” who has a “reputation as a Tea Party leader,” only sought to make “short-term adjustments in public relations” rather than to temper his increasingly unpopular, and unhinged, fanaticism:

Since the 2012 elections, the Republicans have been divided between those who believe their policies are the problem and those who believe they just need better marketing—between those who believe they need to make better pizza and those who think they just need a more attractive box. Cantor, who is known among his colleagues as someone with strategic intelligence and a knack for political positioning, argues that it’s the box.

By refusing to temper — and even encouraging — the party’s sharp far-right swing, Cantor helped to fashion a party that views even the perception of bipartisanship as blasphemy.

Take immigration, for example: While Cantor was actually blocking the House from voting on immigration reform legislation, he still tried to make it seem that the party was open to some reforms, knowing that a majority of Americans and the quickly growing Latino community strongly favored reform legislation. Cantor tried to make the GOP’s strict stance against any immigration reform palatable to the public, which eventually allowed his primary challenger to campaign against his supposed support for “amnesty.”

After encouraging hard opposition to any fiscal deals with Obama unless the president caved to their every demand, Cantor paved the way for a GOP where simply voting to lift the debt limit in order to avoid economic disaster or supporting relief for hurricane victims gives you the much-dishonored title of RINO, “Republican In Name Only.”

Cantor pushed the party so far to the right that even political posturing that had little to no effect on actual policy was too much for GOP primary voters, and now the politician often seen as the more conservative alternative to Speaker Boehner has become a target of the militant wing he helped create.

'We Are All Faceless': Glenn Beck Explains The Slender Man Phenomenon

Earlier this month, two young girls allegedly stabbed their friend nineteen times in an effort to please an internet urban legend known as Slender Man. Predictably, Glenn Beck was very alarmed by this since everything that ever happens always bears some deep social significance and must be taken as a sign that our culture is deeply sick and on the verge of collapse. As such, Beck and his staff have becomes obsessed with the story and are on the lookout for other possible Slender Man related crimes, such as an alleged attack carried out by another young girl on her mother earlier this week.

Beck and his staff discussed the Slender Man phenomenon during yesterday's morning meeting where Beck diagnosed the problem as being rooted in the fact that people are just desperately trying to fill the holes in their empty souls with things like this.

"We're starving to death," Beck lectured his staff in a very world-weary manner. "Slender Man is filling a hole in people's lives and what's going to happen is people are going to start talking more and more about Slender Man and more and more people will go in and try to fill that hole with Slender Man because it's new and it's exciting and it's different and it's kind of on the edge."

"We are all faceless," Beck said. "We're all worried that we're being sucked into these woods, that we have no idea what's in there":

Share this page: Facebook Twitter Digg SU Digg Delicious