Jerry Falwell Had A Dream

Last night, Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. addressed the Republican National Convention, where he showered praise on Donald Trump while warning that Hillary Clinton’s appointments to the Supreme Court would represent a “fatal blow to our republic.”

He also repeated a joke from his father, televangelist Jerry Falwell: "Chelsea Clinton had interviewed him about the three greatest threats facing this nation. He replied, ‘Those three greatest threats are Osama, Obama and yo’ mama.’

“Osama is now gone, Obama has six months left in his term and the only way to make America great— and one — again is to tell Chelsea’s mama, ‘You’re fired!’” he said.

Of course, Falwell, Jr. didn’t mention it was the Obama administration that made sure “Osama is now gone.”

Far-Right Pastor: Donald Trump Will Help Us 'Retake The Culture'

Carl Gallups, an End Times pastor and Donald Trump presidential campaign surrogate, told WorldNetDaily yesterday that electing Trump president would give conservative Christians an “opportunity” to “retake the culture.”

He said that we are witnessing “a great spiritual civil war in our nation, perhaps one like never before,” but a Trump presidency could undercut the forces “trying to persecute us.”

“If we back Trump, maybe, just maybe, with the grace and mercy of God’s answers to our prayers, we can get some breathing room,” Gallups said. “We can once again have the opportunity as Christians to retake the culture. We can once again live under a government that isn’t deliberately trying to persecute us and drive us out of the public square. And if we can get that, maybe we can even make America great and safe again.”

“You will never find a candidate with whom you have perfect agreement,” Gallups counseled. “I too have issues with some of Trump’s platform. But, here is the foundational truth of the matter – which candidate is saying, ‘Let’s Make America Great Again,’ and appears to sincerely mean that, and which candidate is promising more of Obama’s policies, ramped up on political steroids? That’s the bottom line real choice we have to make, regardless of specific differences we may have.”

Gallups said even when there are differences, conservatives have a chance to influence Donald Trump or even change his mind. He believes that is simply not an option when it comes to Hillary Clinton.

However, ultimately, Gallups argues Christians are facing a real time of danger. The real issue, the pastor said, goes beyond politics. It’s about the need for Christians to get some “breathing room” in a culture that is rapidly turning against them.

“In my opinion, this particular election is right up there with the presidential elections before and during the Civil War,” said Gallups. “We are in a kind of societal civil war right now! And we are certainly in a great spiritual civil war in our nation, perhaps one like never before.

“It’s no great act of morality or conscience to opt out of this. If we back Trump, maybe, just maybe, with the grace and mercy of God’s answers to our prayers, we can get some breathing room. We can once again have the opportunity as Christians to retake the culture. We can once again live under a government that isn’t deliberately trying to persecute us and drive us out of the public square. And if we can get that, maybe we can even make America great and safe again.”

5 Conservatives Who've Admitted Trump Won't Actually Build A Border Wall

Donald Trump's acceptance speech last night at the Republican National Convention was high on fear-mongering and low on policy specifics. Not surprisingly, one specific policy he did bring up was his promise to "build a great border wall to stop illegal immigration, to stop the gangs and the violence, and to stop the drugs from pouring into our communities." (Although, as the Washington Post pointed out, he left out his promise to make Mexico pay for it.)

Trump's promise to build a wall along the entire border with Mexico has been a cornerstone of a campaign that has cast Mexicans and Mexican Americans as frightening outsiders and criminals. It's not a serious policy proposal. Instead, it's rhetorical prop for a campaign that relies on stirring up fear of outsider.

As the Anti-Defamation League has explained, building a wall along the entire border would be "impractical and very likely ineffective":

A wall or a fence along the entire border with Mexico would be impractical and very likely ineffective. The border between the U.S. and Mexico is almost 2,000 miles long. It spans difficult terrain, including deserts and mountains. Rivers flow along two thirds of the border. Much of the area is private property, which the government would have to buy from the owners to build a fence or wall, and many do not want to sell the land. The logistics alone make building a wall very difficult, if not impossible.

A handful of conservatives, recognizing this reality, have recently attempted to give Trump an out by acknowledging that he won't actually build a wall but is instead talking about a "virtual" or metaphorical wall.

