Beck: Election Shows that Half of Americans are 'Utterly and Completely Lost in Darkness'

After having had a day to digest the election results, Glenn Beck is no longer mystified by results and the unrecognizable America that surrounds him but now knows exactly what the problem is: half of Americans are "utterly and completely lost in darkness": 

Ralph Reed: It's Not My Fault

Election Day was a lousy day for the Religious Right. But movement leaders have been quick to assert that they are not to blame, pointing fingers variously at Hurricane Sandy, Mitt Romney, the unknown waiter who recorded Romney’s dismissive “47 percent” remarks, and the strong turnout of young voters and people of color.

Religious Right leaders had spent four years attacking Obama an enemy of faith, freedom, God, and America, only to see him re-elected in an Electoral College landslide. They had warned that defeating him might be a last chance to forestall God’s judgment on America. They fasted and prayed and believed that they would be delivered on Election Day. But that’s not what happened. 
 
Not only did Obama win big, but voters in Maine and Maryland embraced marriage equality, and Washington seems likely to join them.  Minnesota voters rejected a Religious Right-backed attempt to put anti-gay discrimination into the state’s constitution.  Tammy Baldwin was elected to the Senate, where she will be the first openly gay member.
 
Well before all those results were in, it was clear that the night was not going according to what Religious Right leaders had thought was God’s plan.  At 10 pm, Tony Perkins and Jim Garlow held a phone call briefing for pastors. It was a very subdued affair, with representatives of the state marriage campaigns trying to sound hopeful about the then-uncalled outcomes in their states.  Perkins and Garlow also held a Wednesday webcast on the "aftermath and aftershocks" as the scope of their Election Day drubbing sank in (see video highlights).  “The problem in America is sin,” said Garlow. But, he said, “we have no problem that the next Great Awakening cannot solve.”
 
The tendency after an election defeat to avoid blame by casting it elsewhere was in full flower the day after the election.  Rep. Jim Jordan, a Religious Right favorite, described Mitt Romney as “the most liberal Republican nominee in history” who had “waffled” on abortion, had passed a health care bill as governor, and had a hard time convincing conservatives on his commitments on taxing and spending.  Perkins criticized Romney for not campaigning on issues of life, marriage, and religious liberty, even though Obama used them to appeal to his base. Republican pollster Kellyanne Conway agreed, saying Republicans had not done enough to draw the contrast on social and “moral” issues. Regarding the marriage wins, Perkins blamed Obama in part, saying the president’s policies have had “a shaping influence on the culture.” He and others also blamed marriage equality proponents’ financial advantage.
 
In a Wednesday morning press conference at the National Press Club, Ralph Reed’s message was clear: don’t look at me. Reed had made sweeping promises that the Faith and Freedom  Coalition, his conservative voter ID and turnout operation, would stun pollsters and lead to a big conservative victory.  “We did our job,” he insisted, recounting the tens of millions of phone calls, mailings, and other voter contacts his group made.  He said his group had run the most efficient, most technologically superior voter contact and GOVT operation the faith community has ever seen.  He claimed credit for increasing both white evangelicals’ share of the electorate and the share of the vote they gave to the Republican nominee.  But it wasn’t enough.
 
“We can’t do the Republican Party’s job for them.  We can’t do the candidates’ job for them.” In part, Reed blamed “candidate performance issues,” his euphemism for the Akin-Mourdoch rape comments that led to their undoing.
 
Reed said his successful efforts were not in the end sufficient because people of color and young voters turned out in numbers that he had not anticipated -- and voted overwhelmingly to re-elect the president.  The fact that young voters, African Americans, and Latinos turned out so strongly seems to have stunned conservative figures across the board. And it confirmed for many of them the need for the Republican Party and the conservative movement to stop alienating Latinos and figure out how to attract younger voters.  “We need to do a better job of not looking like your daddy’s Religious Right,” said Reed.
 
Some Religious Right leaders sought solace in faith that God is ultimately in control.  “America as we know it may have signed its death warrant tonight,” said Garlow during the pastors' briefing.  But not to worry, he said, nations come and go, but God’s kingdom is forever. Perkins said FRC and its allies would continue to stand strong in the face of “an increasingly hostile culture.”
 
Others looked forward to the next political fight.  Pollster Conway predicted that 2014 would bring, like 2010’s Tea Party wave, a conservative resurgence and called for candidate recruitment to begin now.  Perkins agreed that conservatives have never had a stronger “farm team” and touted potential conservative candidates for 2016, including Marco Rubio, Bobby Jindal, Rand Paul, and Mike Pence.

Right Wing Round-Up - 11/7/12

  • PFAW: Marriage Equality Victories a Watershed Moment for LGBT Americans.
  • John Stanton @ BuzzFeed: University Of Mississippi Students Riot Over Obama Victory.
  • Alex Seitz-Wald @ Salon: GOP civil war: Herman Cain calls for 3rd party.
  • Tommy Christopher @ Mediaite: The Loser One! Donald Trump Calls For ‘Revolution’ And ‘March On Washington’ Over ‘Phoney’ Obama Victory.
  • Towleroad: Despite Fierce Campaign by Anti-Gay Activists, Iowans Retain Pro-Equality Justice David Wiggins.
  • Tara Culp-Ressler @ Think Progress: Rape Comments Cost Anti-Choice Candidates Their Seats.
  • Jeremy Hooper: Election 2012: I couldn't have scripted a clearer repudiation of the NOM agenda.

