After Week Of Sexist Meltdowns, Anti-Choice Activists Stick With Candidate Who Once 'Disgusted' Them

In late January, just days before Iowa caucus-goers cast the first votes of the presidential nominating contests, a coalition of leading women in the anti-abortion movement issued a scathing open letter urging Republican voters "to support anyone but Donald Trump." They cited what they saw as Trump's lack of commitment on their key issue, including their doubts about whether he would nominate justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade, help them to defund Planned Parenthood, or pick a vice president friendly to the anti-abortion cause.

But the letter ended with something more personal: an indictment of Trump's appalling treatment of women.

Moreover, as women, we are disgusted by Mr. Trump’s treatment of individuals, women, in particular. He has impugned the dignity of women, most notably Megyn Kelly, he mocked and bullied Carly Fiorina, and has through the years made disparaging public comments to and about many women. Further, Mr. Trump has profited from the exploitation of women in his Atlantic City casino hotel which boasted of the first strip club casino in the country.

America will only be a great nation when we have leaders of strong character who will defend both unborn children and the dignity of women. We cannot trust Donald Trump to do either. Therefore we urge our fellow citizens to support an alternative candidate.

Signing the letter were Susan B. Anthony List president Marjorie Dannenfelser and her SBA colleagues Jill Stanek and Marilyn Musgrave, former National Organization for Marriage leader Maggie Gallagher, activist Star Parker, Concerned Women for America founder Beverly LaHaye and CWA president Penny Nance.

Many of these activists have tried to paint the anti-abortion movement as a feminist, woman-centered endeavor and portray Planned Parenthood and Democrats as the true enemies of women.

Eight months later, several of the women who signed the letter are supporting Trump’s candidacy and a few are even “pro-life” advisers to his campaign.

What changed?

Certainly not Trump. Yesterday the Associated Press published a story detailing Trump’s history of demeaning treatment of women on the set of his reality show “The Apprentice”:

During one season, Trump called for female contestants to wear shorter dresses that also showed more cleavage, according to contestant Gene Folkes. Several cast members said Trump had one female contestant twirl before him so he could ogle her figure.

Randal Pinkett, who won the program in December 2005 and who has recently criticized Trump during his run for president, said he remembered the real estate mogul talking about which female contestants he wanted to sleep with, even though Trump had married former model Melania Knauss earlier that year: "He was like 'Isn't she hot, check her out,' kind of gawking, something to the effect of 'I'd like to hit that.' "

Former producer Katherine Walker said Trump frequently talked about women's bodies during the five seasons she worked with him and said he speculated about which female contestant would be "a tiger in bed."

A former crew member who signed a non-disclosure agreement and asked not to be identified, recalled that Trump asked male contestants whether they would sleep with a particular female contestant, then expressed his own interest.

"We were in the boardroom one time figuring out who to blame for the task, and he just stopped in the middle and pointed to someone and said, 'You'd f... her, wouldn't you? I'd f... her. C'mon, wouldn't you?'"

The person continued: "Everyone is trying to make him stop talking, and the woman is shrinking in her seat."

This story came just days after Trump, in the first presidential debate against Hillary Clinton, defended his history of comments demeaning women by saying that one object of those comments, Rosie O’Donnell, “deserves it and nobody feels sorry for her.” At the same debate, Clinton got under Trump’s skin by bringing up his treatment of Alicia Machado, the Miss Universe winner whom he reportedly called “Miss Piggy” and “Miss Housekeeping.” Trump responded the next day by explaining that Machado had “gained a massive amount of weight.” Then, a few days later, Trump took to Twitter in the middle of the night to call Machado “disgusting” and urge Americans to “check out” her nonexistent “sex tape,” only for it to be revealed that Trump himself was featured in a 2000 pornographic film by Playboy.

It was between the debate and the “sex tape” tweet that Trump’s campaign announced the formation of a “pro-life advisory council” that would work to help solidify social conservative support for the GOP nominee. The council, as had previously been announced, would be led by Dannenfelser. Its members would include Nance and Stanek, both of whom signed the anti-Trump letter with Dannenfelser back in January.

Some of the signers of that January letter have held firm, notably Gallagher, who wrote in The National Review in May that it would be “just too degrading” to support Trump. “If you join Team Trump,” she wrote, “you have to swallow not just what Trump has done and said but the next thing he will say or do. Truthfully, I think he lost me in March, when all it took was just a little prodding from little Marco to get the man to discuss his genitals on national TV. I don’t know what insulting, immoral, gross thing he will say next.”

Gallagher’s observation has held true, as Trump’s supporters have, again and again, had to put up with “the next thing he will say or do.”

But for the core of Trump’s new anti-choice team, his new promises to nominate justices who would overturn Roe and to sign a bill defunding Planned Parenthood and his pick of anti-choice hero Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate seem to have erased any concerns about his “disgusting” treatment of women—even as he continues what they once called his “disparaging public comments.”