Rep. Blake Farenthold of Texas, an enthusiastic supporter of Trump, said earlier this month that "it's going to end up having to be a virtual wall," saying that aerial surveillance and "strategically placed walls" in urban areas are a more effective border control strategy than a literal wall along 2,000 miles of border. "You can buy a predator drone for what two miles of wall costs," he said.

Another Republican congressman who's supporting Trump, Rep. Chris Collins of New York, has also claimed that Trump's wall will be "virtual," telling a newspaper, “Maybe we will be building a wall over some aspects of it; I don’t know.”

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has also endorsed Trump, has also claimed that Trump is speaking only metaphorically about a wall, saying, "It’s a wall, but it’s a technological wall, it’s a digital wall … There are some that hear this is going to be 1,200 miles from Brownsville to El Paso, 30-foot high, and listen, I know you can’t do that. ”

Even Dan Stein, the head of the anti-immigrant Federation for American Immigration Reform, has acknowledged that Trump's wall isn't a real thing.

“The wall is a surrogate for getting the border under control,” Stein said last month. “There have been physical structures in place down there since the 1980s. You need physical structures at certain high entry points to channel traffic. Ranchers who are out there in the middle of nowhere, they don’t see why you would need a border wall.”

“The wall is a surrogate for border control operations,” Stein added. “What [Trump’s] saying is he’s gonna get the job done. People who believe he’s actually gonna put a brick on every centimeter of 2,000 miles are in a sense mistaking his intention. The language he’s using is what you use in a political campaign, and if you take Hillary Clinton at her word, then she wants to embrace a limitless immigration platform.”

None other than manic Trump supporter Alex Jones has also admitted that Trump's wall promise is baloney, telling The New Republic, "The border wall is just a metaphor. It’s ridiculous."

These aren't people who object to Trump's fiercely anti-immigrant agenda. But they do acknowledge that his wall proposal would be an ineffective way to achieve even his draconian anti-immigrant goals.

Trump is conning his supporters with tales of his building prowess and vows to build a "big, fat, beautiful wall."

He isn't proposing a border wall as a serious solution to a serious problem. Instead, it's a rhetorical prop in his campaign of demonizing and scapegoating immigrants, and even some of his allies are admitting it.

Donald Trump And The Appeal To White Voters

The 2016 Republican convention began with Iowa Rep. Steve King making an explicit case for white supremacy and ended with Donald Trump making not-so-subtle appeals to the racial resentments of white voters.

Trump began his speech pledging to “be a country of law and order.” The GOP nominee exclaimed, “The crime and violence that today afflicts our nation will soon, and I mean very soon, will come to an end. Beginning on January 20, 2017, safety will be restored.”

Thus Trump capped off the one cogent message of the 2016 Republican convention: Be afraid, be very afraid. Be afraid of terrorism, be afraid of crime, but most of all be afraid of people who look or sound different from you, or come from other countries. This was taken to the extreme by former Navy Seal Marcus Luttrell who told the convention Monday, “The world outside of our borders is a dark place — a scary place.”

Trump’s appeal to these basest of instincts was also based on a lie. There is no rising crime wave plaguing America. As Politifact said in rating Trump’s claim “Pants on Fire,” “If you look at overall violent and property crimes — the only categories that would seem inclusive enough to qualify as "crime," as Trump put it — he is flat wrong. In fact, crime rates have been falling almost without fail for roughly a quarter-century.”

More abhorrent, this “law and order” message is an implicit appeal to our basest and most divisive instincts. It is an appeal begging white voters  to show up at the polls in great enough numbers to overwhelm a voting population that is growing more diverse by the year. It is evidence of the narrow path Republicans believe they must take to win the White House in 2016. Yet it further condemns the party to failure in national elections.

Twenty-eight years ago, on August 1, 1988, the Rush Limbaugh show went national. Republicans had won at least a plurality of the vote in four of the six preceding presidential elections. Democrats have won a plurality of the vote in five of the six presidential elections that have taken place since. Yet Republicans still are trying to win based on the votes of Limbaugh listeners.  

As The Atlantic noted shortly after the last presidential election, “In 1988, Michael Dukakis lost the white vote by 19 points and won 111 electoral votes. In 2012, Barack Obama lost the white vote by a worse margin — 20 points — and tripled Dukakis with 332 electoral votes.”