Right Wing Leftovers - 11/7/12

  • Joseph Farah says President Obama's re-election is "God’s judgment on a people who have turned away from Him and His ways and from everything for which our founders sacrificed their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor."
  • Mike Huckabee says that the election results "only remind me that our country has slipped into a deeper state of dependence on government than I wanted to believe."
  • And Gary Bauer declares that "hope and change gave way to fear and smear."
  • Nobody is actually blaming Bill Keller for Romney's loss because he is a nobody who wields no influence.
  • Allen West is demanding a recount in the election that appears to have cost him his seat in Congress.
  • Roy Moore, the "Ten Commandments Judge," was re-elected to a seat on the Alabama Supreme Court after having been removed from that very position in 2003.
  • It is amazing to see Newt Gingrich returning to his "reasonable and rational"  commentator persona now that the election is over.
  • Finally, Bryan Fischer knows how to get the GOP back on track: Rick Perry 2016.

Owens: If Marriage Equality Passes the 'Whole Gamut of the Family is Going to be Destroyed'

William Owens of the virulently anti-gay Coalition of African-American Pastors and the National Organization for Marriage talked to Sandy Rios and Tim Wildmon of the American Family Association for their organization’s election night special about the “unbelievable” impact if Maryland voters approve their state’s marriage equality law, which did indeed pass. He said if we “change God’s law” by legalizing same-sex marriage and adoption then “the whole gamut of the family is going to be destroyed and all areas of the social life will be destroyed from what has been for thousands of years.”

Listen:

Pat Robertson on Obama's Victory: 'What is Going On with the American People?'

The Christian Broadcasting Network put on an election night special and host Pat Robertson appeared to be dumbfounded that President Obama won re-election. Robertson’s guests included Fred Barnes of The Weekly Standard, John Fund of the Wall Street Journal, Regent University vice president Paul Bonicelli and Romney adviser Jay Sekulow of the American Center for Law and Justice, the legal group Robertson founded. Barnes reassured Robertson that even if Obama wins, the President “hardly has a mandate for anything” because “this was a status quo election,” as apparently Barnes thinks any incumbent who gets re-elected doesn’t have a mandate. But Sekulow said that Obama will likely appoint two or three justices to the Supreme Court and will use the power of the executive branch to push new “encroachments on liberty and freedom.”

Robertson, who throughout the program held out hope that Karl Rove’s prediction that Romney could win Ohio would materialize, was stunned that Obama was the winner: “What have they got? He doesn’t seem to have any program and yet he’s been able to win a re-election, what is going on with the American people?” Bonicelli said that Americans will spend their next four years “regretting this decision” and Robertson warned that the U.S. is looking more like Western Europe and even Zaire.

Watch highlights here:

Of course, Robertson should not have been surprised since earlier this year God told him who would win the election.

Beck's Post-Election Recommendations: Buy Farmland and Guns!

Today, Glenn Beck sought to make sense of the results of last night's election, beginning with a lengthy, tear-filled monologue about George Washington before getting down a business by rolling out hints about his plans to create an entire Blaze "ecosystem" that will be able to operate independently of the government and existing media structure because everything is about to go downhill ... so people need to start buying up farmland, pull their kids out of the public schools, and loading up on guns:

Family Research Council Licks its Wounds after Election Pummeling

A despondent Tony Perkins hosted the Family Research Council’s post-election special “Election 2012: Aftermath & Aftershocks,” which featured Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) and Rep-elect. Mark Meadows (R-NC), Derek McCoy of the Maryland Marriage Alliance, Jim Garlow and FRC Vice President Tom McClusky. The group suffered a huge blow as marriage equality won victories in four states and their effort to oust a pro-equality Iowa justice failed, in addition, FRC’s Faith Family and Freedom Fund invested hundreds of thousands of dollars to aid Todd Akin, who lost in a landslide.

After speaking to McCoy, Perkins claimed that same-sex marriage will never be morally acceptable or within the bounds of natural law whatever the voters in Maryland and elsewhere say, while McClusky said that “civil disobedience” will now be necessary thanks to marriage equality’s increasing victories.

Garlow, who prior to the election warned that an Obama second term will make America “unrecognizable” and “forever gone,” said that Christians should now expect immense persecution from the government, and Meadows called for Christians to emulate Gideon’s army and remember that “our God will not be mocked.”

Watch highlights here:

Obama Reelection a Mandate for Strong, Fair Supreme Court Picks

With the right wing maintaining a narrow majority on the Court, a Romney victory could have meant an entrenched bias on the Court for decades to come.

Election Night With the AFA: Obama Won Because he Harnessed People's Capacity for Envy, Hate, & Greed

Like Glenn Beck, the American Family Association also hosted a live election night broadcast which took on a somber and sour mood once it became clear that the conservative agenda was going down in defeat all across the board, prompting Sandy Rios to say that Elizabeth Warren was elected to the Senate because Massachusetts had been inundated by gays who destroyed the educational system as she watched in horror the breaking news that Todd Akin was being "blown out" in his bid for the Senate.

Morton Blackwell was then brought in to explain that President Obama was going to win re-election because he "did not underestimate the capacity of people to harbor envy and hate and greed for something for nothing," while Bryan Fischer suggested that perhaps we ought to just split the country in half and let conservatives run their half and liberals run the other ... with a massive wall in between, of course, to keep out all the liberals who would try to sneak in.  

For Tim Wildmon, Obama's re-election could best be explained by the fact that he was re-elected by the states where people don't go to church before finally simply declaring that "it's a tragic night":

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