The anti-choice movement is increasingly attempting to portray itself as “pro-women” rather than just anti-abortion. The support of activists like Dannenfelser for Trump, even after he gets caught in sexist meltdown after sexist meltdown, shows that for much of the movement this “pro-women” rhetoric is just window dressing.

Rick Joyner: 'We Haven't Had Any' Big Hurricanes Since Katrina

Last week, televangelist Rick Joyner took to “The Jim Bakker Show” to attack climate change as a hoax created by the Communist Party, reviving the myth that fears of “global cooling” once dominated the scientific community.

Joyner, who once claimed that Hurricane Katrina was “judgment from God” for homosexuality, mocked those who linked Katrina to global warming, claiming that “we went 11 years without another hurricane.”

“You lied to us,” he said, “you said there were going to be more and bigger—we haven’t had any.”

Of course, several hurricanes made landfall in the U.S. in the years following Katrina, including Hurricanes Ike, Irene and Sandy. And just this week Hurricane Matthew is moving through the Caribbean and towards the Atlantic Coast.

Trump Helped Finance Religious Right Groups Before Presidential Bid

Donald Trump’s efforts to cozy up to the Religious Right started well before he announced his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.

According to a report today from Real Clear Politics, Trump used his personal foundation, which he has not donated to since 2008 and is “funded by outside donors,” to make donations to prominent conservative groups, including Religious Right organizations, as far back as 2011.

Trump’s foundation contributed to social conservative groups in key GOP primary states such as South Carolina’s Palmetto Family Council and Iowa’s The Family Leader. Other beneficiaries included the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, led by Franklin Graham; the Citizens United Foundation, run by future Trump campaign official David Bossie; and the American Conservative Union Foundation, which hosts the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC).

“Such contributions, if they were made solely for Trump’s benefit, could violate federal self-dealing laws for private foundations,” RCP’s Rebecca Berg notes.

From 2011 through 2014, Trump harnessed his eponymous foundation to send at least $286,000 to influential conservative or policy groups, a RealClearPolitics review of the foundation’s tax filings found. In many cases, this flow of money corresponded to prime speaking slots or endorsements that aided Trump as he sought to recast himself as a plausible Republican candidate for president.

Although sources familiar with the thinking behind the donations cautioned that Trump did not explicitly ask for favors in return for the money, they said the contributions were part of a deliberate effort by Trump to ingratiate himself with influential conservatives and brighten his political prospects.



If the Trump foundation sent its money to The Family Leader and not its affiliated nonprofit, it did not properly note it in the filing and might have failed to earmark the money for charitable purposes, a violation of IRS rules. If the money was sent to the Family Leader Foundation, it was not recorded as such.



“If what he talked about was promoting his candidacy or fundraising for his campaign, it is not only self-dealing but potentially involves the foundation in making a grant to support political activity,” said [Rosemary] Fei. “That’s prohibited.”

Newt Gingrich Says Pastors Have A Duty To Run For Office And Fight 'Totalitarian Secularism'

The American Renewal Project, an effort organized by Christian nationalist and Religious Right political operative David Lane to encourage pastors to run for office and to mobilize their congregations to get involved in politics, posted a video yesterday featuring Newt Gingrich telling pastors that they have a duty to fight back against "those who would impose a totalitarian secularism on us."

"You're at a moment in history that is as defining as anything in the Old Testament," Gingrich said. "You're at a point where some people have to have the courage to witness for Christ, some people have to have the courage to tell the truth to their flock, some people have to have the courage to get into the public arena themselves."

Gingrich is proud to be a part of Lane's efforts to "encourage ministers to run for office" because ministers played a key role in the founding of this nation, he said, and today "we desperately need your help."

"We have not seen the Judeo-Christian historic traditions threatened the way they are today ever in American history," Gingrich said. "I think you have a duty ... to have the courage to stand up and tell the truth; tell the truth about those who would impose a totalitarian secularism on us, force us to bow to the power of the government in order to do things that our religious forbids, you have a duty to tell the truth about those who would kill us in the name of Islamic supremacy. And if you do your duty, you will be part of launching a Great Awakening that could once again help America."

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/3/16

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 10/3/16

  • Bradlee Dean says that Hillary Clinton is committing treason by "selling uranium ore to the Russians from underneath the ranchers in Oregon."
  • James Dobson urges his audience to "VOTE! VOTE! VOTE!": "Not only must we help select the next president. We also have the responsibility as Christian citizens to vote for godly and competent congressional representatives, senators, governors, mayors, local candidates, judges, and school board members. Finally, we must also help decide the great moral issues of our time, including the protection of human life, religious liberty and traditional marriage. Now is the time to take a stand for righteousness and to challenge those whom you know to make their votes count. America’s future depends on what happens on November 8, 2016. Don’t even think about staying at home."
  • Extremist anti-LGBT group MassResistance has now established a chapter in Nigeria.
  • Stefano Gennarini, director of legal studies at the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-Fam), declares that "we must fight the global war against marriage."
  • A warning from Bill Muehlenberg: "The activists have warned us in no uncertain terms what their diabolical plans are as they seek to completely obliterate marriage and family, and remake society into their own sordid image. And we see examples of this every day. It is time to wake up to reality: we are under assault, and this is an all-or-nothing war. We either stand and resist, or we will lose it all."
  • Finally, Gary Cass offers up "Reason #3 Why Hillary Clinton is Not a Christian."