Prior to the convention, Republican strategist Rick Wilson pointed out on MSNBC that "racism is baked in the cake" of the Trump campaign. Republicans in Cleveland could have moved away from subtle and not-so-subtle appeals based on race. But clearly they took a different course. From the convention committee promoting white supremacist tweets, to attacks on Black Lives Matter, their "baked-in" racism was on display again and again.

Trump’s speech was a capstone on this week and a clear indication that his campaign believes that only white voters matter.

Right Wing Round-Up - 7/21/16

  • Simon Maloy @ Salon: Mike Pence’s Iraq lie: The VP candidate (wrongly) announced the discovery of WMDs.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/21/16

  • James Dobson has officially endorsed Donald Trump. 
  • Roger Ailes has resigned from Fox News. 

Anti-Immigrant Extremist Joe Arpaio To Address RNC

According to the Associated Press, Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio “has snagged a coveted speaking spot on the final night of the Republican National Convention.”

Arpaio, who has campaigned alongside Donald Trump, was recently found "in civil contempt of court for violating three of his orders stemming" from a "long-running racial-profiling case" where he is accused of targeting Hispanic residents.

Just yesterday, Arpaio was stripped of some of his oversight authority and has asked the federal judge presiding over the profiling case for leniency as he will "learn as soon as Friday whether he’ll be referred to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for criminal prosecution for contempt of court. "

Racial profiling is just one of a long list of abuses committed by Arpaio and his office.

Arpaio brags about running a "concentration camp" for his detainees and has a record of withholding basic medical care from prisoners and flouting sanitary standards. His office has reportedly ignored over 400 sex-crime cases, targeted Latino residents and neighborhoods, stalked Latina women and retaliated against those who criticized Arpaio.

In one case, members of Arpaio’s department staged a hoax assassination attempt against the sheriff to enhance his popularity, framing an innocent man in the process. Arpaio hired people with records of domestic violence and child sex crimes to work in his armed "posse" guarding schools in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre.

The sheriff also tapped birther conspiracy theorists to form a "cold case posse" to investigate the truth behind President Obama's birth certificate, and unsurprisingly concluded that it was a fake.

It is no wonder, then, why Arpaio has become a Republican icon

Tom DeLay: Obama Has 'Blood On His Hands'

While reacting to the recent shooting of police officers in Baton Rouge, former House GOP Leader Tom DeLay said that “the president has blood on his hands” because he hasn’t denounced the Black Lives Matter movement.

DeLay told Newsmax host Steve Malzberg earlier this week that “these cops’ blood are on his hands” because President Obama supports a movement “that calls for the death of cops.” Of course, Black Lives Matter has never called for the murder of police officers.

“There is no statistic anywhere that shows as a trend or as a worldview that cops in this country are biased or racist or go after blacks just because they’re blacks,” DeLay said. “There is nothing that shows that that is the case, and for the president of the United States to support what Black Lives Matter is doing is going to cause more deaths amongst our cops in this country.”

Is Eric Trump Gaslighting Us?

For months, Donald Trump has faced questions about his philanthropic giving, or lack thereof, as more and more evidence shows that the business mogul gives very, very, very little money to charity even though he often brags about making huge donations.

But according to his son, Eric Trump, charitable giving is “the barometer by which we will be measured for our time here on earth,” as he told members of the Republican National Convention last night:

…I often think about the legacy I wish to leave my children, and to me, there are few things that I hold closer to my heart than charity. For me, it's the essence of who we are as human beings. It's the barometer by which we will be measured for our time here on earth. As Martin Luther King, Jr., once said, 'Life's most persistent and urgent question is what are you doing for others?' When at 22 years old I founded the Eric Trump Foundation, to benefit St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, an incredible, incredible organization. I run my foundation based on the principles my father taught me: honesty, integrity, and values. I expect other charities to be run by the same moral code, not serve as conduit for personal enrichment, not become a beacon of corruption and scandal.

As David Fahrenthold of the Washington Post reported, when asked this week, Eric couldn’t remember a single instance in which his father personally donated to his charity, despite having previously said that the elder Trump had contributed generously:

Last week, Eric Trump said that his own charitable foundation had received "hundreds of thousands of dollars" in personal donations from his father.

But on Monday, Eric Trump said he could not name a single instance when Donald Trump had given such a gift.

"I’m sure there have been but without going back through 10 years, I wouldn’t remember check for check off the top of my head," Eric Trump wrote in an email message to The Washington Post.



Why had he asserted that his father had given his charity hundreds of thousands of dollars, if now he didn't remember it ever happening?

"Just to be clear, I never said no," Eric Trump wrote in a late-evening email on Monday, meaning he hadn't said that Donald Trump had not given the Eric Trump Foundation a personal gift.

But Eric Trump said he was too busy to look for evidence that would back up his earlier statements: "I have a lot going on — I just don't have the time. Good luck with the story," he wrote.

Alex Jones Diagnoses Hillary Clinton With Psychopathy

It is sad to see Dinesh D’Souza, once considered by many to be a “conservative intellectual,” continue to drift to the far-right fringe. In yet the latest example of this, D'Souza appeared yesterday on Alex Jones’ bizarre conspiracy theory program to discuss his new film on Hillary Clinton.

D’Souza, who claims that Clinton is trying to “steal America,” apparently forgot about the American principle of the right to be represented by an attorney, as he criticized Clinton for representing an alleged rapist in a 1975 trial while she was working as a lawyer in Arkansas.

Referring to an audio recording of Clinton discussing the trial, D’Souza misrepresented Clinton’s remarks and even said he heard “the voice of evil" in the tape.

“And for me, it’s knowing about how psychopaths and sociopaths are,” Jones added. “They have this real self, but everything else is like fake to manipulate. When she goes to California and speaks to Latino groups, she puts on this fake Latino voice. When she goes to Kentucky, she goes, ‘How you doin’ there, boy,’ like she’s, you know, Grandma Clampett getting some possum grits. I mean, it’s like I wouldn’t hang around with anybody that when they got around different groups, talked a different way. I mean, it is bizarre to show that that’s what psychopaths do – and I think she’s a psychopath, I think she’s a full-blown psychopath – is that they do feel this need to just put on these fake acts. It’s very creepy.”

“I think so,” D’Souza added. “And I think she might even have gotten some of this from Bill, because Bill is the master of it.”

D’Souza continued, “People have heard, ‘I did not have sex with that woman,’ but what they actually haven’t heard is you go back and play the old tapes where Bill and Hillary were both confronted with all this stuff and the kind of silky nonsense they put out there, at one point, I think it was Steve Kroft says to the Clintons, ‘Well, you know, I think Americans can kind of accept that you guys, whatever your problems, you’ve worked it out, you’ve made some kind of arrangement, and then Bill jumps in. He goes, ‘Arrangement? We don’t have an arrangement, we love each other. We have a marriage. It’s totally different.’”

Jones interjected: “Yeah, she’s not banging three chicks a day like me too.”

Later, Jones defended Roger Ailes against reports that Megyn Kelly said he had sexually harassed her, claiming that Kelly has “Jezebelian energy” and is secretly “an agent for the Clintons.”

“Well, that’s why Megyn Kelly – I don’t want to get off on a jag – I’ve watched her, I see her on that sinister power trip, it’s that Jezebelian energy, and, you know, Roger Ailes made her who she is,” Jones said. “To see her say, ‘He hugged me once too hard and I want him taken out,’ and I know, because I have the inside baseball, it is from the Clintons, there are talking points, people are being threatened, I’ve talked to the host. And it’s like wow, she really is an agent of the Clintons and all that stuff with Trump and it’s like seeing her join with evil, now, this is a thousand times worse with Hillary, obviously, but it’s just, it’s the creepiness. It’s the dishonor of it. It’s the sliminess that really tells you what we’re dealing with is a bunch of evil people.”

Although Jones said he lacks the energy to control other people, “these evil people” like the Clintons “enjoy… running other people’s lives, knowing what you’re doing, controlling you, ruining you, just because they’re quite frankly jealous of you, and they’re jealous of America, they’re jealous of free market, they’re jealous of open, free societies, compared to everything else, not saying we’re perfect. It’s like what you said in your first film, they want mount our head on the wall.”

 

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