Robert Maginnis: Obama Has A 'More Islamic' Worldview

While chatting last week with televangelist Jim Bakker, Family Research Council senior fellow Robert Maginnis suggested that President Obama is biased against Christianity because of his “Islamic” worldview.

“The man had a Muslim father, he grew up part of his life in Indonesia,” Maginnis said. “When he is amongst a Muslim population, he is incredibly sympathetic, and apologetic for our Christian nation.”

“His worldview is that of being more Islamic than he is being Christian,” he continued, “so that explains to me why he would favor giving them a pass and coming down hard on a Christian, western civilization.”

Jim Bakker: The Devil Wants To Kill Donald Trump

Televangelist Jim Bakker warned last week that the devil is out to “kill” Donald Trump because of his opposition to abortion rights.

Bakker boasted about a 1979 interview he conducted with Ronald Reagan, in which the future president reportedly said that “America will become Sodom and Gomorrah” if the country doesn’t change its ways.

“They were saying the same things about him that they are saying about Trump today,” Bakker said. “The reason I mention Trump is because he is pro-life. He believes in protecting our borders.”

Trump, he said, now faces satanic attacks as a result of his opposition to abortion rights and desire to overturn Roe v. Wade: “They will kill for that. They will kill him for that. The devil, the demons of hell, will come out to protect the killing of babies. The devil loves to kill—tried to kill Jesus, tried to kill Moses at birth.”

Larry Pratt: Founders Would Want Everyone To Carry An M-16 'At A Minimum'

Larry Pratt, the executive director emeritus of Gun Owners of America, insisted over the weekend that the founding fathers would have wanted every military-age man in the U.S. to carry an M-16 rifle “at a minimum.”

Pratt invited Don Brockett, the author of a book called “The Tyrannical Rule of the U.S. Supreme Court,” to his “Gun Owners News Hour” program on Saturday. Brocket argued that the Second Amendment exists to allow states to defend themselves against invasion, which he said could mean that people should be allowed to have “equal weaponry” to an “invading army,” such as rocket-propelled grenades.

“In Article 1, Section 10, where the state can’t engage in war unless it’s invaded, well how can it defend itself if it’s being invaded if the people don’t have any Second Amendment right to arms?” Brockett asked. “And I maintain in the book, even though some may think this is going too far, that you’re entitled to the same measure of weapons as the weapons that might be used against you. So does that mean everybody can have an RPG in their home? I don’t know. I think we need to discuss it, because how could you stop the invading army unless you have the equal weaponry? Or if you want to provide it by your national guard, which can be distributed to individual citizens when that need comes about.”

Pratt responded that the Militia Acts of 1792 “seemed to provide for making sure all militia-age men had to have military firearms. Now, I suppose in today’s context, at a minimum that would be the machine gun battle rifle, the M-16, or whatever its modern, even more modern equivalent is, that every American soldier would be carrying. That would seem to me, if those were laws consistent with the Second Amendment, then that would be kind of what the founders and their successors had in mind.”

Brockett then brought up the possibility of a state needing to be prepared to repel “an invading army,” including perhaps “the federal government invading the state.”

RNC Attacks Tim Kaine For Being A Lawyer In 'Willie Horton' Style Ad

One day before the vice presidential debate, the Republican National Committee released an ad attacking Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine for his time as a criminal defense attorney.

Today, the RNC tweeted a Roll Call story that compares the ad to the Willie Horton ad, which was widely viewed as an example of racist dog whistle politics when it aired in the 1988 presidential campaign. The RNC later deleted its tweet.

RNC Communications Director Sean Spicer also tweeted the article but later deleted it.

“Long before Tim Kaine was in office, he consistently protected the worst kinds of people,” the narrator intones ominously before describing several cases that Kaine worked on when he was a pro bono attorney for defendants in death penalty cases. “Tim Kaine—he has a passion for defending the wrong people,” the narrator says.

When Kaine ran for governor of Virginia in 2005, he faced similar attacks, and Hillary Clinton has also endured criticism for representing a man accused of rape when she worked as a defense attorney in Arkansas.

The fact that the RNC would tout its ad’s similarities with the racist Willie Horton ad is bad enough, but the attack also strikes at the heart of the Sixth Amendment guarantee that in “all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial” and “have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.”

It seems the RNC believes that people accused of crimes, or at least vicious ones, simply shouldn’t have legal representation and/or that defense attorneys should not zealously represent their clients.

The RNC probably would have put together a great ad attacking John Adams, the lawyer who represented the British soldiers implicated in the Boston Massacre.

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